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By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1998
A U.S. Army Corps of Engineers effort to dispose of silt dredged from Chesapeake Bay shipping channels has resulted in a mile-long "whoops."Silt taken from an approach channel to the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal has ended up in the wrong place -- not in the underwater canyon selected to receive it, but to the south of that, beyond an underwater barricade meant to keep it away from some favorite fishing spots off Pooles Island.The 367,000 cubic yards of dredging debris -- enough to fill Oriole Park at Camden Yards almost to the top of the right field wall -- now coats a one-mile-long, quarter-mile-wide stretch of bay bottom with a layer of silt about 9 to 15 inches thick, said spokesman Rich Chlan of the corps' Philadelphia district.
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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2011
From his blue clapboard and brick home overlooking Herring Bay in the southern Anne Arundel County community of Rose Haven, Mark Curl has views of some of Maryland's iconic sites: the Bloody Point Lighthouse and the Bay Bridge. But a small patch of land much closer to his home — a private beach that is part of the popular Herrington Harbour Marina South, surrounded by 1,000 banana palm trees in the summer — has gotten most of his attention lately. Curl, who has lived at his home for about 30 years, says a beach-replenishment project this spring resulted in the deposit of large amounts of fine silt in Herring Bay, making for a muck-filled mess in the shared waterway.
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NEWS
By Victor Paul Alvarez and Victor Paul Alvarez,Contributing Writer | May 23, 1993
Jackie Carrera was standing in nearly two feet of mud.Trudging all day, she and about 130 other volunteer surveyors fanned out along 50 miles of the Winters Run stream yesterday. The survey was organized by Maryland Save Our Streams, Baltimore Gas and Electric and Harford County to identify potential water quality problems like the one pulling Jackie Carrera into the hazy muck.She was standing in a deposit of silt, sediment and mud from area construction sites that end up in the stream.Silt is among the main pollution problems facing the 17,000 miles of streams in Maryland, 95 percent of which feed into the Chesapeake Bay."
EXPLORE
June 28, 2011
Last week when Herbert Sachs, Maryland's representative on the Susquehanna River Basin Commission, said the problem of silt build-up behind Conowingo Dam had been discussed for years, but nothing had been done about it, he was spot on. The inaction over well in excess of a decade means the reality of a substantial ecological disaster is looming large. The kind of disaster risked by leaving the mess of sediment behind Conowingo Dam isn't the sort of thing that would cost human lives, but it is the kind of thing that is bound to change life along the Chesapeake Bay. It's also the kind of disaster we've experienced before.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2003
Whenever it rains, which is often these days, the headwaters of Middle River transform into a screaming bright red-orange glow. Nature at work? Yes, but some Baltimore County residents point to WaterView, the $40 million housing development sprouting next to the river, one of the Chesapeake Bay's primary tributaries. County officials, the residents say, haven't done enough to prevent red clay sediment from running off the WaterView property into the river. Nor, they say, has the developer of WaterView, Larry Rosenberg.
NEWS
By Louis Sahagun and Louis Sahagun,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 4, 2003
SALTON SEA, Calif. - Scientists have uncovered a distressing secret about the lakebed of the Salton Sea: Portions of it are covered with a 50-foot-thick layer of silt the consistency of peanut butter. That revelation is particularly troubling for California's largest lake, a place of promise and despair that has endured three decades of scientific study and political haggling. The latest findings place in jeopardy a proposal by state and federal agencies to build an 8 1/2 -mile dike across the desolate and smelly lake to stave off ecological disaster.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2011
From his blue clapboard and brick home overlooking Herring Bay in the southern Anne Arundel County community of Rose Haven, Mark Curl has views of some of Maryland's iconic sites: the Bloody Point Lighthouse and the Bay Bridge. But a small patch of land much closer to his home — a private beach that is part of the popular Herrington Harbour Marina South, surrounded by 1,000 banana palm trees in the summer — has gotten most of his attention lately. Curl, who has lived at his home for about 30 years, says a beach-replenishment project this spring resulted in the deposit of large amounts of fine silt in Herring Bay, making for a muck-filled mess in the shared waterway.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1998
STEVENSVILLE -- The Maryland Port Administration plans to begin digging 18 million cubic yards of silt and mud from the state's shipping channels next year, depositing the muck over a 4-mile stretch of open water near the Bay Bridge, about a mile off the northern tip of Kent Island.While state officials await completion of an Army Corps of Engineers environmental study, the project, part of a 20-year overall plan, has drawn furious opposition from the bayside community this summer.Residents, environmentalists and political candidates have been taking aim at the proposal, which port officials say is a vital part of a long-term plan to keep the port of Baltimore competitive.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2004
FORGET THAT waterfront with million-dollar views. It's for pikers. Let's talk about the bay's new third-of-a-billion-dollar view. It's from Poplar Island, rebuilt over the past few years at a cost of about $327,000 per acre. The good news is that we taxpayers already own it, and tours are available to groups of eight or more (see below for details). I recently made the one-hour paddle in my kayak from the Talbot County mainland to check on the resurrection of Poplar Island, where the needs of commerce and wildlife are happily intersecting as they seldom do. A huge federal-state project to rebuild the eroded island with silt dredged from Baltimore's ship channels has created the only place in Maryland's mid-Chesapeake where one can enjoy 20 feet of elevation.
NEWS
November 27, 2005
CA should leave parkland open In the minutes of the Columbia Town Center Community Association Board's Oct. 26 meeting, it is stated that "CA is looking at alternative ways to deal with the dredging of the Lake, since it now appears it will cost $5 million to dredge Lake Kittamaqundi and $3 million to complete the work at Lake Elkhorn due primarily to the difficulty in removing the silt. One idea, not yet studied, is to fill in the north end of the Lake (Kittamaqundi) with the silt, but this is just one idea among many to be analyzed."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | March 23, 2010
Efforts to shore up the base of the cliffs on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay could trigger problems for the area's freshest fossil beds - and turn the bay floor into a silty "desert," an expert on the region's geology says. Lauck Ward, a geologist at the Virginia Museum of Natural History who has studied the Maryland and Virginia cliffs for more than 30 years, says the best fossils, laid down as much as 18 million years ago, would be buried by riprap and slumping sand. "Scientifically it would be a wipeout," he said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | January 17, 2010
After more than two months of preparations to dredge Columbia's Lake Elkhorn, the project was shut down for the winter before any sediment was drawn from the lake. According to a Columbia Association announcement, the freezing temperatures made it impossible to use equipment designed to extract the water from the silt. Work stopped just before Christmas and is expected to resume around mid-March. Currently, the lake is frozen over. The Columbia Association is also awaiting a waiver approval from the Maryland Department of the Environment that is required before dredging can begin, a spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By David Berry | November 4, 2009
The Susquehanna is arguably the most important river in the Chesapeake Bay's watershed. Its two branches drain 27,500 square miles of the bay's 64,000-square-mile watershed. By the time the river reaches the bay at Havre de Grace, it has traveled 448 miles, and it will deliver 25 billion gallons of water to the bay on an average day. But there are no average days. Water flow ranges from a record 650 billion gallons in a single day to less than 2 billion during a drought. Over the course of a year, half of the fresh water that's so vital to an estuary such as the Chesapeake comes down the Susquehanna.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun Reporter | June 24, 2007
To those who love it, little New Germany Lake is the perfect place to teach the next generation how to dog-paddle. Tucked in among spruce and hemlock, complete with diving ducks and loons, the 13 acres of open water seem like an expanse of untouched nature, and an opportunity for old-fashioned fun. Care for a dip of Hershey's ice cream at the snack stand? Fishing rodeo, anyone? But lately residents of Garrett County, in Western Maryland, and even some vacationers have noticed unsettling changes in their beloved lake.
NEWS
November 27, 2005
CA should leave parkland open In the minutes of the Columbia Town Center Community Association Board's Oct. 26 meeting, it is stated that "CA is looking at alternative ways to deal with the dredging of the Lake, since it now appears it will cost $5 million to dredge Lake Kittamaqundi and $3 million to complete the work at Lake Elkhorn due primarily to the difficulty in removing the silt. One idea, not yet studied, is to fill in the north end of the Lake (Kittamaqundi) with the silt, but this is just one idea among many to be analyzed."
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | September 28, 2005
Annapolis plans to dredge parts of Spa Creek in November to make room for the Volvo Ocean Race boats that will stop over in the city next spring. Under the plan, the city will spend about $600,000 to even out a 50-foot-wide swath of seafloor from Prince George Street to the mouth of the Severn River. "We're really only taking a few bumps out of the channel," said City Administrator Bob Agee. Most of that channel is 17 feet deep at a mean low tide, but there are mounds of silt that decrease the depth to 13 feet at places, Agee said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | January 17, 2010
After more than two months of preparations to dredge Columbia's Lake Elkhorn, the project was shut down for the winter before any sediment was drawn from the lake. According to a Columbia Association announcement, the freezing temperatures made it impossible to use equipment designed to extract the water from the silt. Work stopped just before Christmas and is expected to resume around mid-March. Currently, the lake is frozen over. The Columbia Association is also awaiting a waiver approval from the Maryland Department of the Environment that is required before dredging can begin, a spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2005
Evan Belaga keeps a watchful eye on Weems Creek from his living room window. Last week, he said, he observed "a huge plume of silt and sediment" in plain view of his and other homes built on the banks of the creek. He worries that several ongoing construction projects in Annapolis, coupled with recent heavy rains, are hurting the creeks that empty into the Chesapeake Bay. "These little streams can't carry all this storm water," said Belaga, president of the Weems Creek Conservancy, a group concerned about the waterway's health.
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