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By John Lacy and John Lacy,Hartford Courant | August 4, 1995
In a world where sleek, speeding Rollerblades and high-tech video games compete for kids' attention, it may be a little surprising that a glob of goo known as Silly Putty keeps bouncing along 45 years after it arrived on the scene.This pliable little plaything became a craze in the 1950s. Children would not sit still until they got their hands on Silly Putty. Then they sat only long enough to press it against their favorite comics and peel away the impressions.As soon as a kid learned how high Silly Putty bounced, these pinkish, nut-sized balls were ricocheting all around their homes.
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NEWS
December 25, 2008
Gift-giving that bears fruit Christmas is truly a child's holiday. It is a day filled with wonder and joy, of love and reunion. Why should citrus play any role at all? At least that's a question that occurred to me most every Dec. 25 through the 1960s as I slid down the stairs (yes, slid on the back of my footed pajamas as it was less likely to wake sleeping parents in the pre-dawn hours) to discover that Santa had slipped tangerines and oranges into my stocking - again. What's the deal with all the fruit, fat man?
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NEWS
August 7, 1995
FROM The Hartford Courant:In a world where sleek, speeding Rollerblades and high-tech video games compete for kids' attention, it may be a little surprising that a glob of goo known as Silly Putty keeps bouncing along 45 years after it arrived on the scene.This pliable little plaything became a craze in the 1950s. . . .It's still in play in the '90s.Belinda Lux, a physical therapist . . . says Silly Putty is a good material for hand-squeezing exercises because it has the same consistency as products promoted specifically for that purpose.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | October 20, 2008
Crayon marks are welcome on paper, but as parents know, they often end up on painted walls, wood floors and other places where they don't belong. A friend asked the best way to get them out, which I thought was a good question for the Monday Consult. It turns out that Crayola.com has a helpful series of stain-removal guides for its products. Here's some of the advice you can find there for regular crayons: * For brick, carpet, plastic and a number of other surfaces, WD-40 is the magic bullet.
NEWS
May 11, 1992
THIS NEWSPAPER'S new ombudsman occasionally gets calls from people displeased that the paper dirties their hands. The Baltimore Sun and other papers are adopting increasingly "low-rub" inks to counter that problem. The advances in printing technology, however, come with a cost:Silly Putty doesn't pick up the Sunday comics anymore.We came upon this revelation while trying to help a child discover the joys that the whimsical putty held for the pre-Nintendo generation. Was there any greater entertainment than flattening the putty on Dick Tracy's face, lifting the image and stretching Tracy 'til he looked like, well, Flattop?
NEWS
May 3, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org/ detectives. * What are the three basic rock types? * Who developed the world's first electric battery? * What year did Silly Putty first advertise on television? ROCKHOUNDS From diamonds to gold, a wealth of incredible jewels exists just below the earth's surface. Now you can get the lowdown at Junior Rockhound Magazine. Dig in at www.canadianrockhound.com/junior.html. You'll learn how to tell the minerals from the rocks, and how to tell the difference between the three basic rock types.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 23, 1994
Two one-act plays about diseases are the Vagabond Players' entry in this year's Baltimore Playwrights Festival. And, thanks to the playwrights' use of non-naturalistic devices, both "Silly Putty Man" and "Now Gotta Be Now" are more theatrical than the usual docu-drama-style handling of the subject.The title of Greg Jenkins' "Silly Putty Man" comes from the main character's description of his physical condition due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. Ed South explains to the audience that his mind is intact but his muscles are turning into silly putty.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | October 20, 2008
Crayon marks are welcome on paper, but as parents know, they often end up on painted walls, wood floors and other places where they don't belong. A friend asked the best way to get them out, which I thought was a good question for the Monday Consult. It turns out that Crayola.com has a helpful series of stain-removal guides for its products. Here's some of the advice you can find there for regular crayons: * For brick, carpet, plastic and a number of other surfaces, WD-40 is the magic bullet.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | November 20, 1992
HBO lost its Joseph Stalin halfway between the script and the screen.The ambitious, meticulously photographed film has its moments, but in the end, it drowns in a mass of rubber-face, glue and cosmetics.This big-name, skillion-dollar production, lavishly photographed on location in some of the very places Stalin lived and ruled from 1924 to 1953, gets lost in pounds of Silly Putty applied too heavily to actor Robert Duvall's face.There are other problems with HBO's "Stalin," which premieres tomorrow night.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1994
Here is the schedule for the rest of the 1994 Baltimore Playwrights Festival:* "Silly Putty Man," by Greg Jenkins, and "Now Gotta Be Now," by Mark Watson. June 16-26. 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays; 7 p.m. Sundays. Vagabond Players at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St. (410) 563-9135. $9.* "From Vision to Inheritance," by Brian Klaas. July 7-24. 8 p.m. July 7, Fridays and Saturdays; 7 p.m. Sundays. AXIS Theatre, 3600 Clipper Mill Road. (410) 243-5237. $10.* "Listen for the Miracle," by Mary Cinnamon.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2005
What do Viagra and Silly Putty have in common? Both started out as something else. In 1944, Silly Putty was a failed attempt to make a synthetic rubber for soldiers' boots and airplane tires, but it found fame and fortune after someone thought to package it in plastic eggs and sell it as a toy in 1949. Viagra, also known as the "little blue pill," was developed in the early 1980s as a chest pain treatment, but it found its niche elsewhere in the 1990s. "It didn't turn out to be as effective for its original purposes as it needed to be," said Kate Robins, a spokeswoman for Viagra's creator, Pfizer Inc. "But it demonstrated potential for male erectile dysfunction, and that use for that compound is pretty well known."
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - The right leg-kick is slow and high, the knee bent to the level of his chin. His slender upper body rotates left and rear. At the apex of his motion, he harbors his power - a kind found less in muscle-bound strength than in movement reverently mastered. Natural as a waterfall, the leg descends, the torso follows, the front foot anchors in the earth. A ball erupts from his left hand, sizzling. How hard it travels, nobody knows: No radar gun can track it. This Philly ballyard is thick and green, lush with summer on a steamy late Sunday afternoon.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 10, 2001
This is how Truffaldino, the title character in "A Servant to Two Masters," attempts to create a bit of makeshift glue to re-seal a letter in the Young Vic/Royal Shakespeare Company's production: First actor Jason Watkins takes a bite out of the small piece of bread he has been hoarding as "emergency rations." But chewing it into a sticky paste gets the gluttonous servant's taste buds going. He raises one foot in glee. A look of sheer ecstasy crosses his face. Before he realizes what he's done, he has swallowed the morsel.
NEWS
May 3, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to www.4Kids.org/ detectives. * What are the three basic rock types? * Who developed the world's first electric battery? * What year did Silly Putty first advertise on television? ROCKHOUNDS From diamonds to gold, a wealth of incredible jewels exists just below the earth's surface. Now you can get the lowdown at Junior Rockhound Magazine. Dig in at www.canadianrockhound.com/junior.html. You'll learn how to tell the minerals from the rocks, and how to tell the difference between the three basic rock types.
NEWS
August 7, 1995
FROM The Hartford Courant:In a world where sleek, speeding Rollerblades and high-tech video games compete for kids' attention, it may be a little surprising that a glob of goo known as Silly Putty keeps bouncing along 45 years after it arrived on the scene.This pliable little plaything became a craze in the 1950s. . . .It's still in play in the '90s.Belinda Lux, a physical therapist . . . says Silly Putty is a good material for hand-squeezing exercises because it has the same consistency as products promoted specifically for that purpose.
FEATURES
By John Lacy and John Lacy,Hartford Courant | August 4, 1995
In a world where sleek, speeding Rollerblades and high-tech video games compete for kids' attention, it may be a little surprising that a glob of goo known as Silly Putty keeps bouncing along 45 years after it arrived on the scene.This pliable little plaything became a craze in the 1950s. Children would not sit still until they got their hands on Silly Putty. Then they sat only long enough to press it against their favorite comics and peel away the impressions.As soon as a kid learned how high Silly Putty bounced, these pinkish, nut-sized balls were ricocheting all around their homes.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- About all that has been clarified by Ross Perot's gathering of the state leaders of his "United We Stand America" organization in Dallas is that he continues to hold a firm grip on it behind his customary veil of secrecy.Not only were reporters kept out of almost all the business sessions, but by a vote of 42-8 the leaders followed Perot's preference of not releasing any numbers on the organization's membership. At a press conference, he again dismissed questions about the size of the membership as "Silly Putty."
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | October 23, 1992
WASHINGTON - Even if he finishes a distant third, packs up his pie charts and retreats to the comfort of his billions, independent presidential candidate Ross Perot will have made a vital contribution to the world of politics.Great one-liners.In this year of RoboCandidates and vice presidential attack dogs, Americans owe the tart-tongued Texan a debt of gratitude for enlivening the political discourse.Often, campaigns have been built around a single catch-phrase: Walter Mondale tossed around "Where's the beef?"
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | June 23, 1994
Two one-act plays about diseases are the Vagabond Players' entry in this year's Baltimore Playwrights Festival. And, thanks to the playwrights' use of non-naturalistic devices, both "Silly Putty Man" and "Now Gotta Be Now" are more theatrical than the usual docu-drama-style handling of the subject.The title of Greg Jenkins' "Silly Putty Man" comes from the main character's description of his physical condition due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease. Ed South explains to the audience that his mind is intact but his muscles are turning into silly putty.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1994
Here is the schedule for the rest of the 1994 Baltimore Playwrights Festival:* "Silly Putty Man," by Greg Jenkins, and "Now Gotta Be Now," by Mark Watson. June 16-26. 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays; 7 p.m. Sundays. Vagabond Players at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St. (410) 563-9135. $9.* "From Vision to Inheritance," by Brian Klaas. July 7-24. 8 p.m. July 7, Fridays and Saturdays; 7 p.m. Sundays. AXIS Theatre, 3600 Clipper Mill Road. (410) 243-5237. $10.* "Listen for the Miracle," by Mary Cinnamon.
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