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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  SILLY You think you know an old familiar friend, and then you discover that there is a history of which you were unaware. You may think that you know words, too, and expect them to have clear identities. But words, like people, can have complicated pasts, altering their identities over time in what is called semantic drift.  You think that silly  means "foolish" or "unserious," as indeed it does.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  SILLY You think you know an old familiar friend, and then you discover that there is a history of which you were unaware. You may think that you know words, too, and expect them to have clear identities. But words, like people, can have complicated pasts, altering their identities over time in what is called semantic drift.  You think that silly  means "foolish" or "unserious," as indeed it does.
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NEWS
October 31, 1999
Get as silly as you like with these simple-to-make books.What you need* child's favorite storybook* variety of magazines with lots of photographs* 8 1/2 -by-11-inch sheets of construction paper* child scissors* nontoxic white glue* 6 large interlocking metal rings* black washable marker* hole puncherWhat to do together1. Read your child's storybook together. Then, in preparation for making the flip books, discuss the book in terms of who (people or animal characters), what (activities or events)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
I only have 2 million other better things to write about. But after 24 hours of waiting for someone else to unload on Sean Hannity, the Fox News host who defines political stooge, I have to say something. I held off when this GOP tool ran around on the Texas border in sunglasses and a baseball hat on backwards with Gov. Rick Perry. I even ignored the picture Hannity tweeted of him with his arm over a machine gun as he posed in a boat on the Rio Grande alongside Perry -- who we now know is really an intellectual giant because he has glasses with thick rims.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 8, 1991
Not many playwrights devote five plays to the same character, but that's how many comedies John Patrick has penned about eccentric junk collector Opal Kronkie -- so far. Seven more and he'll have enough to launch a television sitcom.That would be appropriate, judging from "Opal is a Diamond," the current example at Arena Players. As directed by Ben Prestbury and starring Arena veteran Verna Day, "Opal is a Diamond" is as entertainingly silly as the silliest sitcom.Opal's junk-collecting is reminiscent of "Sanford and Son;" her good-hearted bumbling brings to mind Carol Burnett, and, in the wackier moments, her hijinks suggest "I Love Lucy."
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Gady Epstein and Sarah Koenig and Gady Epstein,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2001
Calling the city state's attorney's attack on him "silly" and her understanding of her own budget "incomplete," Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday that he would rather Patricia C. Jessamy concentrate on fighting crime. O'Malley was responding to reporters' questions about a recent "community newsletter" Jessamy's office produced that included a long, critical commentary of the mayor signed by her. About 28,000 copies of the newsletter were distributed as an insert in the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper, and mailed to groups, churches, hospitals and elsewhere.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | June 7, 1994
Susan Flori Amerikaner is doing lunch her way. Munching a bagel in her sister Ilene's Owings Mills home and chatting about her evolution from Montgomery County elementary school teacher to award-winning children's television writer."
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | May 1, 1991
THREE POLITICIANS once came up behind me as I quietly sat at a bar and began bellowing that they were going to knock my block off and stomp me flatter than a pancake. They called me all sorts of colorful names that impugned my ancestry, questioned my sexual habits and suggested that I was lower than a spittoon. They were upset about something I had written.Fortunately, I was having a drink at the moment with Johnny Kerr, the former basketball player who now broadcasts the Chicago Bulls game.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | August 5, 2008
Seldom does a Seattle series go by that I don't get several e-mails or personal entreaties to interview reliever J.J. Putz. And, of course, this is understandable because of the similar ridiculousness of our respective surnames. Some of you probably remember that I did just that a couple of years ago for a column in The Sun. I approached J.J. in the Mariners clubhouse and introduced myself and expected some kind of reaction when he heard my last name, but he just stared at me as if I had just surfed back from Gilligan's Island.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2003
"I'd look pretty silly right now on the plains of Spain with a serape on." -- Clint Eastwood, Mystic River director, on the evolution of his career
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 24, 2014
"Discrimination," he said, "is horrible. It's hurtful. It has no place in civilized society... " You would think that statement, delivered recently in the Kansas legislature, a noble sentiment no right-thinking person could argue with. But we are gathered here today to argue with it. Because it turns out that when Republican legislator Charles Macheers said "discrimination," he didn't mean, well ... discrimination. Mr. Macheers sponsored a bill -- passed overwhelmingly by the Kansas House, but killed last week by the Senate in an attack of common sense -- that sought to exempt any business or government employee from providing "any services, accommodations, advantages, facilities, goods or privileges" related to any "marriage, domestic partnership, civil union or similar arrangement" if doing so would conflict with the employee's" sincerely held religious beliefs.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
Peter Morici may be an effective "pitch man" for office equipment company Kyocera in their TV commercials, but as a world-respected economist? Not so much. Mr. Morici is the type of economist who has accurately predicted nine of the last two recessions. As to his recent commentary ("Another economic crisis brewing," Nov. 18), his loose language and use of facts as evidence to bolster his calamitous prediction are disingenuous at best. Here are some examples: First, he states that "middle class consumers are fleeing to dollar stores (from Walmart)
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2013
In an election where every vote mattered , 36 voters made a choice for Annapolis mayor other than incumbent Democrat Josh Cohen or Republican Mike Pantelides, who was victorious by a mere 59 votes. Three dozen people wrote in all manner of other choices for mayor, ranging from serious to silly. A dozen people wrote in votes for Bevin Buchheister, who ran against Cohen in the Democratic primary, though some had difficulty spelling her name correctly. There also was one vote for "BB," perhaps from someone who didn't even want to attempt spelling Buchheister's name.
NEWS
August 19, 2013
Between Egypt and disgraced politicians, August has proven itself a more robust month for news than usual this year, yet there's always room in the summer doldrums for the wacky and off-beat. And for generations, few individuals have proven themselves better suited to provide that brand of comic relief than the men who have served as Maryland's comptroller. Whether it was Louis L. Goldstein's tireless campaigning or his cheerful but grammatically-challenged signature send-off, "God bless y'all real good," or even William Donald Schaefer's diatribes against the world or generally bizarre behavior, Maryland comptrollers have a tradition of quirky entertainment.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | October 7, 2012
Not so long ago, many believed the advent of social media would contribute to more substantive discourse in modern campaigns. But no such luck in our hotly contested presidential race. Sideshows have ruled the day. From caged dogs on car roofs to birth certificates to out-of-context alleged gaffes, it's been "gotcha politics" played out in real time. If it seems the daily one-hit wonder stories enjoy a longer than normal shelf life, they do. Well-financed super PACs are at least partly to blame.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2011
Michael K. Williams, who played one of the greatest villains in TV history on HBO's "The Wire," is joining the cast of NBC's "Community" for three episodes, according to Dan Harmon, executive producer of the NBC sitcom. Williams, who played stick-up man Omar Little in the Baltimore-based drama, will be cast as a biology professor in "Community," Harmon said. The producer added that he would like to use Williams in more episodes, but the actor is under contract to HBO's "Boardwalk Empire.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | April 26, 2007
Customers can see One-Eyed Mike's in two very different ways. On one hand, it's a crowded little Fells Point bar and restaurant, complete with a silly ahoy-ye-mateys name, a tattooed and T-shirted wait staff and a recent kitchen mishap featuring a fire extinguisher that went off when dropped. Poor:]
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 18, 1994
The knee that Tonya winds up whacking is her own.Russia says, "You win, we join you." NATO answers, "No, we need a menace, and you are it."The folks who try to convince you that Aristide is the problem, are the problem.The graffiti artist who rewrites "Hon," on the "Welcome to Baltimore," sign is silly. The city, scrubbing it off, is stuffy. The state Senate, extorting the city to restore it, is stupid.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | July 21, 2011
Baltimore mayoral candidate Otis Rolley needed to get some attention and to boost his name recognition. That he has done, though most of the attention from his proposal to tax ammunition at a dollar a round in the city has been derisory. The Internet is abuzz with reaction to his suggested ammo tax, just one of 12 steps he promises to take as mayor to "make every neighborhood in Baltimore safer. " Calling himself "the man with a plan," the challenger to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's attempt to win a term on her own after succeeding the ousted Sheila Dixon says he's not at all disturbed by the scorn stirred up by his tax idea.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
I just finished reading your article about the current craze blazing through the younger set for "planking" ("Prone to planking on the Web" June 8). I was amused at the comments by the older set who are confused, concerned and just don't get it. As the 50-year-old father of two teenagers myself (and a self styled survivor of the '70s) allow me the opportunity to offer two words of consolation and (maybe) understanding to concerned parents: pet rocks. I promise not to mention that other craze of the 1970s: streaking.
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