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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
A Maryland man has been charged in U.S. District Court with selling drugs on the massive online black market Silk Road, which was shut down earlier this month by federal authorities.  Court documents filed on Monday charge Jacob Theodore George IV, 32, who allegedly used the name "digitalink", with selling heroin and methylone over the sites from November 2011 to January 2012 using its encrypted servers and digital currency.  The indictment...
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BUSINESS
Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
A federal judge imposed a six-year sentence Friday on Jacob Theodore George IV, who sold heroin on the online drug bazaar Silk Road. George, 33, an Edgewood man with a history of arrests, drug abuse and mental health problems, apologized to the judge. He said he cried as he confessed to the federal agents who caught him. "I made a bad decision helping with Silk Road," George said, reading from prepared notes. George, who was taken into custody in early 2012, was one of the first dealers on the site to be arrested.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2013
The end came quickly for Silk Road, when federal agents crept in to nab the alleged kingpin of the secret $1.2 billion online drug marketplace as he sat at his laptop in the sci-fi section of a San Francisco public library. Within hours, though, many vendors and customers who said they used the "Deep Web" bazaar were back in action - moving to similar websites like Sheep Marketplace, which advertises marijuana, LSD and a multitude of prescription pills for sale in largely untraceable transactions.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
Inside a drab computer lab at the Johns Hopkins University, a team of researchers is trying to build something that has never existed before: a digital currency that changes hands completely in secret. Its name is Zerocoin. The untraceable currency is designed to compete with other virtual moneys such as Bitcoin, which are drawing attention as alternatives for businesses and individuals — and drawing criticism from some who believe they enable money laundering and other criminal activity.
BUSINESS
Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
A federal judge imposed a six-year sentence Friday on Jacob Theodore George IV, who sold heroin on the online drug bazaar Silk Road. George, 33, an Edgewood man with a history of arrests, drug abuse and mental health problems, apologized to the judge. He said he cried as he confessed to the federal agents who caught him. "I made a bad decision helping with Silk Road," George said, reading from prepared notes. George, who was taken into custody in early 2012, was one of the first dealers on the site to be arrested.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
As they rushed toward a suburban Utah home with guns drawn, agents knew they were on to a significant figure in the Silk Road online drug bazaar - a major cocaine dealer, perhaps. Message boards on Silk Road - the world's most popular online drug market - had been buzzing about the sale that triggered this bust. Users of the encrypted website advertised drugs, forged documents and hacking tools for sale through seemingly anonymous transactions, but a kilo of pure Peruvian cocaine was something special.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
An undercover federal agent in Maryland played a key role in the shutdown Wednesday of what authorities describe as a massive online drug marketplace, owned by a 29-year-old engineer who authorities say schemed to kill perceived rivals. Authorities say Ross William Ulbricht built his Silk Road site into a Deep Web marketplace where buyers and sellers traded more than $1 billion in illegal narcotics using the virtual - and virtually untraceable - currency called Bitcoin. Ulbricht is accused of serving "several thousand drug dealers" since January 2011.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | October 3, 2013
The Silk Road case shined a light on the deep underbelly of the web -- exposing many casual Internet users to unfamiliar terms like Deep Web, Tor and Bitcoin. So we asked Johns Hopkins cryptography professor Matthew Green -- who recently was in the news himself for his writings on the NSA -- to help break down this shadowy virtual world for our readers. Q: What exactly is Deep Web? The Deep Web means two things. In some cases it's used to refer to the part of the web that isn't reached by search engines.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | July 4, 2002
It's a long and winding Silk Road, and you can explore its sinuous twists and turns through Sunday at the National Mall in Washington. The Silk Road is the name given to the historic trade route that connected the peoples and traditions of Asia with those of Europe, and it's being featured at the Smithsonian Institution's 36th Folklife Festival. Musicians, dancers and craftsmen from more than 20 nations are represented, including Turkey, Syria, Pakistan, Bangladesh, China, Mongolia and Japan.
NEWS
May 18, 1996
IMPERIAL RUSSIA and the Soviet Union failed to link their Central Asian conquests to warm water through subversion of Iran or Pakistan. Iran, however, has succeeding in linking those now-independent Islamic republics of Central Asia with its port of Bandar Abbas at the mouth of the Persian Gulf.The opening of 100 miles of railroad in Iran from Mashhad to the border town of Sarakhs, and another 80 miles from Sarakhs to Tejen in Turkmenistan, does what Stalin, Khrushchev and Brezhnev and Gorbachev could not accomplish.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
As details continue to emerge about the two year-investigation into Ross William Ulbricht, an unassuming 29-year-old and alleged founder of the massive online drug market Silk Road, one important piece of information remains cloaked in shadow: How did the FBI find the organization's servers? Court documents offer only the barest of details. "The FBI has located in a certain foreign country the server used to host Silk Road's website," an agent wrote in charging documents against Ulbricht, who was charged by a grand jury in Maryland with conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance and attempted witness murder, among other charges.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Ross Ulbricht commissioned no fewer than six murders for hire earlier this year to protect his position as the operator of the sprawling online drug market Silk Road, according to federal prosecutors. The new accusations come as the U.S. Attorney's Office in New York prepares to argue before a judge this morning that Ulbricht should be denied bail. Two murder for hire plots authorities say Ulbricht put into motion were detailed in the charges against him, and the four new attempts are described in a filing federal prosecutors provided to the Baltimore Sun. Ulbricht is accused of running Silk Road over the course of more than two years and building it into the most popular place to buy drugs online.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
A federal judge in Manhattan denied bail Thursday to Ross Ulbricht after federal prosecutors alleged that he plotted six killings earlier this year to protect his position as the operator of the sprawling online drug market Silk Road. Assistant U.S. Attorney Serrin Turner said it's not clear whether five of the intended victims actually exist. But Turner argued that Ulbricht could not be released without endangering the public or running the risk that he would flee. He said the 29-year-old had explored obtaining citizenship in another country and ordered fake identity documents.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun and By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
As they rushed toward a suburban Utah home with guns drawn, agents knew they were on to a significant figure in the  Silk   Road  online drug bazaar -- a major cocaine dealer, perhaps.  Message boards on  Silk   Road  -- the world's most popular online drug market -- had been buzzing about the sale that triggered this bust. Users of the encrypted website advertised drugs, forged documents and hacking tools for sale through seemingly anonymous transactions, but a kilo of pure Peruvian cocaine was something special.  Federal authorities in Baltimore had been working for a year to breach the inner circle of  Silk   Road's  kingpin, whom they knew only by the alias Dread Pirate Roberts.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
An administrator with wide-ranging access to the supposedly secret transactions on the Silk Road online market pleaded guilty to a drug charge Thursday in Baltimore after he was caught in a federal sting in January. Curtis Clark Green, 47, was unmasked as postal inspectors delivered a kilogram of cocaine to his Utah home. He had given his address to an undercover agent. Green's plea agreement reveals more details about how federal agents in Maryland closed in on the operators of the shadowy Internet site over the course of two years and built cases against its users and administrators.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
An Edgewood drug dealer pleaded guilty Tuesday in federal court to supplying customers around the world through the Silk Road online marketplace. Jacob Theodore George IV, 32, admitted to agents with the Department of Homeland Security in January 2012 that he sold heroin and methylone — a synthetic drug often marketed as "bath salts" — using the hidden site. Silk Road was taken down and its alleged founder arrested at a San Francisco library early last month. George's attorney said he had been in custody since last year, but the charges against him were not filed until after the bust.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | November 23, 1993
BEIJING -- Among the sand dunes and the ruins of once flourishing oases on China's legendary Silk Road, archaeologists have dug up an ancient city that may have been inhabited by dropouts from Alexander the Great's army.The rediscovery of the mysterious city of Niya came 90 years after British explorer Sir Aurel Stein was led by villagers to its remains in 1903 and, according to the official New China news agency, "pillaged Greek-style furniture and ancient documents written in the long-dead Kharoshthi language."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
A Maryland man has been charged in U.S. District Court with selling drugs on the massive online black market Silk Road, which was shut down earlier this month by federal authorities.  Court documents filed on Monday charge Jacob Theodore George IV, 32, who allegedly used the name "digitalink", with selling heroin and methylone over the sites from November 2011 to January 2012 using its encrypted servers and digital currency.  The indictment...
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