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By Catherine Cook | June 23, 1991
Soft and easily washed silks have become a staple in the weekend wardrobes of women, and now they're making their way into the closets of men. First came the shirts, then the blazers and now -- the new alternative to the blazer -- the revamped bomber jacket.
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Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
A federal judge imposed a six-year sentence Friday on Jacob Theodore George IV, who sold heroin on the online drug bazaar Silk Road. George, 33, an Edgewood man with a history of arrests, drug abuse and mental health problems, apologized to the judge. He said he cried as he confessed to the federal agents who caught him. "I made a bad decision helping with Silk Road," George said, reading from prepared notes. George, who was taken into custody in early 2012, was one of the first dealers on the site to be arrested.
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FEATURES
By Maude McDaniel and Maude McDaniel,Special to The Sun | August 2, 1994
Growing up is hard to do, and since the culture has grown down so obligingly to meet them, young people seem to do less and less of it -- or even want to. So it's refreshing to read a novel that actually dares to move beyond the adolescent discovery of sex and death to explore the true nature of the growing-up process.Near Silk Hope, N.C. (where the silk industry never got off the ground because of spectacularly bad planning), "smart talking, wisecracking, free-spirit" Frannie lives with her sister, Natalie, in the big old farmhouse that has been left to the women of their family by their great-grandmother.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2014
For years, Silks, the bar at the corner of Hudson Street and South Lakewood Avenue in Canton, was mostly overlooked. It was just another corner bar you'd walk past on the way to someplace else. But now, after a two-and-a-half-year renovation, Silks has reinvented itself as a welcoming neighborhood spot. With a good, revolving beer selection, an appealing menu that focuses on pub-friendly food and smiling faces behind the bar, it's giving local residents a reason to do more than walk on by. Scene & Decor Aesthetically, Silks has cleaned up its act, transforming its run-down space into something fresh and attractive.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 2003
Harper's Choice resident Naomi Nelson is a crafty lady whose trademark product is a handmade stuffed apple made of silk and lace. She is one of the many artisans who will be exhibiting their wares Oct. 17 at the new Street Fair at Howard County's fifth 50+ Expo, the popular health fair for seniors. "I love to make things," said Nelson, who is retired from a government job at Fort Meade. "I make everything. I make stuffed teddy bears with matching photo albums. I make stuffed cats. I make decorative hats and floral arrangements out of dried flowers and silk."
FEATURES
By Elinor J. Brecher and Elinor J. Brecher,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 18, 1996
MIAMI -- Before someone figured out you could toss it into the washer on "delicate," and before the Chinese began cranking it out as $10 T-shirts, silk reigned as the fabric of royalty and the royalty of fabrics. Mystery and grandeur whispered in the sensual sibilance of its name.But in the 15 years since the United States granted China "most favored nation" trading status, silk has become as common -- in every sense of the word -- as synthetics. It owes its popularity as much to China's cheap labor as to Americans' renewed appreciation for natural fibers.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | April 1, 2011
Thousands of years of textile manufacturing have resulted in limitless options for personalizing your home with custom upholstery, window treatments, pillows, and bedding. What's important about selecting fabrics is determining which ones work in different situations. To find out what materials are best for sofas and chairs vs. windows and dining areas, I talked with a few interior designers in the region to get some expert advice. I've organized that advice into three categories: upholstery, window treatments and trends.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 1, 1993
The aged wire cage elevator edges up the five floors until it reaches a dim landing. Then the folding scissors-spring gate opens to the world of L. Mayers & Son Inc., one of Baltimore's few surviving downtown necktie makers.The firm occupies two floors of the landmark Abell Building, a Victorian repository of the needle industry at Baltimore and Eutaw. It's just south of the old Hippodrome Theater, the New York Sewing Machine Co. and the surviving handful of hatters, button and zipper stores often overlooked by only but the most serious sewers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO and MARC SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
Andre "Silk" Poole knows that success does not come without sacrifice. While he was captain of the Community College of Baltimore County, Essex campus basketball team, Division 1 schools were courting him. Georgetown and Xavier universities were his final choices, but when his grandmother fell ill, he decided to stay home to take care of her, he said. "It was a tough thing, but at the same time, I don't regret it at all," Poole said. "I love her to death." She was on dialysis for 16 years before passing away.
FEATURES
By CATHERINE COOK | September 22, 1991
The shapes are familiar, but the fabrics make the differenc this season. Old favorites like the motorcycle jacket get refinished in metallics, denim, silk, vinyl and even velvet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | June 3, 2014
A fancy drink without frills, enjoyed in a no-frills bar -- I'm a huge fan of this seemingly new trend around Baltimore. The idea that a non-beer-drinker such as myself can still class it up while my buddies enjoy cold ones and an O's game is pretty much the perfect cocktail storm in my book. Even more so when that friendly neighborhood bar is blocks away from my home, serving up a little gem known as the Pear-Fection. Silks, newly renovated in March after years of curious neglect, is unassuming in the best way. The tenders are friendly and quick with their service, its pub fare is more than fair, and the bar is kept stocked with an eclectic range of local and nationally known products.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | April 16, 2014
For years, Silks was a mysterious eyesore in Canton. In 2009, Midnight Sun contributor Evan Siple painted an unusual picture of a previous visit. While Silks appeared to be a sports bar from the exterior, the inside was an “extension of the owner's house.” The main door was locked, stacks of mail were scattered and the owner wore pajama pants and slippers behind the bar. A friend in search of a bathroom mistakenly entered a living room. The writer's verdict? Silks, seemingly a semi-private hangout, was “crazier than crazy.” Unsurprisingly, that business plan did not last.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
As details continue to emerge about the two year-investigation into Ross William Ulbricht, an unassuming 29-year-old and alleged founder of the massive online drug market Silk Road, one important piece of information remains cloaked in shadow: How did the FBI find the organization's servers? Court documents offer only the barest of details. "The FBI has located in a certain foreign country the server used to host Silk Road's website," an agent wrote in charging documents against Ulbricht, who was charged by a grand jury in Maryland with conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance and attempted witness murder, among other charges.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
A federal judge in Manhattan denied bail Thursday to Ross Ulbricht after federal prosecutors alleged that he plotted six killings earlier this year to protect his position as the operator of the sprawling online drug market Silk Road. Assistant U.S. Attorney Serrin Turner said it's not clear whether five of the intended victims actually exist. But Turner argued that Ulbricht could not be released without endangering the public or running the risk that he would flee. He said the 29-year-old had explored obtaining citizenship in another country and ordered fake identity documents.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun and By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
As they rushed toward a suburban Utah home with guns drawn, agents knew they were on to a significant figure in the  Silk   Road  online drug bazaar -- a major cocaine dealer, perhaps.  Message boards on  Silk   Road  -- the world's most popular online drug market -- had been buzzing about the sale that triggered this bust. Users of the encrypted website advertised drugs, forged documents and hacking tools for sale through seemingly anonymous transactions, but a kilo of pure Peruvian cocaine was something special.  Federal authorities in Baltimore had been working for a year to breach the inner circle of  Silk   Road's  kingpin, whom they knew only by the alias Dread Pirate Roberts.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
An administrator with wide-ranging access to the supposedly secret transactions on the Silk Road online market pleaded guilty to a drug charge Thursday in Baltimore after he was caught in a federal sting in January. Curtis Clark Green, 47, was unmasked as postal inspectors delivered a kilogram of cocaine to his Utah home. He had given his address to an undercover agent. Green's plea agreement reveals more details about how federal agents in Maryland closed in on the operators of the shadowy Internet site over the course of two years and built cases against its users and administrators.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2003
Mercedes Linton Shriver, an ardent environmentalist and an artist whose designer silk wraps are sold worldwide, died Wednesday of internal injuries after a fall down a cliff while hiking one of her favorite trails near her home in Saint-Barthelemy. She was 41 and had lived on the small Caribbean island in the French West Indies for about five years. Born in Baltimore and known as Merc, Ms. Shriver was a graduate of Maryvale Preparatory School and studied art later at a variety of places, including the Maryland Institute College of Art, the San Francisco Art Institute and the Telluride AhHa School.
NEWS
October 28, 2004
A. David Mazzone, 76, the federal judge who guided the massive cleanup of Boston Harbor, died of cancer complications Monday in Wakefield, Mass. In 1985, Judge Mazzone ruled wastewater discharges into Boston Harbor by the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority violated the federal Clean Water Act. The decision set in motion the continuing cleanup. George Silk, 87, a photojournalist who spent 30 years with Life magazine, earning fame for coverage of World War II, died Saturday in New York.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
An Edgewood drug dealer pleaded guilty Tuesday in federal court to supplying customers around the world through the Silk Road online marketplace. Jacob Theodore George IV, 32, admitted to agents with the Department of Homeland Security in January 2012 that he sold heroin and methylone — a synthetic drug often marketed as "bath salts" — using the hidden site. Silk Road was taken down and its alleged founder arrested at a San Francisco library early last month. George's attorney said he had been in custody since last year, but the charges against him were not filed until after the bust.
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