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NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | November 20, 1991
IT IS not often that one can see naked professional self-interest on display in public. But the current battle over whether the Food and Drug Administration should ban breast implants made of silicone gel is about as close as you can get.At least 2 million women in the United States have had silicone-gel breast implants. More than 75 percent of them just wanted biggerbreasts. A large number of American men find women with large breasts attractive, and women know this.It is important to add that a smaller but growing percentage of women have had implants for other reasons.
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NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - Pamela Dowd drove her 20-year-old motor home 2,500 miles from Boise, Idaho, to tell a government panel how her silicone breast implants led to health problems that have sapped her vitality and made her medically uninsurable. Terry Heide took time off from her Pentagon job to urge just as forcefully that women be allowed to make their own decisions about the risks and benefits of silicone gel implants, which many believe have a more natural look and feel than the available saline-filled ones.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 2, 1992
LONDON -- Britain's chief medical officer has told doctors that they can continue to use silicone gel breast implants despite a temporary suspension of the procedure in the United States.Last month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommended a 45-day moratorium on the supply or use of silicone gel implants while new information questioning their safety is evaluated. Concerns focus on the possibility of reactions in the immune system caused by a leakage of silicone."I understand the concerns and anxiety felt by women over silicone gel breast implants," said Dr. Kenneth Calman, the Department of Health's chief medical officer.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2004
To Dr. Sheri Slezak, the Food and Drug Administration's 1992 hearings on silicone-gel breast implants seemed more like a political convention than a gathering of scientific minds. Attendees donned buttons and waved signs, like party faithful pushing candidates. "People emotionally and fervently believe in whatever side they are on," said Slezak, an associate professor of plastic surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. More than 11 years after the FDA banned the sale of the implants for general use, that remains as true as ever.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 31, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration, which is expected to announce within days whether it will allow widely used silicone gel breast implants to remain on the market, said yesterday that the biggest manufacturer of the devices has been giving consumers false and misleading information about the implants' safety.The FDA warned Dow Corning Wright Co., based in Midland, Mich., to immediately stop disseminating the false information on its toll-free hot line and ordered the company to notify the agency by Thursday of corrective steps it has taken.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration has told Dow Corning Corp. to make public approximately 90 documents on silicone gel breast implants, but company officials said yesterday that the company might not comply.Dr. James S. Benson, the chief FDA official in charge of medical devices, told the company that the agency would disclose the documents if the company did not do so by tomorrow.Based on the documents and new information, Dr. David A. Kessler, the FDA commissioner, called for a moratorium Jan. 6 on the sale and use of silicone gel implants.
NEWS
By Dick Stanley and Dick Stanley,Cox News Service | May 15, 1992
AUSTIN, Texas -- Marlene Hooker was so distraught over her silicone gel breast implants that she slashed her own breast open to force surgeons to remove them."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
Within 24 hours of an announcement that the government would allow 50 women across the country to try a new breast implant filled with soybean oil, hundreds of women were phoning doctors' offices to register their interest.Dr. Ronald Schuster, an Owings Mills plastic surgeon who will fit 10 patients with the device, said yesterday that his office had received calls from 100 women wishing to take part in a safety experiment.That response, however, was nothing compared with the 1,000 calls that flooded a medical practice in Van Nuys, Calif.
NEWS
By Gregory Spears and Gregory Spears,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 15, 1991
GAITHERSBURG -- A Food and Drug Administration advisory panel voted unanimously yesterday to recommend keeping silicone gel breast implants on the market despite concluding that the devices have not been proved safe.The panelists said additional information on the popular implants used in elective cosmetic breast surgery should be gathered as rapidly as possible to answer lingering questions about their safety.Witnesses testified that the implants could cause severe allergic reactions in a few women and that tests linking the devices to other illnesses, including lung cancer, were inconclusive.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - Pamela Dowd drove her 20-year-old motor home 2,500 miles from Boise, Idaho, to tell a government panel how her silicone breast implants led to health problems that have sapped her vitality and made her medically uninsurable. Terry Heide took time off from her Pentagon job to urge just as forcefully that women be allowed to make their own decisions about the risks and benefits of silicone gel implants, which many believe have a more natural look and feel than the available saline-filled ones.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | September 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Dow Corning Corp. today will begin an $8 million advertising campaign alerting customers of their last chance to file injury claims against the company.The 50-50 joint venture of Dow Chemical Inc. and Corning Inc., facing more than 19,000 claims that its silicone-gel breast implants caused injury or disease in women, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in May 1995.Now the company is trying to make hundreds of thousands of potential plaintiffs aware of a Jan. 15, 1997, deadline for all U.S. claims and a Feb. 14, 1997, deadline for claims outside of the U.S."
NEWS
By Joanne Jacobs | August 7, 1996
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Sorry. Never mind.After four years of hysteria about silicone breast implants, after thousands of terrified women had their implants removed, after millions in lawsuits and Dow Corning's bankruptcy, the scientific evidence is in.A Food and Drug Administration review of 15 studies found that no study has indicated a significant increase in breast cancer or connective-tissue disease.The ''time bomb in the breasts,'' as one magazine called it, turned out to be a dud. ''The cause and effect is simply not there,'' says FDA Commissioner David Kessler, who banned silicone breast implants for most uses in 1992.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
Within 24 hours of an announcement that the government would allow 50 women across the country to try a new breast implant filled with soybean oil, hundreds of women were phoning doctors' offices to register their interest.Dr. Ronald Schuster, an Owings Mills plastic surgeon who will fit 10 patients with the device, said yesterday that his office had received calls from 100 women wishing to take part in a safety experiment.That response, however, was nothing compared with the 1,000 calls that flooded a medical practice in Van Nuys, Calif.
NEWS
By Dick Stanley and Dick Stanley,Cox News Service | May 15, 1992
AUSTIN, Texas -- Marlene Hooker was so distraught over her silicone gel breast implants that she slashed her own breast open to force surgeons to remove them."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | April 17, 1992
Despite a federal ruling that makes silicone gel implants widely available to women losing a breast to cancer, the lingering fear left by months of rancorous debate will probably cause most patients to choose other methods of breast reconstruction.That is the view of many plastic surgeons who said yesterday that they doubted the Food and Drug Administration's decision to give cancer patients the right to choose silicone gel would ease fears over the implants' safety.The FDA ruling, announced yesterday, gives cancer patients access to silicone gel implants as long as they enter studies designed to answer safety questions.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 16, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Silicone gel breast implants, one of the most popular cosmetic surgeries in the United States, will be available only to a limited number of women who will test their safety, FDA Commissioner David Kessler is to announce today.Breast cancer patients and those disfigured by birth defects or injuries will have the best chance to obtain the implants if their doctor is convinced it is necessary for their well-being, a Food and Drug Administration official familiar with the plan said.
NEWS
By Joanne Jacobs | August 7, 1996
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Sorry. Never mind.After four years of hysteria about silicone breast implants, after thousands of terrified women had their implants removed, after millions in lawsuits and Dow Corning's bankruptcy, the scientific evidence is in.A Food and Drug Administration review of 15 studies found that no study has indicated a significant increase in breast cancer or connective-tissue disease.The ''time bomb in the breasts,'' as one magazine called it, turned out to be a dud. ''The cause and effect is simply not there,'' says FDA Commissioner David Kessler, who banned silicone breast implants for most uses in 1992.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- For Dr. David A. Kessler, the decision on whether silicone gel breast implants are safe for women will be the most difficult of his first year as head of the Food and Drug Administration.After three days of conflicting testimony from implant recipients, manufacturers and doctors, the implant issue arrived last week in his "urgent" in-basket.Dr. Kessler has until Jan. 6 to make a decision on whether to ban breast implants or allow their continued general or limited use. An FDA advisory panel voted to keep silicone gel breast implants on the market despite questions about their safety.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | March 21, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A bill requiring Maryland doctors to comply with federal rules on silicone gel breast implants cleared the House of Delegates yesterday, in the wake of nationwide complaints that the implants may harm women's health.The 123-5 vote came a day after Dow Corning Corp., a leading maker of such breast implants, announced it was leaving the implant business because bad publicity had made it unprofitable.The Maryland bill, which now goes to the state Senate, requires physicians who insert breast implants containing silicone gel to follow the regulations and recommendations of the federal Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 2, 1992
LONDON -- Britain's chief medical officer has told doctors that they can continue to use silicone gel breast implants despite a temporary suspension of the procedure in the United States.Last month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommended a 45-day moratorium on the supply or use of silicone gel implants while new information questioning their safety is evaluated. Concerns focus on the possibility of reactions in the immune system caused by a leakage of silicone."I understand the concerns and anxiety felt by women over silicone gel breast implants," said Dr. Kenneth Calman, the Department of Health's chief medical officer.
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