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Silicone Breast Implants

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By New York Times News Service | June 22, 1995
The most definitive study yet of the health effects of silicone breast implants has found no association between the implants and connective tissue diseases.The new study is so compelling and its results so consistent with previous studies, some leading rheumatologists contend, that the issue of whether implants cause those diseases can be considered closed. They maintain that it is time for the Food and Drug Administration to lift the voluntary moratorium on sales of the implants, which it requested in 1992.
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NEWS
By Melissa Healy and Melissa Healy,Los Angeles Times | December 1, 2006
The days around a holiday are typically quiet in the offices of plastic surgeons. But a long-awaited decision to approve silicone breast implants for women older than 22 has prompted a flurry of excited calls and inquiries from prospective patients. The giddy welcome may not last. Even as the two U.S. manufacturers of silicone implants gleefully projected a surge in demand for their products, physicians began poring over the fine print of the Food and Drug Administration's recommendation and finding reasons for caution.
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NEWS
October 26, 1994
An article in yesterday's Sun should have stated that manufacturers of silicone breast implants have agreed to pay $4.3 billion into a settlement fund to compensate women claiming injuries.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - Not so long ago, the Food and Drug Administration could be counted on to approve a new drug or medical device - and approve it with some speed - if its advisory committee recommended it do so. But these days, facing intense scrutiny, political pressure and criticism that it has rushed harmful drugs to market and cozied up to the pharmaceutical industry, the agency appears to be adopting a more cautious, conservative stance and shifting its...
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau | March 15, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A House committee yesterday approved a weakened version of a bill designed to limit silicone breast implants in Maryland.The Environmental Matters Committee voted 16-4 for a bill requiring physicians to comply with Food and Drug Administration requirements on silicone breast implants. Under the bill, a doctor who violates those requirements would be subject to disciplinary action in Maryland.Introduced by Del. Joan B. Pitkin, a Prince George's Democrat, the bill originally had called for a temporary statewide ban on the implants in the wake of concerns about their safety.
NEWS
By Rena Selya | December 12, 1995
NEW YORK -- Millions of American women rely on the health information that appears each month in the women's magazines. I recently reviewed 24 articles in 13 of these magazines published between 1989 and 1995, looking for information about the safety of silicone breast implants. What I found was a frightening array of inaccuracies and disinformation.Most of the articles on silicone breast implants claimed that they are dangerous and cause a variety of health problems.A 1989 Vogue article cataloged the alleged effects of silicone implants on the immune system and connective tissue.
NEWS
By Joanne Jacobs | August 7, 1996
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Sorry. Never mind.After four years of hysteria about silicone breast implants, after thousands of terrified women had their implants removed, after millions in lawsuits and Dow Corning's bankruptcy, the scientific evidence is in.A Food and Drug Administration review of 15 studies found that no study has indicated a significant increase in breast cancer or connective-tissue disease.The ''time bomb in the breasts,'' as one magazine called it, turned out to be a dud. ''The cause and effect is simply not there,'' says FDA Commissioner David Kessler, who banned silicone breast implants for most uses in 1992.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 1998
Dow Corning Corp. and lawyers for women claiming injury from silicone breast implants agreed yesterday to a $3.2 billion settlement, a long-awaited step toward ending one of the most heated disputes in American corporate history.The agreement, which if accepted would end a nearly 10-year legal battle, would allow women seeking damages because of implants to receive money as early as next year.It would enable Dow Corning, a joint venture of Dow Chemical Co. and Corning Inc., to emerge from Chapter 11 bankruptcy, which Dow Corning entered for protection from as many as 19,000 implant-damage suits.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 21, 1999
An independent panel of 13 scientists convened by the Institute of Medicine at the request of Congress has concluded that silicone breast implants do not cause any major diseases."
NEWS
By John Meroney and Patricia Beauchamp | October 17, 2003
WASHINGTON -- When the Food and Drug Administration is deciding if a medical device is safe, should it be swayed more by scientific studies or anecdotal evidence? That's the issue confronting the FDA as it weighs whether to follow an advisory panel's advice and allow silicone breast implants to be reintroduced into the marketplace. This week, a special FDA advisory panel convened in Gaithersburg to consider if a new implant made by the California-based Inamed Corp. should be available to consumers.
NEWS
April 14, 2005
NATIONAL FDA on silicone breast implants A day after rejecting another company's proposal, a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel recommended yesterday that silicone breast implants made by Mentor Corp. be approved with conditions for women having cosmetic surgery. [Page 1a] Guilty plea in Olympic bombing Striking a bargain to escape the death penalty, Eric Rudolph pleaded guilty yesterday to bombing the 1996 Atlanta Olympics and carrying out three other attacks on abortion clinics and a gay nightclub.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - Pamela Dowd drove her 20-year-old motor home 2,500 miles from Boise, Idaho, to tell a government panel how her silicone breast implants led to health problems that have sapped her vitality and made her medically uninsurable. Terry Heide took time off from her Pentagon job to urge just as forcefully that women be allowed to make their own decisions about the risks and benefits of silicone gel implants, which many believe have a more natural look and feel than the available saline-filled ones.
NEWS
By John Meroney and Patricia Beauchamp | October 17, 2003
WASHINGTON -- When the Food and Drug Administration is deciding if a medical device is safe, should it be swayed more by scientific studies or anecdotal evidence? That's the issue confronting the FDA as it weighs whether to follow an advisory panel's advice and allow silicone breast implants to be reintroduced into the marketplace. This week, a special FDA advisory panel convened in Gaithersburg to consider if a new implant made by the California-based Inamed Corp. should be available to consumers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 16, 2003
In a 9-6 vote, an advisory panel to the Food and Drug Administration recommended yesterday that silicone breast implants be allowed back on the market after an 11-year hiatus. But concerned about the dearth of data on the safety of the silicone implants and their durability over a decade or more, the panel said its approval was contingent on a list of conditions, such as education of surgeons and patients and continued monitoring of women who receive implants. The implant maker, Inamed, had volunteered to meet most of those conditions in seeking the agency's approval.
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and By Jane E. Allen,Special to the Sun | February 2, 2003
For more than a decade, silicone breast implants have been banned in the United States, pulled from the market amid claims that they made women ill. By the mid-1990s, the devices had become a symbol of what many regarded as corporate America's indifference to women's health, with one company, Dow Corning, eventually filing for bankruptcy protection. Now, silicone implants are poised for a comeback. With no fanfare, longtime implant maker Inamed Inc. has taken the first step toward returning the gel-filled devices to the marketplace.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 21, 1999
An independent panel of 13 scientists convened by the Institute of Medicine at the request of Congress has concluded that silicone breast implants do not cause any major diseases."
NEWS
By Patricia Anstett and Patricia Anstett,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 22, 1992
Representatives of a plastic surgery group left out part of the story this week when they assured a federal advisory panel that women in need would receive financial aid for the removal of silicone breast implants for medical reasons.It turns out that the help is from a loan agency that charges 16.9 percent interest, and the American Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons Inc. pockets a profit from the deal.That's not the way it sounded when Dr. Garry Brody, the society's secretary, told the Food and Drug Administration advisory panel: "I can assure you, financial help will be available to any woman."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | October 25, 1994
An article in yesterday's Sun should have stated that manufacturers of silicone breast implants have agreed to pay $4.3 billion into a settlement fund to compensate women claiming injuries.The Sun regrets the error.Two new studies have found that women with silicone-gel breast implants are no more likely to develop connective tissue diseases than are women who do not have the implants.Researchers at the University of Maryland Medical Center found no link between the implants and one of the diseases -- scleroderma.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 1998
Dow Corning Corp. and lawyers for women claiming injury from silicone breast implants agreed yesterday to a $3.2 billion settlement, a long-awaited step toward ending one of the most heated disputes in American corporate history.The agreement, which if accepted would end a nearly 10-year legal battle, would allow women seeking damages because of implants to receive money as early as next year.It would enable Dow Corning, a joint venture of Dow Chemical Co. and Corning Inc., to emerge from Chapter 11 bankruptcy, which Dow Corning entered for protection from as many as 19,000 implant-damage suits.
NEWS
By Joanne Jacobs | August 7, 1996
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Sorry. Never mind.After four years of hysteria about silicone breast implants, after thousands of terrified women had their implants removed, after millions in lawsuits and Dow Corning's bankruptcy, the scientific evidence is in.A Food and Drug Administration review of 15 studies found that no study has indicated a significant increase in breast cancer or connective-tissue disease.The ''time bomb in the breasts,'' as one magazine called it, turned out to be a dud. ''The cause and effect is simply not there,'' says FDA Commissioner David Kessler, who banned silicone breast implants for most uses in 1992.
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