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BUSINESS
By Sean Silverthorne and Sean Silverthorne,Palo Alto Peninsula Times Tribune | December 27, 1991
PALO ALTO, Calif. -- Questioned a year ago, many local computer executives would have told you the recession was having little effect on their businesses. Ask them today, and you'll get a much different answer.The economic recession of 1990-1991 has helped change the computer business, and Silicon Valley, forever.The valley has shone through several recessions in the past, most notably a regional turndown in 1985 when tens of thousands of high-tech workers in the San Francisco Bay area were handed pink slips.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Whenever Baltimore-area companies sell themselves to out-of-state firms, economists and local leaders alike bemoan the loss. Another headquarters gone. Fewer corporate decision-makers here. Possible job cuts. But Silicon Valley's deals for two Columbia firms - the planned Micros Systems acquisition, announced last week, and Sourcefire last year - strike local entrepreneurs in an entirely different way. They want more California tech giants doing business here, more billion-dollar-plus acquisitions.
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BUSINESS
By Jolie Solomon and Jolie Solomon,Boston Globe | June 22, 1992
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- At General Magic, a young computer company here, Bowser -- resident rabbit and mascot -- has his own nameplate on the wall. Conference rooms have names such as Willy Wonka, and night-owl engineers nap on futons in a corner of the office.Is this Silicon Valley 1982, or 1992?Well, it is 1992, and this 2-year-old company is an example of the kind of start-up that gave Silicon Valley its global reputation not only for huge productivity but also for a new brand of creative energy.
NEWS
January 31, 2014
Consider not only the good news, but the overarching theme that was conveyed in the recent editorial, "Building a more entrepreneurial Maryland" (Jan. 27): Those of us who are determined to make Maryland a top-notch home for starts-ups and businesses of all kinds are working together toward this goal like never before. We are determined. Clearly, our legislators and Gov. Martin O'Malley are making a concerted effort to bolster diverse job growth, while advocacy groups like the Greater Baltimore Committee and TEDCO have created forums to move the discussion forward.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
Derek Gabbard wasn't dreaming of California when he sought to raise investment capital for his Baltimore-based cybersecurity firm. But the CEO of Lookingglass Cyber Solutions lucked out with a connection to venture capitalists in the state that dwarfs all others in terms of venture capital. With a San Francisco investment firm taking the lead on the investment and a Maryland firm following, Gabbard recently raised $5 million. Such deals, where Mid-Atlantic technology companies straddle both coasts for investors, have been cropping up lately, though the dynamics underlying them vary.
FEATURES
By Neil A. Lewis and Neil A. Lewis,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 3, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In Thinktankland, the main attractions are by now wearyingly familiar. The conservative Heritage Foundation and the American Enterprise Institute and the liberal Brookings Institution along with several others have for years competed to convert their ideas about taxes, foreign policy, the environment or whatever into policy in the real world. But since the beginning of this year, a new entry in the public-policy community, the New America Foundation, has been trying to provide something different.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 25, 1991
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- One of Silicon Valley's least-known but most striking success stories isn't in the valley at all but high on a hill overlooking Santa Cruz.Considering the accomplishments of the Santa Cruz Operation during the 12 years since its founding, one would think that these should be the very best of times.SCO pioneered and now dominates one of computing's fastest-growing niches -- putting the Unix operating system on Intel-based desktop computers. Thousands of businesses, from small floral shops and real estate offices to huge chains such as Radio Shack and Taco Bell, run big chunks of their operations on SCO software every day.Privately held SCO's revenues were $135 million for its most recent fiscal year, up 30 percent from last year, putting it in the top flight of U.S. software companies.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 13, 1997
NEW YORK -- Everything about Jaime Levy and her start-up Internet services company seems raw and new. She talks less like a CEO and more like a Greenwich Village diva. Her four employees work out of an old machine shop on West 25th Street. Her creative director alternates between designing World Wide Web sites and adding plaster to the walls.But at age 31, with seven years of experience in new media, Levy is among the oldest and most successful of the old guard in Silicon Alley, the name given to lower Manhattan's quirky, artsy alternative to the great valley of silicon out West.
BUSINESS
By Peter Delevett and Peter Delevett,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 27, 2002
SAN JOSE, Calif. - Jacques Nasser sounds like a man ready to leave cold Detroit winters behind. En route to a surf trip to his native Australia last month, the former chief executive of Ford Motor Co. quietly swung through Menlo Park, Calif., to confab with some top tech investors. In his first interview since resigning from Ford under pressure last fall, Nasser admits he's intrigued by the possibility of running a Silicon Valley company. "One of the areas that has always fascinated me, particularly over the last few years, was technology and the way it's brought to market," said Nasser, who spent 34 years at Ford before being forced out amid plunging profitability and market share.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 1, 1993
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Digital Equipment Corp., which watched Silicon Valley's personal computer juggernaut crush its minicomputer business, now hopes it can best some of the valley's biggest companies in another battle: disk drives.The Maynard, Mass., company has announced four new disk drives as part of a plan to dominate the large-capacity high end of the market and compete head-on with emerging products from Silicon Valley heavyweights such as Seagate Technology Inc., Maxtor Inc., Conner Peripherals and Quantum Corp.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2014
Venture capital funds flooded into companies last year in the Baltimore-Washington corridor, more than doubling to $1.54 billion, according to a new report to be released Friday. The region ranked fifth among those tracked - behind California's Silicon Valley, New England, and the New York City and Los Angeles metro areas - by the MoneyTree Report prepared by PriceWaterhouseCoopers LLP and the National Venture Capital Association. Nationwide, venture capital investing grew 7.5 percent to $29.4 billion in 2013, according to the report, which uses data from Thomson Reuters.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
The venture capitalists at Accel Partners fly around the world to find hot companies ripe for investment. The Silicon Valley-based firm was the first major investor in Facebook years ago, and its portfolio is a Who's Who of fast-growing technology enterprises. But a few years ago, a little company in Columbia called Tenable Network Security Inc. caught the eye of Accel's executives. They followed Tenable closely as it steadily emerged as a top player in cybersecurity. Then, in September, the bombshell: Accel decided to pump $50 million into Tenable, a staggering amount even by venture capital standards and the biggest investment that Accel has ever made in a North American company.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2012
Loyola University Maryland is expected to announce Tuesday a partnership with a Silicon Valley-based venture capital firm for a startup accelerator that will help students quickly form new companies — one of a handful of such programs recently launched in the Baltimore area. Wasabi Ventures will work with the university to attract and mentor students into the accelerator program. The venture firm will provide professional staff to manage the program, oversee funding for new companies, and offer internships.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
Derek Gabbard wasn't dreaming of California when he sought to raise investment capital for his Baltimore-based cybersecurity firm. But the CEO of Lookingglass Cyber Solutions lucked out with a connection to venture capitalists in the state that dwarfs all others in terms of venture capital. With a San Francisco investment firm taking the lead on the investment and a Maryland firm following, Gabbard recently raised $5 million. Such deals, where Mid-Atlantic technology companies straddle both coasts for investors, have been cropping up lately, though the dynamics underlying them vary.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
Thanks to demand from the defense sector, the vacancy rate for office space in Baltimore's suburbs is lower than anywhere else in the United States except for two suburban markets in California, a new commercial real estate report shows. Suburban Baltimore had an office vacancy rate of 14 percent, according to an overview of the mid-Atlantic commercial market released this month by Cushman & Wakefield, a commercial real estate firm that operates nationwide. That's lower than any other suburban market the firm tracks except for two high-tech hotbeds: the San Francisco peninsula, which has an 11.6 percent vacancy rate, and Silicon Valley, with a 12.7 percent rate.
NEWS
By Erica Schoenberger | November 21, 2011
Those who think the government shouldn't be promoting energy innovation have short memories. The federal government's satellite and ballistic missile program spillovers are what brought us Silicon Valley. The energy program spillovers are going to land someplace else. Bringing about a technological and industrial revolution requires a huge commitment of collective resources as well as private initiative. It requires fundamental research, well ahead of the possibility of commercialization.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | October 28, 1993
Silicon Valley Bank considers Md. branchKenneth P. Wilcox, mixing and schmoozing with the best of them at the Mid-Atlantic Venture Fair earlier this week, could have been mistaken for any of the hundreds of venture capitalists.But he's no venture capitalist -- he's a banker, one of the few who bothered to come to the fair. That's because Mr. Wilcox's company is the 10-year-old Silicon Valley Bank, based in Santa Clara, Calif. His interest in the Baltimore venture fair, which attracted companies from the Mid-Atlantic region, is an indication that the bank is considering opening a branch in Maryland.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1993
U.S. launches bonds probeThe Justice Department has started an investigation of the government securities market, hunting for evidence of possible collusion among large bond dealers, officials said.The inquiry is the latest in a series of government probles into trading practices in the multitrillion dollar market for government bonds, notes and bills, and stems directly from the Treasury auction cheating scandal that ensnared Salomon Inc. in 1991. Department officials acknowledged the probe yesterday.
BUSINESS
By John Boudreau and John Boudreau,San Jose Mercury News | April 29, 2008
HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam - Intel's billion-dollar Vietnam bet along the Hanoi Highway - its biggest semiconductor manufacturing plant ever - is rising from the flatlands of former rice fields. The Santa Clara, Calif., chip giant jolted the tech world two years ago when it announced it would build a huge assembly factory in this Southeast Asian country known more for making shoes and growing crops than assembling key PC components. Intel Corp. picked Vietnam, a nation of 85 million that lacks a single world-class university, over India, whose army of engineers has reordered the global software industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Anne Ostrom and Mary Anne Ostrom,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 12, 2003
SAN JOSE, Calif. - When NASA launched its mission to Mars this week, lots of Silicon Valley folks were watching. That's because two valley companies have been working to boost the space agency's online capabilities before January, when two unmanned rovers will land on the Red Planet. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration wants to be prepared for a global online rush when the agency attempts to Webcast real-time streaming video from Mars, the first such online event highlighting exploration of a celestial body.
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