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By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 31, 1997
In a ruling that may force the U.S. Supreme Court to examine 1995 congressional reforms aimed at curbing securities lawsuits, San Francisco federal judge has dismissed a class-action suit against Silicon Graphics Inc. and left a mere crack in the courthouse door for investors suing over stock market fraud.U.S. District Judge Fern Smith, in what is believed to be the most comprehensive decision on the subject to date, concluded last week that the federal reforms severely restrict how investors may sue for securities violations.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 25, 2005
WASHINGTON - James Clark, the Internet pioneer who co-founded Netscape Communications Corp., plans to start marketing computer software that he developed to automate his two yachts and Florida mansion. Clark formed closely held CommandScape Inc. in Redwood City, Calif., to determine whether there's demand for the software. He put $6.7 million of his money into CommandScape and raised about $5 million from investors for the company, which Clark estimates may one day generate revenue of as much as $50 million.
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BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 21, 1993
Forget the dinosaurs. The real stars of "Jurassic Park" are the computers -- on screen and behind the camera -- that created the look and feel of this year's biggest blockbuster movie.On screen* APPLE: The control room for Jurassic Park, where the main characters seek refuge from rampaging reptiles, is packed with Quadra computers from Apple Computer Inc. of Cupertino, Calif. Look for a PowerBook in the Montana trailer-office where dinosaur scientists Sam Neill and Laura Dern first meet Jurassic Park owner Richard Attenborough.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 31, 1997
In a ruling that may force the U.S. Supreme Court to examine 1995 congressional reforms aimed at curbing securities lawsuits, San Francisco federal judge has dismissed a class-action suit against Silicon Graphics Inc. and left a mere crack in the courthouse door for investors suing over stock market fraud.U.S. District Judge Fern Smith, in what is believed to be the most comprehensive decision on the subject to date, concluded last week that the federal reforms severely restrict how investors may sue for securities violations.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1994
AT&T, Silicon Graphics join forcesAT&T Corp. and Silicon Graphics Inc. plan to announce an alliance today aimed at developing and marketing networks that deliver interactive television and on-line computer services into the home, the New York Times reported yesterday.The alliance brings together two powerful suppliers in the race between telephone and cable television companies to build multimedia networks, like those being built by Bell Atlantic Corp. the mid-Atlantic states and by Time Warner Inc. in Orlando, Fla.People familiar with the plans said Mountain View, Calif.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 25, 2005
WASHINGTON - James Clark, the Internet pioneer who co-founded Netscape Communications Corp., plans to start marketing computer software that he developed to automate his two yachts and Florida mansion. Clark formed closely held CommandScape Inc. in Redwood City, Calif., to determine whether there's demand for the software. He put $6.7 million of his money into CommandScape and raised about $5 million from investors for the company, which Clark estimates may one day generate revenue of as much as $50 million.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1993
Airline passengers get OK to sueA federal appeals court in San Francisco has ruled that airline passengers can sue for damages if they are prevented from boarding overbooked flights for which they have a valid ticket. But major carriers said yesterday that they expect little if any change in their advance booking procedures.Andrew's cost rises to $18 billionThe world's costliest natural disaster is getting even more expensive.The toll for insured claims from Hurricane Andrew has gone up $3 billion, to $18 billion, the Florida Insurance Commissioner said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | January 26, 1994
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- The interview took place in the "Total Recall" conference room of Silicon Graphics Inc.'s headquarters, which shouldn't be confused with the conference rooms upstairs bearing the titles "Terminator II" or "Beauty and the Beast."For the moment, Edward McCracken, SGI president and chief executive, wasn't discussing those films, for which his super-fast 3-D graphics machines generated special effects and animation, turning "morphing" into a generally recognized term.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | October 21, 1995
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks retreated yesterday amid a slump in technology and financial issues, just one day after setting records.Personal computer stocks recoiled from warnings by Silicon Graphics Inc. about future growth, semiconductor issues were hurt by a slide in LSI Logic Corp. and financial shares tumbled after Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan suggested that interest rates might not be cut soon.Mr. Greenspan said small wage increases that had helped curb inflation may give way to larger, more inflationary settlements.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | July 11, 1994
IBM teaches us to get closer to our customers. Then its customers change (from mainframes to PCs and workstations), and Big Blue is left holding the bag -- and 200,000 surplus employees. So much for close to the customer.Focusing on core competencies (skills, not products) is another hot management strategy. But in his new book, "Mastering the Dynamics of Innovation," MIT Professor Jim Utterback offers irrefutable evidence that most leading companies "follow their core technologies into obsolescence and obscurity."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | October 21, 1995
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks retreated yesterday amid a slump in technology and financial issues, just one day after setting records.Personal computer stocks recoiled from warnings by Silicon Graphics Inc. about future growth, semiconductor issues were hurt by a slide in LSI Logic Corp. and financial shares tumbled after Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan suggested that interest rates might not be cut soon.Mr. Greenspan said small wage increases that had helped curb inflation may give way to larger, more inflationary settlements.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | July 11, 1994
IBM teaches us to get closer to our customers. Then its customers change (from mainframes to PCs and workstations), and Big Blue is left holding the bag -- and 200,000 surplus employees. So much for close to the customer.Focusing on core competencies (skills, not products) is another hot management strategy. But in his new book, "Mastering the Dynamics of Innovation," MIT Professor Jim Utterback offers irrefutable evidence that most leading companies "follow their core technologies into obsolescence and obscurity."
BUSINESS
June 22, 1994
AT&T, Silicon Graphics join forcesAT&T Corp. and Silicon Graphics Inc. plan to announce an alliance today aimed at developing and marketing networks that deliver interactive television and on-line computer services into the home, the New York Times reported yesterday.The alliance brings together two powerful suppliers in the race between telephone and cable television companies to build multimedia networks, like those being built by Bell Atlantic Corp. the mid-Atlantic states and by Time Warner Inc. in Orlando, Fla.People familiar with the plans said Mountain View, Calif.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | January 26, 1994
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. -- The interview took place in the "Total Recall" conference room of Silicon Graphics Inc.'s headquarters, which shouldn't be confused with the conference rooms upstairs bearing the titles "Terminator II" or "Beauty and the Beast."For the moment, Edward McCracken, SGI president and chief executive, wasn't discussing those films, for which his super-fast 3-D graphics machines generated special effects and animation, turning "morphing" into a generally recognized term.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 21, 1993
Forget the dinosaurs. The real stars of "Jurassic Park" are the computers -- on screen and behind the camera -- that created the look and feel of this year's biggest blockbuster movie.On screen* APPLE: The control room for Jurassic Park, where the main characters seek refuge from rampaging reptiles, is packed with Quadra computers from Apple Computer Inc. of Cupertino, Calif. Look for a PowerBook in the Montana trailer-office where dinosaur scientists Sam Neill and Laura Dern first meet Jurassic Park owner Richard Attenborough.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1993
Airline passengers get OK to sueA federal appeals court in San Francisco has ruled that airline passengers can sue for damages if they are prevented from boarding overbooked flights for which they have a valid ticket. But major carriers said yesterday that they expect little if any change in their advance booking procedures.Andrew's cost rises to $18 billionThe world's costliest natural disaster is getting even more expensive.The toll for insured claims from Hurricane Andrew has gone up $3 billion, to $18 billion, the Florida Insurance Commissioner said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By The Hollywood Reporter | June 2, 1995
In what may be a portent of the digital future, the comedy film "Party Girl" will be transmitted live on the worldwide Internet concurrently with its showing tomorrow at the Seattle International Film Festival.The film is scheduled for release in theaters on June 9.Apple Computer, Silicon Graphics and L.A.-based Internet consulting firm Serve.Net will coordinate the enabling technology. Because of the advanced level of technology nee-ded to receive the compressed images in real time, only a select group of companies and institutions with high-speed Internet links will be able to see the film, and even then it will be in black-and-white.
BUSINESS
By Glenn Rifkin and Glenn Rifkin,New York Times News Service 5/8 5/8 | July 1, 1991
Computer-aided product design is no longer the exclusive province of engineers and technicians. Now, many industrial designers are abandoning their sketch pads and clay models for workstations and innovative software.These powerful new systems accept commands simple enough for novices to master. Some automakers say they can use the new methods to trim their product cycles by months, or more than a year.At the Design Continuum, a Boston firm, industrial designers use a workstation, a powerful desktop computer, to shape a three-dimensional model of a new telephone.
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