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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1997
Turner Classic Movies is offering definitive proof this summer that silents are golden.Not by showing silent movies, which have become something of an acquired taste (although a taste certainly worth acquiring) and demand far more attention than modern audiences are used to giving.Rather, TCM is re-releasing 1979's 13-part series about silent movies that's not only a wonderful primer on silents, but also one of the best documentaries ever."Hollywood: A Celebration of the American Silent Film" lovingly chronicles an art form that was once the most popular entertainment on the planet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2013
It's difficult to imagine what Laura Moriarty's four novels would have been like if she had chosen a place to live other than Kansas, with its endless wheat fields and abundance of ordinary light. Moriarty, 42, focuses her gaze on the most common, everyday things in the world - a single mom cooking a grilled cheese sandwich, a visit to the convenience store - and finds in them characters and events of remarkable depth, complexity and variety. Though the author is a Marine's daughter who was born in Hawaii and spent her childhood in places renowned for their physical beauty, she decided as an adult to settle in Kansas.
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NEWS
September 23, 2000
Helen M. Egan, who played musical accompaniment for silent movies during the 1920s in her native Pennsylvania, died Wednesday of heart failure at her Timonium home. She was 91. As a youth growing up in the coal country of northeastern Pennsylvania, Mrs. Egan, a violinist, and her pianist sister provided musical background for silent movies in theaters in the Pottsville, Pa., area, before the advent of Vitaphone talking pictures in 1927. Born Helen McCann in New Boston, Pa., she was raised in St. Clair, Pa., where she attended public schools and a business school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | May 10, 2009
Long live the consciousness of the pure who can see and hear! That ringing statement by pioneer Soviet filmmaker Dziga Vertov articulates my strongest feeling whenever I watch his silent masterpiece, The Man With the Movie Camera (1929), with a score performed live by the amazing three-man Alloy Orchestra. Attending The Man With the Movie Camera with a crowd alive to every joke and nuance brings home what great movies can do - not just clear the palate but foment a revolution in public taste.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2001
Tucked away in Federal Hill - and in the minds of many an old-timer - is a shell of a grand movie theater built in 1917 during the heyday of silent movies when tickets cost 10 cents. The cavernous McHenry Theatre quickly became the center of the neighborhood social scene and was the last of the area's golden-era movie houses when it closed in 1971. After being dark for three decades, the McHenry Theatre is making a comeback with one last picture show, for one night only. The theater - which opened May 26, 1917, with The Undying Flame starring Olga Petrova - will be converted into technology offices by early next year.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2004
Dr. Harold H. Burns, a retired Mercy Medical Center surgeon who as a young man accompanied silent movies on the piano, died in his sleep of congestive heart failure Saturday at his Towson home. He was 95. Born in Girardville, Pa., he learned piano as a child and soon began playing for silent movies in theaters in eastern Pennsylvania. Family members said that on a trip to Atlantic City, N.J., he saw Al Jolson speak and sing in The Jazz Singer, and decided there was no future in his profession.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2002
Marguerite A. Mergehenn, a music teacher, vocalist and pianist, died in her sleep Tuesday at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. She was 97. She played musical accompaniment for silent movies during the 1920s, sang on WBAL-Radio in the 1930s and, at the end of her life, performed with the Charles Tones Band at Charlestown. Mrs. Mergehenn taught piano and voice for 50 years, beginning in 1946 in a studio in her Hunting Ridge home, and later in Catonsville, where she moved in 1955.
SPORTS
June 30, 1994
Camden Yards isn't the only place in town to witness the drama of baseball. There's always the movie theater. Over the years, baseball has been a theme or backdrop for hundreds of motion pictures, all carefully cataloged in a new book, "Great Baseball Films: From 'Right Off The Bat' to 'A League of Their Own.' "The book traces the history of baseball on film, from silent movies through recent box-office hits. Author Rob Edelman spoke recently with The Sun's Mark Hyman.Q: How many baseball movies are there?
NEWS
By Susan Harpster and Susan Harpster,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 2002
IF YOU'RE in the mood for a walk down Memory Lane, Charlie Chaplin's classic 1931 silent movie, City Lights, is showing at Carroll Baldwin Hall tomorrow night. Admission to the film, presented by the Savage Historical Society, is 5 cents. The evening will begin at 6 p.m. with a social hour. You can buy popcorn and baked goods while Columbia pianist Nancy Berla plays Scott Joplin rags. Wear period clothes if you like, take a camera and have your picture taken with a life-sized portrait of Chaplin, drawn by Jeannette Vollmerhausen of Savage.
NEWS
March 23, 2003
Marvelous Movies and More Slayton House Theatre, Wilde Lake village. Bernice Kish, gallery director and village manager. Information: 410-730- 3987. Marvelous Movies and More is just what its name implies. The classic movie series at Slayton House in Columbia, in its 11th year, offers an array of classic moves from the 1920s through the 1950s. They include comedies, drama, westerns, musicals, foreign films and silent movies. Shows start at 7:30 p.m. Fridays. Each film is followed by a 30-minute audience discussion led by guest presenters.
NEWS
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,Los Angeles Times | April 8, 2007
The Invention of Hugo Cabret By Brian Selznick Scholastic Press / 544 pages / $22.99 On the surface, it sounds like an old-school pre-adolescent storybook: Sensitive orphan lives secretly in Parisian train station, loses an obscure notebook and is launched on an unexpected journey. Even the book's shape - a squat, 3-pound doorstop that would appear more fitting for the collected works of H.G. Wells - seems like a throwback. But for all its retro details, The Invention of Hugo Cabret is more proof that we're living in a post-textual age. Author and illustrator Brian Selznick, a distant cousin of the legendary film producer David O. Selznick, builds the book more from images than words, turning it into a kind of preteen graphic novel: A dozen or so wordless pages can pass with characters running through the station, walking down streets or flipping through old drawings.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | November 13, 2006
Rudolph Valentino was riding across an Arabian sand dune as silent movie organist James Harp concluded a frantic version of the William Tell Overture. The pews at the St. Mark Lutheran Church, built in 1898, vibrated from the dizzying peal of what sounded like 1,000 throbbing pipes. The audience erupted into spontaneous applause as the brass cascade bounced off the stained-glass windows and bejeweled Louis C. Tiffany Studios interior. "You have to use that trumpet sparingly," Harp said in a musical understatement at the conclusion of his bravura performance yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Seth Rosen and Seth Rosen,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2004
In one corner of the cottage, 76-year-old Lee DuBois is lying flat on his back underneath a massive wooden "wind chest," cleaning the dirt from a small pipe. Across the room, Sven Larsen, 87, inspects a tangled web of electrical wires from behind his thick, black-rimmed glasses. Every Tuesday, both men, along with at least 10 other members of the Free State Theatre Organ Society, work diligently to restore and reassemble a 1927 Wurlitzer theater organ. Their makeshift workshop, on the campus of Spring Grove Hospital Center in Catonsville, is lined with rows of 6-foot-high stacks of wooden and metal pipes, and has a lingering scent of recently cut plywood.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2004
Dr. Harold H. Burns, a retired Mercy Medical Center surgeon who as a young man accompanied silent movies on the piano, died in his sleep of congestive heart failure Saturday at his Towson home. He was 95. Born in Girardville, Pa., he learned piano as a child and soon began playing for silent movies in theaters in eastern Pennsylvania. Family members said that on a trip to Atlantic City, N.J., he saw Al Jolson speak and sing in The Jazz Singer, and decided there was no future in his profession.
NEWS
March 23, 2003
Marvelous Movies and More Slayton House Theatre, Wilde Lake village. Bernice Kish, gallery director and village manager. Information: 410-730- 3987. Marvelous Movies and More is just what its name implies. The classic movie series at Slayton House in Columbia, in its 11th year, offers an array of classic moves from the 1920s through the 1950s. They include comedies, drama, westerns, musicals, foreign films and silent movies. Shows start at 7:30 p.m. Fridays. Each film is followed by a 30-minute audience discussion led by guest presenters.
NEWS
By Susan Harpster and Susan Harpster,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 2002
IF YOU'RE in the mood for a walk down Memory Lane, Charlie Chaplin's classic 1931 silent movie, City Lights, is showing at Carroll Baldwin Hall tomorrow night. Admission to the film, presented by the Savage Historical Society, is 5 cents. The evening will begin at 6 p.m. with a social hour. You can buy popcorn and baked goods while Columbia pianist Nancy Berla plays Scott Joplin rags. Wear period clothes if you like, take a camera and have your picture taken with a life-sized portrait of Chaplin, drawn by Jeannette Vollmerhausen of Savage.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | November 13, 2006
Rudolph Valentino was riding across an Arabian sand dune as silent movie organist James Harp concluded a frantic version of the William Tell Overture. The pews at the St. Mark Lutheran Church, built in 1898, vibrated from the dizzying peal of what sounded like 1,000 throbbing pipes. The audience erupted into spontaneous applause as the brass cascade bounced off the stained-glass windows and bejeweled Louis C. Tiffany Studios interior. "You have to use that trumpet sparingly," Harp said in a musical understatement at the conclusion of his bravura performance yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
June 13, 1991
M. E. Kansler dies; played piano for silent moviesA Mass of Christian burial for Mary Ellen Kansler, a 100-year-old native Baltimorean who played the piano for silent movies, will be offered at 10 a.m. today at St. Thomas More Roman Catholic Church, 6806 McClean Blvd.Mrs. Kansler, who lived on Rosalie Avenue, died Sunday at St. Joseph Hospital of complications of diabetes.She was an Orioles fan, who ignored a congratulatory message from the president at her 100th birthday party last Jan. 1 in favor of an autographed picture of former Orioles pitcher Jim Palmer, the best player Mrs. Kansler said she had seen since Babe Ruth.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2002
Marguerite A. Mergehenn, a music teacher, vocalist and pianist, died in her sleep Tuesday at the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. She was 97. She played musical accompaniment for silent movies during the 1920s, sang on WBAL-Radio in the 1930s and, at the end of her life, performed with the Charles Tones Band at Charlestown. Mrs. Mergehenn taught piano and voice for 50 years, beginning in 1946 in a studio in her Hunting Ridge home, and later in Catonsville, where she moved in 1955.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2001
Tucked away in Federal Hill - and in the minds of many an old-timer - is a shell of a grand movie theater built in 1917 during the heyday of silent movies when tickets cost 10 cents. The cavernous McHenry Theatre quickly became the center of the neighborhood social scene and was the last of the area's golden-era movie houses when it closed in 1971. After being dark for three decades, the McHenry Theatre is making a comeback with one last picture show, for one night only. The theater - which opened May 26, 1917, with The Undying Flame starring Olga Petrova - will be converted into technology offices by early next year.
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