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By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
A bearded Sikh immigrant has won the right to an all-American job at Domino's Pizza.Prabhjot S. Kohli, 53, of Catonsville, suffered religious discrimination when a local Domino's franchisee refused to hire him in 1987 as a manager in training because Mr. Kohli wouldn't shave his beard, an administrative law judge has ruled.Judge Merry C. Hudson ordered LOOC Inc., the Timonium-based franchisee, to offer Mr. Kohli the next available manager-trainee position and give him nearly $6,000 in back pay. She also told the company to revise its "no-beard" policy to accommodate people whose religious beliefs prohibit shaving if they're willing to wear a beard net, as Mr. Kohli was."
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
A 31-year-old Severna Park man who said he is following directions from God to visit sites of tragedies in the United States was recently detained and interviewed by authorities after ammunition was found in his car outside the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin, where a gunman killed six worshippers and himself in August, police reported. According to an Oak Creek, Wis., police report, Joel Sinclair Corbett walked into the temple about 8:41 a.m. on Oct. 28 wearing a backpack with wires hanging out of it. Police in a nearby parking lot spotted him and drove to the temple.
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NEWS
September 25, 1991
The U.S. Postal Service reinstated a practicing Sikh yesterday in Montgomery County, a day after he said he was fired for wearing a turban required by his faith.Postal authorities said they were wrong to dismiss Arvinder Singh, 33, who said he had worn the turban since starting work at the Aspen Hill office in March.Mr. Singh said no one mentioned the turban during his interview, training or 90-day probation period. But this month, Postmaster Judy Walker told him in a letter that turbans are not approved headgear.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Fakhar Durrani, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2012
Leaders of minority religious communities were requesting additional police protection as they prepared for weekend services after the fatal shooting of worshipers at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin last Sunday. Rehan Khan, president of the Masjid Al-Falaah mosque in Abingdon, said he has requested additional protection from the Harford County sheriff's office for the rest of Ramadan, which runs through mid-August, after members of the mosque expressed fears that they could be targeted.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | March 4, 1995
A Catonsville Sikh praised the American justice system yesterday upon learning he had won an appeal in his battle alleging religious discrimination by Domino's Pizza, which refused to hire him seven years ago because of his beard."
NEWS
By ANJU KAUR and ANJU KAUR,Capital News Service | September 5, 2007
An incident involving a turban pat-down at BWI Marshall Airport has sparked a growing concern in Maryland's Sikh American community, among the largest in the country, about eroding its civil liberties in the name of security. When a screener at BWI wanted to pat down Prabhjit Singh's turban a couple of months after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, he had a copy of the federal guidelines handy that said it was not necessary unless his turban set off the metal detector. The guidelines did not help Singh, 27, on Aug. 16 when screeners insisted on patting down his turban, even though he passed through security without beeping.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 17, 2005
VANCOUVER, British Columbia - Twenty years after a bomb on an airliner from Toronto to New Delhi blew up off the Irish coast, killing 329 people, a judge has acquitted the two Indian-born Canadian Sikhs charged in the explosion. After 19 months of testimony, the worst case of mass murder in Canadian history and the bloodiest attack on civilian air aviation before Sept. 11, 2001, remains an unsettled mystery. Yesterday's decision by a British Columbia Supreme Court judge that the government had not made a conclusive case after two decades of investigations costing more than $80 million represented a stinging rebuke to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Canada's federal intelligence agency.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
A bearded Sikh immigrant has won the right to an all-American job at Domino's Pizza.Prabhjot S. Kohli, 53, of Catonsville suffered religious discrimination when a local Domino's franchisee refused to hire him in 1987 as a manager in training because Mr. Kohli wouldn't shave his beard, an administrative law judge has ruled.Judge Merry C. Hudson ordered LOOC Inc., the Timonium-based franchisee, to offer Mr. Kohli the next available manager-trainee position and give him nearly $6,000 in back pay. She also told the company to revise its "no-beard" policy to accommodate people whose religious beliefs prohibit shaving if they're willing to wear a beard net, as Mr. Kohli was."
NEWS
December 26, 1994
Zail Singh, 78, the first Indian president from the minority Sikh community, died yesterday, nearly a month after he was injured in an automobile accident. Mr. Singh, who was president from 1982 to 1987, suffered injuries when his car hit a truck. The exact cause of death was not announced. Mr. Singh was president during the height of the 10-year Sikh rebellion for independence in the northern state of Punjab. The militants said Sikhs were discriminated against by majority Hindus. Born May 5, 1916, Mr. Singh trained to become a Sikh priest.
NEWS
April 9, 1992
Needy receive grant to provide health clinicThe Middendorf Foundation of Baltimore announced a $250,000 grant this week to open a health clinic for needy people in southwest Baltimore.The project, known as Open Gates Inc., is an outgrowth of Paul's Place, which operates a large community kitchen and provides free clothing and legal services from headquarters at the Episcopal Church of St. Paul the Apostle on Washington Boulevard.The Rev. Philip B. Roulette, who is on the boards of both those ministries and serves as outreach adviser to the foundation, says the clinic would open by the end of this year.
NEWS
By Faheem Younus | August 6, 2012
Sunday's mass shooting at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin carried a depressing familiarity. Every few weeks in America, people somewhere are shot en masse, a gunman is captured or killed, and the debate over gun control flourishes on opinion pages. But this shooting was different. It posed a question to the core American values: do we stand up for the safety of our religious minorities with the same vigor as we do for the mainstream population? The question was valiantly answered by the heroic act of the two police officers who did not hesitate to risk their own lives in order to save the lives of others - in this case Sikhs, who are often mistaken for Muslims.
NEWS
By Dawinder S. Sidhu | August 6, 2012
We do not yet know for certain what motivated a gunman to open fire on a Sikh temple in Wisconsin Sunday, killing six and wounding many others. But we do know that the Sikh community in America - for no reason other than its members' appearance - has suffered extensive harassment, prejudice and violence in the years since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Sunday's shooting was a tragedy, but it offers Americans an opportunity to learn about the Sikh community and to quell the ignorance that may have enabled the shooting to occur in the first place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Label 56, the Baltimore-based record label that released music by End Apathy - the band fronted by alleged Sikh temple shooter Wade Michael Page - released a statement Monday afternoon, regarding Page's relationship with the label. It reads: Label 56 is very sorry to hear about the tragedy in Wisconsin and our thoughts are with the families and friends of those who are affected. We have worked hard over the years to promote a positive image and have posted many articles encouraging people to take a positive path in life, to abstain from drugs, alcohol, and just general behavior that can affect ones life negatively.
NEWS
By Dawinder “Dave” S. Sidhu | November 3, 2010
Following the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Sikhs in the United States have been murdered, stabbed, harassed, removed from airplanes, fired from jobs, and refused service in public establishments, among other things. This mistreatment is based on their appearance and is because Americans generally are unaware of Sikhs or Sikh identity. Sikhs are members of a progressive, monotheistic religion founded in 15th century South Asia. Male Sikhs, who are required to cover their heads and refrain from cutting their hair, traditionally wear turbans and have beards.
NEWS
By ANJU KAUR and ANJU KAUR,Capital News Service | September 5, 2007
An incident involving a turban pat-down at BWI Marshall Airport has sparked a growing concern in Maryland's Sikh American community, among the largest in the country, about eroding its civil liberties in the name of security. When a screener at BWI wanted to pat down Prabhjit Singh's turban a couple of months after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, he had a copy of the federal guidelines handy that said it was not necessary unless his turban set off the metal detector. The guidelines did not help Singh, 27, on Aug. 16 when screeners insisted on patting down his turban, even though he passed through security without beeping.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | April 2, 2007
There is a certain calm before the rumble of the train, before the passengers descend, before they file into taxi after taxi. It is during those precious moments that the line of taxi drivers outside of Penn Station on St. Paul Street stretches into a long, thin No. 2 pencil - 12, 13, even 15 taxis long. The men from Ethiopia and Eritrea, India and Pakistan, Nigeria and Russia, gather here. Some are from rival countries, but here there are no barriers, just the shared experience of a profession with no glory.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | April 2, 2007
There is a certain calm before the rumble of the train, before the passengers descend, before they file into taxi after taxi. It is during those precious moments that the line of taxi drivers outside of Penn Station on St. Paul Street stretches into a long, thin No. 2 pencil - 12, 13, even 15 taxis long. The men from Ethiopia and Eritrea, India and Pakistan, Nigeria and Russia, gather here. Some are from rival countries, but here there are no barriers, just the shared experience of a profession with no glory.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | April 13, 1992
With lilting music, prayers of thanks and a communal vegetarian feast, Baltimore-area Sikhs celebrated the opening of their first local temple in Randallstown yesterday.Five sword-bearing Sikhs, garbed in traditional white costume, stood by as the temple's flag was hoisted yesterday morning. A rainbow of flower petals showered down upon the congregation when the orange and blue pennant reached the top of the pole.The festivities followed a marathon 48-hour worship service, in which the Sikhs' 1,420-page holy book, the Guru Granth Sahib, was read cover to cover by congregants taking turns.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 17, 2005
VANCOUVER, British Columbia - Twenty years after a bomb on an airliner from Toronto to New Delhi blew up off the Irish coast, killing 329 people, a judge has acquitted the two Indian-born Canadian Sikhs charged in the explosion. After 19 months of testimony, the worst case of mass murder in Canadian history and the bloodiest attack on civilian air aviation before Sept. 11, 2001, remains an unsettled mystery. Yesterday's decision by a British Columbia Supreme Court judge that the government had not made a conclusive case after two decades of investigations costing more than $80 million represented a stinging rebuke to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Canada's federal intelligence agency.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 2004
NEW DELHI, India - Manmohan Singh was sworn in as India's 13th prime minister yesterday, making history as the country's first Sikh to hold the position. Another kind of history was made as well: For the first time, the Indian National Congress, which led India on its own for 37 of the country's first 45 years, will lead a coalition government. Singh, an economist and former finance minister, will be the country's first prime minister to hold a doctorate. He is credited with saving India from a balance-of-payments crisis and potential economic collapse in 1991, and with beginning many of the economic changes that have helped transform India's quasi-socialist economy into a growing global force.
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