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By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,Orlando Sentinel | January 5, 2007
Repeat after me: "There's no such thing as a good children's movie that opens in January." There isn't. If it were great, they would roll it out at Christmas. If it were passably entertaining, they would hold it for March, that magical Ice Age window. Happily N'ever After (Lionsgate) Starring the voices of Freddie Prinze Jr., Sarah Michelle Gellar, Sigourney Weaver, Wallace Shawn, Andy Dick. Directed by Paul J. Bolger. Rated PG. Time 85 minutes.
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NEWS
May 12, 2009
DVD Galaxy Quest: Deluxe Edition *** 1/2 (3 1/2 stars) Starring Tim Allen, Sigourney Weaver, Alan Rickman. Directed by Dean Parisot. Released by Dreamworks Video. $14.95. With a renewed and reinvigorated Star Trek blasting off of movie screens everywhere, what better time to revisit the gentle but hilarious Trek parody, 1999's Galaxy Quest? Apparently, Dreamworks thought the same, taking the opportunity to release this deluxe edition. To adapt a catchphrase from Dr. Lazarus (Alan Rickman)
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FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 9, 2005
Imaginary Heroes is a tale of two brothers. One is an Olympics-ready swimming champ, a blond Adonis, a kid his father has built his life around. The younger brother is a confused, depressed loner, unsure about his sexuality, his place in the world, even his place in his family. That's because the older brother, the athlete with everything going for him, has killed himself. Everybody in this family, the creation of writer-director Dan Harris, is in a different form of mourning. Tim (Emile Hirsch)
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | January 27, 2009
Idon't often write about second showings of made-for-TV movies, but Lifetime is airing Prayers for Bobby, which premiered Saturday, again tonight, and it is worth going out of your way to see. From a sure-to-win-an-Emmy performance by Sigourney Weaver, to a screenplay that explores gay identity as sensitively as it has been done on cable TV, this docudrama deserves a network-size audience. The Bobby is Bobby Griffith, who attended high school in California in the 1970s. The film is set in 1979 as he comes to terms with being gay. Ryan Kelley is not a great actor, but he shares most scenes with Weaver, and she elevates everyone's game.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | January 27, 2009
Idon't often write about second showings of made-for-TV movies, but Lifetime is airing Prayers for Bobby, which premiered Saturday, again tonight, and it is worth going out of your way to see. From a sure-to-win-an-Emmy performance by Sigourney Weaver, to a screenplay that explores gay identity as sensitively as it has been done on cable TV, this docudrama deserves a network-size audience. The Bobby is Bobby Griffith, who attended high school in California in the 1970s. The film is set in 1979 as he comes to terms with being gay. Ryan Kelley is not a great actor, but he shares most scenes with Weaver, and she elevates everyone's game.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 18, 2003
Holes, based on a beloved, award-winning children's book, is so faithful to its source that legions of schoolkids and their teachers will clasp it to their hearts. After all, it's a glorified set of illustrations that will extend, or at least not get in the way of, their original reading experience. Those who come to the movie cold will find it an exasperating assembly of brutal pedantry and whimsies, boasting far less charm or grace than even the first Harry Potter picture. It's partly a broad satire on teen boot camps: The hero, Stanley Yelnats (Shia LaBeouf)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 26, 2002
Set entirely during a Thanksgiving weekend in New York, clocking in at a mere 78 minutes, Tadpole proves that brevity is still the soul of wit. But when it comes to the success of worldly comic movies, unpretentious wisdom, ironic control and a crackerjack ensemble also have a lot to do with it. The tale of a prep-school boy infatuated - or maybe in real love - with his stepmother has nearly perfect pitch. Oscar Grubman is an original creation: The opposite of Holden Caulfield, he wants to jump headlong into the rye; the opposite of Benjamin Braddock, he can't wait to seduce an older woman and graduate into the seriousness of adulthood.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 12, 2002
The Toronto International Film Festival commemorated Sept. 11 yesterday in the best way it knew how: through cinema. The Guys, about a fire captain (Anthony LaPaglia) who works with an editor (Sigourney Weaver) to write eulogies for his men who died that day, screened after a popular run as an off-Broadway play. The critical consensus was that Jim Simpson's small-budget film, adapted from his staging at New York's Flea Theater, lacked emotional heft, but that LaPaglia turned in an authentic performance.
NEWS
May 12, 2009
DVD Galaxy Quest: Deluxe Edition *** 1/2 (3 1/2 stars) Starring Tim Allen, Sigourney Weaver, Alan Rickman. Directed by Dean Parisot. Released by Dreamworks Video. $14.95. With a renewed and reinvigorated Star Trek blasting off of movie screens everywhere, what better time to revisit the gentle but hilarious Trek parody, 1999's Galaxy Quest? Apparently, Dreamworks thought the same, taking the opportunity to release this deluxe edition. To adapt a catchphrase from Dr. Lazarus (Alan Rickman)
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | September 18, 1992
Los Angeles. -- Among the great curses, they say, are living in interesting times and seeing yourself as others see you. I did both the other day when I was with the president and first lady, wandering through the White House and chatting on the Truman Balcony overlooking the long greensward of the Mall down to the reflecting ponds toward the Lincoln Memorial.''This must be like slumming for you,'' said the first lady. In person and relaxed, Ellen Mitchell looks a lot like Sigourney Weaver.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,Orlando Sentinel | January 5, 2007
Repeat after me: "There's no such thing as a good children's movie that opens in January." There isn't. If it were great, they would roll it out at Christmas. If it were passably entertaining, they would hold it for March, that magical Ice Age window. Happily N'ever After (Lionsgate) Starring the voices of Freddie Prinze Jr., Sarah Michelle Gellar, Sigourney Weaver, Wallace Shawn, Andy Dick. Directed by Paul J. Bolger. Rated PG. Time 85 minutes.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 9, 2005
Imaginary Heroes is a tale of two brothers. One is an Olympics-ready swimming champ, a blond Adonis, a kid his father has built his life around. The younger brother is a confused, depressed loner, unsure about his sexuality, his place in the world, even his place in his family. That's because the older brother, the athlete with everything going for him, has killed himself. Everybody in this family, the creation of writer-director Dan Harris, is in a different form of mourning. Tim (Emile Hirsch)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 18, 2003
Holes, based on a beloved, award-winning children's book, is so faithful to its source that legions of schoolkids and their teachers will clasp it to their hearts. After all, it's a glorified set of illustrations that will extend, or at least not get in the way of, their original reading experience. Those who come to the movie cold will find it an exasperating assembly of brutal pedantry and whimsies, boasting far less charm or grace than even the first Harry Potter picture. It's partly a broad satire on teen boot camps: The hero, Stanley Yelnats (Shia LaBeouf)
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 12, 2002
The Toronto International Film Festival commemorated Sept. 11 yesterday in the best way it knew how: through cinema. The Guys, about a fire captain (Anthony LaPaglia) who works with an editor (Sigourney Weaver) to write eulogies for his men who died that day, screened after a popular run as an off-Broadway play. The critical consensus was that Jim Simpson's small-budget film, adapted from his staging at New York's Flea Theater, lacked emotional heft, but that LaPaglia turned in an authentic performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and By Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | September 8, 2002
Tadpole, now in its seventh week at area movie theaters, is a charming, unpretentious comedy about love, longing and statutory rape. The film is set in New York over a particularly turbulent Thanksgiving weekend, during which 15-year-old Oscar Grubman (Aaron Stanford) puckers up with his stepmother, Eve (Sigourney Weaver) and has a one-night stand with Eve's best friend, Diane (Bebe Neuwirth.) I saw it a few weeks ago, and I've been fuming ever since. It's not so much the subject matter that's troubling -- kids have been getting crushes on adults since time immemorial -- it's that the filmmakers don't seem to realize that there's anything wrong when adults return the affection, and it gets physical.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 26, 2002
Set entirely during a Thanksgiving weekend in New York, clocking in at a mere 78 minutes, Tadpole proves that brevity is still the soul of wit. But when it comes to the success of worldly comic movies, unpretentious wisdom, ironic control and a crackerjack ensemble also have a lot to do with it. The tale of a prep-school boy infatuated - or maybe in real love - with his stepmother has nearly perfect pitch. Oscar Grubman is an original creation: The opposite of Holden Caulfield, he wants to jump headlong into the rye; the opposite of Benjamin Braddock, he can't wait to seduce an older woman and graduate into the seriousness of adulthood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 27, 1995
Highly theatricalized forms like one-, two- or three-character plays almost never work on the screen because they can't break away from their theatricality. They feel phony all the way through. But Roman Polanski manages the nearly impossible: He makes Ariel Dorfman's "Death and the Maiden" feel like an authentic, spontaneous experience.A simple, powerful premise: In a country that has to be Dorfman's native Chile, in the glow of restored democracy, a woman who was a torture victim by incredible coincidence comes face-to-face with the man she believes tortured her. She pulls a gun and captures him, to her liberal husband's horror: Then she sets out to do to him what he did to her -- get a confession at any cost.
FEATURES
By Janet Maslin and Janet Maslin,New York Times | October 26, 1992
Hollywood has lately revived its interest in historical pageantry, and the insurance policy is the longhaired leading man. What better way to attract the dating crowd to, say, the French and Indian War than to provide the sight of Daniel Day-Lewis in form-fitting buckskin?What better way to send Columbus to the New World with a smile on his face than to give him a coy, beautiful Queen Isabella (Sigourney Weaver) to authorize his mission -- and to turn Columbus into Gerard Depardieu, an actor who clearly appreciates feminine attention wherever he finds it?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 27, 1995
Highly theatricalized forms like one-, two- or three-character plays almost never work on the screen because they can't break away from their theatricality. They feel phony all the way through. But Roman Polanski manages the nearly impossible: He makes Ariel Dorfman's "Death and the Maiden" feel like an authentic, spontaneous experience.A simple, powerful premise: In a country that has to be Dorfman's native Chile, in the glow of restored democracy, a woman who was a torture victim by incredible coincidence comes face-to-face with the man she believes tortured her. She pulls a gun and captures him, to her liberal husband's horror: Then she sets out to do to him what he did to her -- get a confession at any cost.
FEATURES
By Janet Maslin and Janet Maslin,New York Times | October 26, 1992
Hollywood has lately revived its interest in historical pageantry, and the insurance policy is the longhaired leading man. What better way to attract the dating crowd to, say, the French and Indian War than to provide the sight of Daniel Day-Lewis in form-fitting buckskin?What better way to send Columbus to the New World with a smile on his face than to give him a coy, beautiful Queen Isabella (Sigourney Weaver) to authorize his mission -- and to turn Columbus into Gerard Depardieu, an actor who clearly appreciates feminine attention wherever he finds it?
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