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NEWS
January 30, 2014
Congratulations to Baltimore County Council members David Marks and Vicki Almond, who have introduced a bill to ban certain electronic signs along portions of Charles Street in Towson ( "Bill would ban electronic changeable signage in areas of Towson," Jan. 24). They understand the value of aesthetics. A charming road without harassing signs attracts tourists and home buyers and creates good communities, all of which give back multifold value. Ellen H. Kelly, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | March 13, 2014
Construction on the Towson "Bike Beltway", which uses a set of bike lanes and signage to demarcate the 4.2 miles of roads around downtown Towson, will begin this year and should be completed by June, according to a county public works official. Stephen Weber, chief of Baltimore County's Division of Traffic Engineering said Tuesday after a meeting of the Baltimore County Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee that the contract for the work was signed last month. The Maryland Bikeways Program gave Baltimore County a $100,000 grant - with a commitment by the county to match 20 percent of that - in July 2012.
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BUSINESS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
The Ravens might be set at quarterback, but Johnny Manziel is coming to Baltimore. Sort of. The 2012 Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback, who is entering the 2014 NFL Draft after two high-profile seasons with Texas A&M, is the subject of new signage at Under Armour's Locust Point campus. Signs in at least two locations at Under Armour's headquarters welcomed Manziel to "the team," though its not clear which team that is, exactly. Requests for comment from Under Armour were not immediately returned Monday evening.
SPORTS
February 28, 2014
Baltimore Sun reporters Don Markus, Jeff Barker and producer-editor Jonas Shaffer weigh in on three topics from the past week in Maryland sports. Who's to blame for Maryland not winning close games, Mark Turgeon or his players? Don Markus:  After losing to No. 4 Syracuse on Monday night at Comcast Center, the Terps are now 3-5 overall this season in games decided by six points or less, including 1-3 in the ACC. That includes non-conference wins over Florida Atlantic (66-62)
NEWS
February 20, 2011
Who among us has not been lost in Columbia? The planned Howard County community has much to offer — if only we could find it. There is commerce there, but it is tucked away in well-camouflaged pockets. These can be discovered by the cognoscenti, but for the uninitiated is a struggle. Signage — the traditional method of giving the populace a clue as to where the dentist's office, the pet store or the shopping center is located — is minimal. Since Columbia's birth in 1967, its rulers, guarding against garish commercialism, have prescribed signs that favor tasteful discretion over utilitarian illumination.
NEWS
January 31, 2011
If the city of Baltimore spends any time appealing the ruling by a judge regarding signage at pregnancy centers ( "Judge rules pregnancy center ordinance unconstitutional," Jan. 29), it would be an inexcusable waste of city attorneys' time, and time is money. The city needs to be careful with its resources. Would the city require shoe repair shops to post signage that they don't sell new shoes or Chinese restaurants to post signage saying they don't sell Mexican food? A young woman who wants an abortion can easily find out where to get one. If a pregnancy center offers alternatives to abortion and offers clothing, prenatal classes and adoption counseling, that activity doesn't prevent a woman from going elsewhere to get an abortion.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | June 14, 1993
Here goes one of my pet peeves about nonprofit organizations. Signs. Plain, simple signs. Or, as the public relations types refer to them, signage.Why is it that nonprofits are so far behind the rest of corporate America regarding signage? This past week, I played the 147th rendition of the "I Dare You To Find Me" game. In this game, the rules are known only by the nonprofit agency, whose employees are sworn to secrecy. The game goes like this.Say you want to meet with an executive of a nonprofit organization, as I did recently.
NEWS
August 18, 1993
The late Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart said about obscenity that he couldn't define it, but he knew it when it saw it. He could as easily have been discussing ugly business signs.Baltimore County has been in a mini-tempest this summer over the little real estate signs that pop up on public rights of way every weekend (even though the much greater problem in that county is the runaway signs that mar Pulaski Highway and other major commercial arteries). The City Council in aesthetically-aware Annapolis just banned neon signs in the Historic District.
NEWS
May 3, 1996
IT'S SPRING AND the fertile earth is abloom with -- billboards? That's the view of South Carroll residents and businesses that want the profusion of advertising signage nipped in the bud. Too many big, attention-grabbing signs result in visual pollution and traffic safety hazards.Carroll County planners proposed a ban on new billboards, but the planning commission wants to review the entire issue, including existing billboards. There's a suggestion for new rules to be adopted in the master plan for land use, soon to be overhauled after 32 years.
NEWS
March 5, 1993
How can a business be isolated when tens of thousands of cars pass it every day? Just ask the merchants along U.S. 50/301 near Cape St. Claire, who complain that prospective customers have had trouble finding them ever since the state reconfigured the highway two years ago.The landscape a couple miles west of the Bay Bridge has changed dramatically for the handful of fast food restaurants and sporting goods retailers who line the highway there. When those businesses were established, they were near the last traffic signal on Maryland's western shore on the route toward the Atlantic resorts.
NEWS
January 30, 2014
Congratulations to Baltimore County Council members David Marks and Vicki Almond, who have introduced a bill to ban certain electronic signs along portions of Charles Street in Towson ( "Bill would ban electronic changeable signage in areas of Towson," Jan. 24). They understand the value of aesthetics. A charming road without harassing signs attracts tourists and home buyers and creates good communities, all of which give back multifold value. Ellen H. Kelly, Baltimore - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
BUSINESS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
The Ravens might be set at quarterback, but Johnny Manziel is coming to Baltimore. Sort of. The 2012 Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback, who is entering the 2014 NFL Draft after two high-profile seasons with Texas A&M, is the subject of new signage at Under Armour's Locust Point campus. Signs in at least two locations at Under Armour's headquarters welcomed Manziel to "the team," though its not clear which team that is, exactly. Requests for comment from Under Armour were not immediately returned Monday evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Baltimore's Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, shuttered since September 2012, will open on weekends in October, offering a "sneak peak" at what visitors will experience when it reopens for good next spring. "There aren't any major changes," said Kristen Harbeson, president of the board of directors of Poe Baltimore, the nonprofit that will be taking over day-to-day management of the West Baltimore historic site from the city. Inside the house, "it's been refreshed; it's been updated," she said.
NEWS
February 20, 2011
Who among us has not been lost in Columbia? The planned Howard County community has much to offer — if only we could find it. There is commerce there, but it is tucked away in well-camouflaged pockets. These can be discovered by the cognoscenti, but for the uninitiated is a struggle. Signage — the traditional method of giving the populace a clue as to where the dentist's office, the pet store or the shopping center is located — is minimal. Since Columbia's birth in 1967, its rulers, guarding against garish commercialism, have prescribed signs that favor tasteful discretion over utilitarian illumination.
NEWS
January 31, 2011
If the city of Baltimore spends any time appealing the ruling by a judge regarding signage at pregnancy centers ( "Judge rules pregnancy center ordinance unconstitutional," Jan. 29), it would be an inexcusable waste of city attorneys' time, and time is money. The city needs to be careful with its resources. Would the city require shoe repair shops to post signage that they don't sell new shoes or Chinese restaurants to post signage saying they don't sell Mexican food? A young woman who wants an abortion can easily find out where to get one. If a pregnancy center offers alternatives to abortion and offers clothing, prenatal classes and adoption counseling, that activity doesn't prevent a woman from going elsewhere to get an abortion.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | November 4, 2007
I like to read retail signage. More accurately, I like to find mistakes in retail signage. This makes me one of those annoying people who hold up the line at a fast-food place because they feel compelled to let the cashier know that there really should be no apostrophe in the headline: "Try our spicy Southwestern nugget's." Does it seem a bit cruel, my joy in pointing out the grammatical blunders of others? Yes, but once I held a job writing fast-food tray liners, and I like to think I brought to that lowly position the same respect and reverence for language that I share with you weekly in this column.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
Baltimore's Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, shuttered since September 2012, will open on weekends in October, offering a "sneak peak" at what visitors will experience when it reopens for good next spring. "There aren't any major changes," said Kristen Harbeson, president of the board of directors of Poe Baltimore, the nonprofit that will be taking over day-to-day management of the West Baltimore historic site from the city. Inside the house, "it's been refreshed; it's been updated," she said.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | March 13, 2014
Construction on the Towson "Bike Beltway", which uses a set of bike lanes and signage to demarcate the 4.2 miles of roads around downtown Towson, will begin this year and should be completed by June, according to a county public works official. Stephen Weber, chief of Baltimore County's Division of Traffic Engineering said Tuesday after a meeting of the Baltimore County Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee that the contract for the work was signed last month. The Maryland Bikeways Program gave Baltimore County a $100,000 grant - with a commitment by the county to match 20 percent of that - in July 2012.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2004
Expect to see Spider-Man hanging around the entrance gates and the JumboTron at Camden Yards during the weekend of June 11-13, but don't look for him in the on-deck circles. T.J. Brightman, the Orioles' vice president of corporate sales and sponsorships, said yesterday that the team won't put the logo from the movie Spider-Man 2 on the on-deck circles, and won't use the ad-adorned home plate or rubber for the ceremonial first pitch. "It is a Major League Baseball initiative, and we are participating at baseball's request," Brightman said.
BUSINESS
By Marissa Lowman and Marissa Lowman,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
Two awesomely large, brightly lit M&T Bank signs are being erected on the north and south ends of the Ravens' stadium this week, a huge warning of the marketing blitz that awaits fans inside. The interior of the stadium is dotted with about 200 high-tech signs that can work in unison or change in an instant to advertise dozens of companies or a single firm again and again. Just where the signs are located, what they advertise, how they are packaged and when they are activated are all part of a carefully calculated marketing matrix designed to maximize the impact of the millions spent by advertisers.
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