Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSign Language
IN THE NEWS

Sign Language

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Christopher Neely, Capital News Service | October 30, 2013
The judge in the ongoing trial of a the man accused of sexually abusing female students at the Maryland School for the Deaf implemented an uncommon rule in the courtroom Tuesday. After the jury was finalized and prior to opening statements, Judge William V. Tucker of the Circuit Court for Howard County forbade any sign language communication by people in the courtroom, either between spectators or between spectators and trial participants. The only exception was for the four official courtroom interpreters and those communicating to the interpreters.  Speaking to members of the audience, he also said "facial gestures to any witnesses or participants" were forbidden during the trial, threatening to remove anyone who violated the temporary rule.  The rule was initiated due to the number of key players in the case against Clarence Cepheus Taylor III who are deaf, including the defendant, victims and some witnesses.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
What we have in "Tribes," the agitated and absorbing play by Nina Raine receiving its Baltimore premiere at Everyman Theatre, isn't a failure to communicate. It's a stubborn, even proud, refusal to communicate. While four members of a well-educated London family speak over and through one another, wounding and goading as they go, the fifth does what he can to keep up, to fit in, or just stay out of the way. He's Billy, the youngest child, born deaf into a hearing family - not a listening family, mind you, just a hearing one. Billy's parents reason that their son is better off not being defined by his deafness, not being assimilated into the deaf community, which would only make him feel more handicapped.
Advertisement
NEWS
By CHERYL POWELL and CHERYL POWELL,AKRON (OHIO) BEACON JOURNA | November 20, 2005
LOOKING FOR A SIGN ABOUT WHAT YOUR FUSSING, WHINING BABY REALLY WANTS? A growing number of parents are turning to sign language to help little ones communicate their wants and needs before they're able to talk. There are books, community courses and even references to infant sign language in popular motion pictures. The ultimate goal of using baby sign language is increasing bonding and reducing frustration among infants and toddlers, said Linda Acredolo, co-author of the book Baby Signs and professor emeritus of psychology at the University of California-Davis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Many a play deals with language and communication. There is always theatrical ore to be mined in the way people express themselves - or fail to - and how that can complicate so many things in life. British playwright Nina Raine gives the subject an unusual spin in "Tribes," a 2010 work about a young deaf man named Billy, born into a hearing family full of people who communicate all too crassly or ineptly with one another. This funny and touching play, which Everyman Theatre is staging for its season-closing production, features an actor deeply familiar with its central issues.
NEWS
By MARI PERRY and MARI PERRY,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 28, 2005
Maryland students may soon have another option for foreign language credit: American Sign Language. The state Board of Education decided Tuesday to further explore allowing schools to offer the class for more than elective credit. But several obstacles stand in the way, including a lack of qualified teachers. There are more than 1,300 students in Maryland schools who are deaf or hard of hearing, but State Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick said she expected a course in sign language would appeal to hearing students, as well as to the hearing impaired.
NEWS
May 23, 2004
Martha Knutson, Upper Chesapeake Health's general counsel, will demonstrate the iCommunicator software, which translates spoken words into American Sign Language and text displayed on a laptop computer screen, when the Harford County Commission on Disabilities meets at 5 p.m. tomorrow at the historic Bel Air Colored High School, 205 Hays St., Bel Air. Although the software is not intended as a substitute for a sign language interpreter, it has the potential...
FEATURES
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | August 17, 1995
Janet L. Bailey, founder and president of Sign Language Associates Inc., a private interpreting firm in Silver Spring, says she was "never destined to be an interpreter for the deaf. I was just looking for a job."But there are indications that Ms. Bailey, whose firm grosses $3 million a year and has 40 full-time staff and more than 200 part-time workers, thoughtfully segued into her role as the third party in communications between the deaf and hearing.Ms. Bailey learned American Sign Language as a child when she went along with her mother, who took an introductory ASL course.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1996
Della Patricia Martinuzzi, a postal worker who learned sign language so that she could communicate with her housemate and others, died Saturday of Hodgkin's disease at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She was 42 and lived in Essex."She signed because she just couldn't stand to see anyone as an outsider," said Betty L. Oglesby, a friend and colleague at the downtown post office. "She couldn't stand to see anyone ever cut off from others."Ms. Martinuzzi, a Dundalk native, had some knowledge ofsigning when she learned the finger spell method of sign language in 1970, in which every word is spelled out. She was proficient within two years.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 1996
WHEN FRED AND BECKY HARTMAN moved to River Hill last spring, they naturally wanted to get acquainted with their new neighbors.There was one complication -- the Hartmans are deaf. But Fred, who teaches sign language part time at Catonsville Community College, found a solution. This summer the Hartmans have volunteered to teach American Sign Language to adults and children at The Meeting Room in River Hill, in space donated by Village manager Sunny McGuinn."I know many people are awkward in communicating with deaf people," said Fred.
NEWS
By Vicki Wellford | February 13, 1991
First-graders at Odenton Elementary School are finding that reading is fun and are learning at a more rapid pace thanks to the innovations of first-grade teacher Doris Manzo and reading teacher Lee Laque.Teachers are always looking for ways to help students who have difficulty remembering sight vocabulary. Research done at the University of Maryland indicates that the use of signing by teachers can help students retain sight vocabulary.Robert M. Wilson conducted the study with 10 first-grade teachers.
NEWS
By Caroline Solomon and Jeffrey Archer Miller | April 25, 2014
In the midst of the misery of Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the media fell in love with then-New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's sign language interpreter, Lydia Callis, who captivated audiences with her expressive renderings of Mr. Bloomberg's humdrum press conferences. "A bright light during dark days: Bloomberg's sign language star," swooned National Public Radio. New York Magazine praised her as "a legitimate reason to smile" in difficult times. And Saturday Night Live, in a sign she had truly arrived, impersonated her during an opening skit.
NEWS
By Christopher Neely, Capital News Service | October 30, 2013
The judge in the ongoing trial of a the man accused of sexually abusing female students at the Maryland School for the Deaf implemented an uncommon rule in the courtroom Tuesday. After the jury was finalized and prior to opening statements, Judge William V. Tucker of the Circuit Court for Howard County forbade any sign language communication by people in the courtroom, either between spectators or between spectators and trial participants. The only exception was for the four official courtroom interpreters and those communicating to the interpreters.  Speaking to members of the audience, he also said "facial gestures to any witnesses or participants" were forbidden during the trial, threatening to remove anyone who violated the temporary rule.  The rule was initiated due to the number of key players in the case against Clarence Cepheus Taylor III who are deaf, including the defendant, victims and some witnesses.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
The Seton Keough field hockey team is having a year to remember in the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland B Conference, and one of the primary reasons is the play of goalkeeper Becca Wallace. The senior, who transferred to the school two years ago from North County, has made 76 saves this season and shut out the entire B Conference. She has allowed only five goals out of conference to top-ranked public schools and A Conference teams as the Gators have built a 16-3-2 overall record, including 11-0 in conference.
EXPLORE
By David Tayman, D.V.M | February 7, 2012
Q: Is it possible to teach dogs to communicate in sign language -- not just understanding signals we give but using signs themselves to communicate with us? A: This interesting question was prompted by an entry posted several months ago on the Columbia Dog Talk blog (www.columbiadogtalk.blogspot.com) about a 2009 book called “Dogs Can Sign, Too: A Breakthrough Method for Teaching Your Dog to Communicate.” Author Sean Senechal has created a system she says can be used to teach domestic animals to not only respond to sign language but to be able to express themselves using gestures, too. Most dog owners can point to actions their pets do, seemingly intentionally, in order to elicit a desired response from their humans -- ringing a bell at the door to go out, scratching at the pantry where their treats and food are kept, even bringing a leash to their owners as an invitation to go for a walk.
HEALTH
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
A deaf Maryland woman and her mother, who is also deaf, filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday against St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson, alleging that the hospital refused to provide — or pay for — a sign language interpreter when the younger woman experienced a medical emergency in late 2009. "Plaintiffs requested but were denied sign language interpreter services and were thus unable to communicate effectively with Defendant's medical personnel during critical periods," reads the 11-page civil suit filed by Jennifer Simmons of Frederick and Susanna Paulay, who lives in New York.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST | March 26, 2008
Jennifer Curran Manager of deaf services The League for People with Disabilities, Baltimore Salary --$37,000 Age --34 Years on the job --18 months How she got started --Curran went to college as an education major, hoping to concentrate in special education. However, she decided teaching children wasn't exactly what she wanted. Taking a break from college, Curran worked in customer service at a women's clothing company. She went back to school and graduated from Towson University with a degree in deaf studies.
NEWS
By William Rasmussen and William Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2003
Kathy MacMillan hooked the index finger of her right hand around her left thumb. The index finger of her left hand wiggled freely, as if it was trying to escape. In the shade of a few oak trees in a Sykesville park, she explained to 30 children how Goldilocks escaped from the three bears' house - in sign language. The kids quickly got the hang of forming the sign for "running," but the moms in the back were having a bit more trouble. "It's hard," Susan Stephey said to a fellow mother, who was also struggling with the maneuver.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1994
Sign language is a daily part of life at Shipley's Choice Elementary School.Each day, hearing students are taught how to translate a piece of a sentence. By the end of the week, they can sign the entire sentence.The morning sign language exercises, broadcast over closed-circuit television to all classrooms, is one reason why the Millersville school is one of eight Maryland Blue Ribbon Schools of Excellence.The recognition program, run by the Maryland State Department of Education, honors schools that excel in such areas as leadership, teaching and student environment, curriculum, parent involvement and student performance on assessment exams.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to the Sun | January 27, 2008
In a small classroom at Indian Creek School in Crownsville, students are staring at teacher Allen Markel's hands. Markel, who is showing how to give directions to someone who is deaf, points to an overhead projection of a hallway, then the words "water fountain." He purses his lips and sucks in air as if he were drinking. He moves his fingers in front of his mouth to mimic the flowing water. Then he indicates how a student who might be standing in that hallway would use American Sign Language to direct a hearing-impaired visitor to the water fountain.
NEWS
March 14, 2007
Sign language and dance performance -- Anne Arundel Community College will present Let's Sign and Dance at 7 p.m. Friday in Pascal Center for Performing Arts, 101 College Parkway, Arnold. The Wild Zappers (above), an all-male, hearing-impaired dance company, incorporates American Sign Language into its jazz, funk and hip-hop dancing. General admission is $10 and $8 for AACC students. 410-777-2457.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.