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Sight Words

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FEATURES
April 5, 1998
Today's list of "sight words" can be found in our Story Time selection, "The Selfish Giant.""Sight words" are the words that occur most commonly in all reading materials. While many sight words can be phonetically sounded out, most become readily recognizable through repetition.Young children often learn to associate spoken words with printed forms on signs, cereal boxes or television screens before they learn to read from books.See if your child can find these words in "The Selfish Giant."
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NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2004
Jessica Viens used to get frustrated when she practiced her multiplication tables. The fifth-grader at Elkridge Elementary School would sulk for a minute or so before giving the task a second try. These days, Jessica, 11, is doing remarkably well thanks to the school's Volunteer Reading Program that was launched in the fall. "I'm really proud of myself," she said. The program involves community volunteers meeting with pupils three to five times a week for about 15 minutes to practice reading "sight words" - words that pupils should be able to read without sounding them out. They also help pupils improve reading fluency - the accuracy and speed at which a child reads - and memorize multiplication tables.
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FEATURES
June 21, 1998
Sight Words for "Raising Dragons."Guess the word:babyagainwasdayfromlittleloudmothernighteverywherebelievecropsSight words are words that your child recognizes instantly without analysis. The larger the store of sight words, the more quickly and fluently the child is able to read. Words can be taken from your child's school work, from stories even the grocery store shelves. Keep the words in a box to enjoy and review.Try this activity with words from "Raising Dragons" to build visual discrimination:Print the words on index cards.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2000
Every fall, teachers know that before they start on new material, they'll have to play catch-up - and for students who were below grade level in June, making up for that time lost during the summer is even harder. That's one reason why administrators at Running Brook Elementary School in Columbia started a four-week summer program this year for children who were working below grade level in reading and math. The school has had a summer program for many years, said Principal Marion Miller, but this year, school district officials gave Running Brook more money to focus on reading and math for second-graders moving up to third grade.
FEATURES
January 27, 1999
Children love to listen to stories about family members and events. In the story ``Grandfather's Journey,'' the author's grandfather traveled from Japan to California by steamship. Ask your child, ``How do you think the author made the same journey when he turned old enough to travel?'' Let your child tell about some of the ways he has traveled with his own family.steamshiptrain schoolriverboatsailboattruckjetbusbicyclevanhelicopterWrite the sight words above on 5''-by-7'' index cards. Add any new means of travel your child brought up in the discussion about family journeys.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
After reading "Because You're Lucky," write each of these sight words on a 3-by-5 index card. Place five words at a time in front of your child. Give clues to describe the new word, then ask your child to say the word and use it in a sentence. For example, using the first row of five cards say, "Can you be a good detective and find a new word that means battle?" Your child should pick up the card with the word "fight" and use it in a sentence. As a variation, place four of the sight words in a row in front of your child.
FEATURES
October 11, 1998
Turn sight words - and their consonant blends - into a matching game. Here's how to do it using eight words from "Danny: The Champion of the World."Preparation1. Take a piece of unlined 8-by-11-inch paper, and draw lines dividing it in half. Then draw lines dividing each half into fourths to make 8 grids.2. On each grid, write these consonant blends in any order:bl, br, cl, dr, fr, sl, st, tr.3. On index cards, write these eight sight words from "Danny: The Champion of the World": black, breathes, cloak, dream, friendly, story, sleeping, tree.
NEWS
April 18, 1999
Editor's note: In her biweekly column, Jerdine Nolen today explores spelling and what parents can do to help their children master this challenge.Spelling is the forming of words with letters in an established order. It is a developmental skill, so practice is essential. Seeing correctly spelled words and learning to write the proper sequence of letters in a word can help us improve. It takes a lot of practice in the beginning until this method of representing sounds and letter is mastered.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 2004
Jessica Viens used to get frustrated when she practiced her multiplication tables. The fifth-grader at Elkridge Elementary School would sulk for a minute or so before giving the task a second try. These days, Jessica, 11, is doing remarkably well thanks to the school's Volunteer Reading Program that was launched in the fall. "I'm really proud of myself," she said. The program involves community volunteers meeting with pupils three to five times a week for about 15 minutes to practice reading "sight words" - words that pupils should be able to read without sounding them out. They also help pupils improve reading fluency - the accuracy and speed at which a child reads - and memorize multiplication tables.
FEATURES
July 14, 1999
School's out and parents will likely hear the summer lament, "I'M BORED!" Be prepared for those times with some of these learning games that use everyday household items. They can be fun for you and your child to do together.Likenesses and differences: Let your child sort and place things such as buttons, marbles or dried beans or noodles into each section of an egg carton, putting things that are alike in each section. As a variation, you could label each section with a different letter and write words beginning with those letters on small pieces of paper.
FEATURES
July 14, 1999
School's out and parents will likely hear the summer lament, "I'M BORED!" Be prepared for those times with some of these learning games that use everyday household items. They can be fun for you and your child to do together.Likenesses and differences: Let your child sort and place things such as buttons, marbles or dried beans or noodles into each section of an egg carton, putting things that are alike in each section. As a variation, you could label each section with a different letter and write words beginning with those letters on small pieces of paper.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
After reading "Because You're Lucky," write each of these sight words on a 3-by-5 index card. Place five words at a time in front of your child. Give clues to describe the new word, then ask your child to say the word and use it in a sentence. For example, using the first row of five cards say, "Can you be a good detective and find a new word that means battle?" Your child should pick up the card with the word "fight" and use it in a sentence. As a variation, place four of the sight words in a row in front of your child.
NEWS
April 18, 1999
Editor's note: In her biweekly column, Jerdine Nolen today explores spelling and what parents can do to help their children master this challenge.Spelling is the forming of words with letters in an established order. It is a developmental skill, so practice is essential. Seeing correctly spelled words and learning to write the proper sequence of letters in a word can help us improve. It takes a lot of practice in the beginning until this method of representing sounds and letter is mastered.
FEATURES
January 27, 1999
Children love to listen to stories about family members and events. In the story ``Grandfather's Journey,'' the author's grandfather traveled from Japan to California by steamship. Ask your child, ``How do you think the author made the same journey when he turned old enough to travel?'' Let your child tell about some of the ways he has traveled with his own family.steamshiptrain schoolriverboatsailboattruckjetbusbicyclevanhelicopterWrite the sight words above on 5''-by-7'' index cards. Add any new means of travel your child brought up in the discussion about family journeys.
FEATURES
October 14, 1998
October has been designated Learning Disabilities Awareness Month. In the Oct. 7 edition of Parent and Child, reading specialist Susan Rapp described this reading disability and its far-reaching impact. Today, she offers some advice to parents.If you suspect your child has dyslexia, the first step is a thorough diagnosis, through the school referral system or privately. Once identified, an Individualized Educuation Program is written to include the most appropriate teaching techniques and to set goals for the child.
FEATURES
October 11, 1998
Turn sight words - and their consonant blends - into a matching game. Here's how to do it using eight words from "Danny: The Champion of the World."Preparation1. Take a piece of unlined 8-by-11-inch paper, and draw lines dividing it in half. Then draw lines dividing each half into fourths to make 8 grids.2. On each grid, write these consonant blends in any order:bl, br, cl, dr, fr, sl, st, tr.3. On index cards, write these eight sight words from "Danny: The Champion of the World": black, breathes, cloak, dream, friendly, story, sleeping, tree.
FEATURES
October 14, 1998
October has been designated Learning Disabilities Awareness Month. In the Oct. 7 edition of Parent and Child, reading specialist Susan Rapp described this reading disability and its far-reaching impact. Today, she offers some advice to parents.If you suspect your child has dyslexia, the first step is a thorough diagnosis, through the school referral system or privately. Once identified, an Individualized Educuation Program is written to include the most appropriate teaching techniques and to set goals for the child.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2000
Every fall, teachers know that before they start on new material, they'll have to play catch-up - and for students who were below grade level in June, making up for that time lost during the summer is even harder. That's one reason why administrators at Running Brook Elementary School in Columbia started a four-week summer program this year for children who were working below grade level in reading and math. The school has had a summer program for many years, said Principal Marion Miller, but this year, school district officials gave Running Brook more money to focus on reading and math for second-graders moving up to third grade.
FEATURES
June 21, 1998
Sight Words for "Raising Dragons."Guess the word:babyagainwasdayfromlittleloudmothernighteverywherebelievecropsSight words are words that your child recognizes instantly without analysis. The larger the store of sight words, the more quickly and fluently the child is able to read. Words can be taken from your child's school work, from stories even the grocery store shelves. Keep the words in a box to enjoy and review.Try this activity with words from "Raising Dragons" to build visual discrimination:Print the words on index cards.
FEATURES
April 5, 1998
Today's list of "sight words" can be found in our Story Time selection, "The Selfish Giant.""Sight words" are the words that occur most commonly in all reading materials. While many sight words can be phonetically sounded out, most become readily recognizable through repetition.Young children often learn to associate spoken words with printed forms on signs, cereal boxes or television screens before they learn to read from books.See if your child can find these words in "The Selfish Giant."
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