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Sierra Leone

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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 20, 2000
UNITED NATIONS - The Security Council increased the number of soldiers allowed in the U.N. peacekeeping force in Sierra Leone by 2,000 yesterday and is likely to expand the force by several thousand more in the next week or two. The Sierra Leone mission, originally limited to 11,000 soldiers by the council, is the largest U.N. peacekeeping operation. The increase was required after reinforcements from Bangladesh, Jordan and India arrived this week Those troops were expected to push the force above the limit set in February, before the United Nations took over peacekeeping in Sierra Leone from a regional contingent led by Nigeria.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
A man who was admitted to the National Institute of Health in Bethesda last week after being exposed to Ebola was released Tuesday, after his symptoms were determined not to be related to the virus, the NIH said. The patient was identified only as an American doctor who had a "high-risk exposure" when he was accidentally stuck with a needle while treating patients of the virus in Sierra Leone. He flew back to the U.S. and was admitted to the NIH Clinical Center's Special Clinical Studies Unit on Sept.
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NEWS
June 5, 1997
MAJ. JOHNNY PAUL KOROMA shattered the 1996 accord ending five years of anarchy in Sierra Leone. On May 25, he deposed the elected president, Ahmed Tejan Kabbah, who fled. Major Koroma's troops are children with assault rifles and rebels who launched civil war in 1991.The coup undoes the progress that the poor country of 4.5 million people in West Africa was finally making. It repudiates the 53-nation Organization of African Unity's (OAU) slow march toward stability and democracy in Africa.
NEWS
Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
An American doctor who was exposed to Ebola while volunteering to treat patients with the virus in Sierra Leone was admitted to the National Institute of Health in Bethesda on Sunday, the institute said. The patient will be treated at the NIH Clinical Center's Special Clinical Studies Unit, which is "specifically designed to provide high-level isolation capabilities" and staffed by experts on infectious diseases and critical care, according to an NIH release. "The unit staff is trained in strict infection control practices optimized to prevent spread of potentially transmissible agents such as Ebola," the institute said.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 9, 1999
FREETOWN, Sierra Leone -- When drunken rebel leaders staggered into a downtown newspaper office recently and slapped around the editor, nobody was surprised. Nobody did anything about it, either, because the attackers could soon be ministers in the country's new government.The Sierra Leone peace accord, signed July 7 but not yet implemented, stipulates that Revolutionary United Front (RUF) warlord Foday Sankoh will become vice president. His officers have been guaranteed four ministerial positions and his troops, many of whom hacked off the limbs of civilians and raped young girls, have been offered amnesty.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2000
The director of Catholic Relief Services operations in war-torn Sierra Leone said yesterday that he hopes to expand help to thousands more of the country's displaced civilians but is hampered by a shaky United Nations peacekeeping force and the persistence of rebel fighters. Jim McLaughlin, director of the Baltimore-based agency's operations in Sierra Leone, was in the United States this week with Sierra Leone program director Baika Sesay and Bishop George Biguzzi, the Roman Catholic leader in rebel-held Makeni, to lobby U.N. officials and the Clinton administration for better protection.
NEWS
February 17, 2001
THE CALAMITY in the interior of Guinea is a slaughter of innocents. Civil warfare is invading from Liberia and Sierra Leone. The world community cannot bring aid to refugees of one country without confronting the anarchy of all. The crisis would not wait for the new regime in Washington to name its representative at the United Nations or chief policy-maker for Africa. It faces Secretary of State Colin Powell and President Bush now. Liberia, settled by freed U.S. slaves and modeled on U.S. institutions, sits on the west coast of Africa.
TOPIC
By Leonard H. Robinson Jr | May 21, 2000
NEWS OF THE capture of Sierra Leonean rebel leader Foday Sankoh was cheered last week by most residents of Freetown, the embattled capital of the small West African nation. But the U.S.-brokered peace accord and a United Nations peacekeeping mission there still teeter on the brink of collapse. While Sankoh is in government custody, an estimated 15,000 Revolutionary United Front (RUF) guerrillas still control large parts of the country and remain the single largest threat to peace. The security situation in the diamond-rich country improved somewhat after last week's insertion of 800 British marines, the promised airlift of 1,800 Nigerian troops, and the re-arming of pro-government militias and former Sierra Leonean soldiers.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2001
Sitting shoulder to shoulder in crisp Catholic school uniforms, about 200 East Baltimore children gazed at three young West African visitors who came to thank them yesterday for collecting pennies to help them seek treatment for their war wounds: severed arms and legs. At SS. James and John Catholic Elementary School, pupils exchanged shy smiles with the small delegation from Sierra Leone, a country wracked by a decade-long war in which rebels have fought to gain control of its diamond mines.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 21, 2000
WASHINGTON - Amid the destruction and crushed hopes in Sierra Leone, one of the most significant casualties is the credibility of United Nations peacekeepers, who have failed for the fifth time in less than a decade to prevent local hatreds from exploding into butchery. The hundreds of dead in the small west African nation, the kidnapping of 500 U.N. soldiers and the thousands of refugees have again exposed the confusion and weakness that regularly grip the world body in the face of war. "You have 7,000 peacekeepers on the ground in Sierra Leone.
HEALTH
Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
An American physician exposed to the Ebola virus in Sierra Leone is expected to be admitted to the National Institutes of Health, officials at the Bethesda-based agency said Saturday in a statement. NIH officials said that the patient, who was volunteering in an Ebola treatment unit in Sierra Leone, is expected to be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center for observation as well as to take part in a clinical study. Officials offered no additional information about the patient. "Out of an abundance of caution, the patient will be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center's special clinical studies unit that is specifically designed to provide high-level isolation capabilities and is staffed by infectious diseases and critical care specialists," NIH officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
The author Ishmael Beah grew up listening to his grandmother tell folk tales that explained, among other things, why a spider has a narrow waist. He quickly realized that beneath the whimsy were hidden life lessons he was expected to master. "I would [sit] around the fire every evening and ask my grandmother what the stories meant, and she would refuse to tell me," Beah said. "The stories were like medicine. I was supposed to find the meanings for myself and let them strengthen me. " The boy needed all the strengthening he could get when he was kidnapped at age 13, drafted as a child soldier into Sierra Leone's civil war, and forced to commit atrocities.
FEATURES
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2011
After going on yearly mission trips dating back to the mid-1990s, four friends decided they wanted to do more. So in 2007, they began their own nonprofit, Baltimore-based Healing Hands Foundation. They focused on providing surgical care to underprivileged people and have since gone to Ecuador, Sierra Leone, Guatemala, the Philippines and Colombia. "When you do something like that, you get hooked and want to do more to help," said Marco Avila, an engineer born in Ecuador who began volunteering on missions as an interpreter.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
World Hope International, a Christian relief and development nonprofit group, has been providing charitable aid and small loans to farmers and entrepreneurs in Sierra Leone for years. Now the Northern Virginia group wants to go into business with those it aims to help. It has started a for-profit arm to build an industrial park and helped launch a juice plant that would process the West African country's bounty of mangoes and pineapples. World Hope's effort is part of a recalibration of how some nonprofit organizations approach their work — applying the strategies of capitalism to achieve their goals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | December 14, 2008
Here's the message I'm trying to get out to friends and acquaintances these days: Don't forward any more stupid Internet jokes to my in-box. Don't forward any more videos with the subject line "YOU GOTTA SEE THIS!" that show a frightened deer leaping across six lanes of interstate traffic or a cute 5-year-old landing a 600-pound shark on his dad's fishing boat. Don't forward another "HEALTH ALERT!" about the latest killer staph infection or another "COMPUTER ALERT!" about the latest virus that's going to wipe out my hard drive.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 28, 2008
I used to think no one in the whole world hated e-mail more than me, but that turns out to be wrong. Doctors, it seems, really hate e-mail. In fact, a new survey shows only 31 percent of doctors use e-mail to answer questions from patients outside the office. The rest still prefer the time-honored method of having a bored receptionist take your call, then calling you back days later, usually after your symptoms have subsided. According to a recent Associated Press article on the survey, there are lots of reasons doctors don't like e-mail.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 17, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Bob Moran, an American food aid worker with Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services, described yesterday how he escaped the fighting in Sierra Leone with his 9-year-old son last week.Moran, 49, a program monitoring officer with CRS, was robbed of his Mercedes car and other possessions when intruders forced their way into his house at the height of the clash between rebel forces and troops of the West African intervention force, ECOMOG.His house had become a refuge for about 20 members of his late wife's Sierra Leone family and friends during the fighting.
NEWS
May 10, 2000
ANARCHY in Sierra Leone is a threat to larger Africa. By taking hundreds of United Nations peacekeeping troops hostage, ragtag rebels supporting Foday Sankoh have undermined the chief tool the world community and African leaders have devised for dispute resolution on the continent. Peacekeepers come in after peace is agreed, to maintain its terms and create confidence. Mr. Sankoh agreed last July to quit insurrection and join the elected government of Ahmad Tejan Kabbah. He just didn't mean it. The troops sent to police the accord, mostly Zambians, were lightly trained and not expecting war. Mr. Sankoh's followers had little difficulty disarming many, stealing their vehicles and mowing down protesting civilians.
NEWS
August 15, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Product of `farm system' Rookie linebacker Antwan Barnes, a fourth-round draft pick from Florida International, looks to be the latest example of a player coming up through the "farm system" on the Ravens' defense. Sports baltimoresun.com/steele A jaw-dropping number What number of killings in a year will engender outrage in Baltimore? The columnist answers. Maryland baltimoresun.com/kane other voices Laura Vozzella on cellist, demolition -- Maryland Rob Kasper on the bounty of basil -- Taste 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY Poetry meeting -- At 7 p.m., check out Poet's Ink, a monthly meeting sponsored by the Maryland State Poetry and Literary Society.
NEWS
By NewHouse News Service | June 7, 2007
The millions spent on the trial could be spent on the people of Sierra Leone, to support the people who suffered. There are people for whom surviving is really hard. The wounds are in our minds." - MUCTARR JALLOH, 29, who moved to New York after enduring atrocities during the 10-year civil war in his native Sierra Leone, including the amputation of his right hand and ear, on the war crimes trial of former Liberian President Charles Taylor, accused of arming and controlling rebels who raped, mutilated and enslaved civilians NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE
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