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By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2003
If you have only one or two telephone jacks, in odd places, in your house, Siemens Gigaset SL3501 expandable cordless telephone system ($220) might appeal to you. Once you buy the SL3501 base kit, you can create wireless connections with up to four Gigaset SL30 telephones ($150) - or any Siemens 4000 or 4200 series telephone handset. Just plug in your SL3501 base station to the telephone jack, then find locations for the handsets. You'll need a nearby electrical outlet for each phone station; these recharge the handset battery in each handset.
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NEWS
September 7, 2014
I read your article about the proposed maglev train with interest but was surprised that you did not write more about the one that is operational in Shanghai, China ( "Billions lined up for 'maglev,'" Sept. 4). It was built by Siemens and runs from downtown to the airport. I rode on it and they have a speed meter on it which gets to 400 kilometers per hour (or 260 miles per hour). It was very smooth and comfortable. One interesting thing our guide mentioned is that all of the drivers are women because the men would not go fast enough for the schedule.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 11, 2001
LONDON - Marconi PLC and Siemens AG said yesterday that they will cut 5,000 jobs to trim costs as a slowing economy crimps sales of telecommunications equipment and mobile phones. Marconi, the UK's largest maker of phone equipment, said it will cut 3,000 jobs - 5.5 percent of its staff - in the next 12 months. Siemens, Europe's No. 2 mobile- phone producer, will eliminate 2,000 temporary workers, a quarter of those making handsets. Slowing growth has led phone companies to reduce equipment purchases.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
The University of Maryland, College Park plans to announce Tuesday the receipt of a software grant valued at $750 million from a division of Siemens Corp. - the largest donation of its kind for both the electrical engineering giant and the state's flagship university. The software - used for product design, manufacturing and management - has already helped NASA develop the Mars rover "Curiosity" and helped the Callaway Golf Co. improve its clubs. At the university, it will enhance school entries in racing and robotics competitions, but also give engineering students and staff the streamlined ability to create the machines they dream up, some of which could save lives.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 22, 2004
The insurgency in Iraq has driven two major contractors, General Electric and Siemens, to suspend most of their operations there, raising new doubts about the American-led effort to rebuild the country while hostilities continue. Spokesmen for the contractors declined to discuss their operations in Iraq, but the shutdowns were confirmed by officials at the Iraqi Ministry of Electricity, the Coalition Provisional Authority and other companies working directly with GE and Siemens in Iraq.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan | November 19, 2006
Three Maryland teenagers narrowly missed winning a prestigious regional math and science contest in Pittsburgh yesterday and lost a chance to enter their research in a national competition. Serena Fasano, a senior at Glenelg High School in Howard County, was a runner-up for her discovery that a protein in yogurt blocked the growth of the bacteria that causes diarrhea. The other second-place scientists from Maryland in the Siemens Competition were Jeffrey Guo and Victoria Yao, both of Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 10, 1998
Some bosses say productive work can occur only if employees toil away in their work stations or cubicles -- and with few distractions. Strategy sessions at chance meetings in the hallway or banter over coffee can't measure up, they say.At Siemens Power Transmission and Distribution in Wendell, N.C., a unit of Siemens, the big German manufacturer, it is just the opposite.Management removed the plant's time clocks and expanded the cafeteria, putting in pens, pencils, markers, paper, flip charts -- even overhead projectors -- to encourage lingering lunch breaks, more talk and thus, more training.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1993
DEC cuts losses in halfDigital Equipment Corp., the computer giant that is struggling to return to profitability, said yesterday that it cut net losses by more than half in the latest quarter. Wall Street responded enthusiastically, sending Digital's stock $7 higher on the New York Stock Exchange to $41.875 as volume surged to move than 5 million shares.The second-largest U.S. computer company said net losses fell in the second quarter that ended Dec. 26 to $73.9 million, or 57 cents a share, from $155.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
Three students at Glenwood Middle School have been recognized nationally for their recycling efforts. Eighth-graders Jessica Dietz, Grant Whitman and Zachary Wright received honorable mention in the Siemens We Can Change the World Challenge for decreasing waste at the school. Teams from 22 schools were recognized nationwide as state finalists May 4. The Glenwood students, along with their teacher, Amanda Richardson, documented a yearlong effort to decrease waste at the school, while increasing the amount of materials recycled.
NEWS
September 7, 2014
I read your article about the proposed maglev train with interest but was surprised that you did not write more about the one that is operational in Shanghai, China ( "Billions lined up for 'maglev,'" Sept. 4). It was built by Siemens and runs from downtown to the airport. I rode on it and they have a speed meter on it which gets to 400 kilometers per hour (or 260 miles per hour). It was very smooth and comfortable. One interesting thing our guide mentioned is that all of the drivers are women because the men would not go fast enough for the schedule.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | April 2, 2013
Two Maryland educators have been chosen to take part in a prestigious, national fellowship program focused on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. Green Street Academy teacher Desmond Rowe will be among 40 educators from across the nation heading to the Siemens Teachers as Researchers fellowship program in July, according to a release from the corporation. Amanda Peretich, a teacher from Calvert High School in Prince Frederick, was also awarded the fellowship this year.  According to Siements, "the program is designed to empower teachers to bring the excitement of authentic research into their classrooms and inspire students to pursue [STEM]
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Amtrak will acquire 70 new power-saving electric locomotives as part of a plan to rejuvenate its aging fleet on the Northeast Corridor, the manufacturer Siemens AG is expected to announce Friday. The company has been awarded a $468 million contract to provide the new generation of locomotives over a six-year period. The engines are expected to eventually replace all of Amtrak's AEM-7 and HHP-8 locomotives — breakdown-prone models used by both the national passenger railroad and Maryland's MARC commuter service.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
Three students at Glenwood Middle School have been recognized nationally for their recycling efforts. Eighth-graders Jessica Dietz, Grant Whitman and Zachary Wright received honorable mention in the Siemens We Can Change the World Challenge for decreasing waste at the school. Teams from 22 schools were recognized nationwide as state finalists May 4. The Glenwood students, along with their teacher, Amanda Richardson, documented a yearlong effort to decrease waste at the school, while increasing the amount of materials recycled.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan | November 19, 2006
Three Maryland teenagers narrowly missed winning a prestigious regional math and science contest in Pittsburgh yesterday and lost a chance to enter their research in a national competition. Serena Fasano, a senior at Glenelg High School in Howard County, was a runner-up for her discovery that a protein in yogurt blocked the growth of the bacteria that causes diarrhea. The other second-place scientists from Maryland in the Siemens Competition were Jeffrey Guo and Victoria Yao, both of Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 22, 2004
The insurgency in Iraq has driven two major contractors, General Electric and Siemens, to suspend most of their operations there, raising new doubts about the American-led effort to rebuild the country while hostilities continue. Spokesmen for the contractors declined to discuss their operations in Iraq, but the shutdowns were confirmed by officials at the Iraqi Ministry of Electricity, the Coalition Provisional Authority and other companies working directly with GE and Siemens in Iraq.
NEWS
January 24, 2004
On January 18, 2004; MERRY PATRICIA SIEMEN. She is survived by her son and daughter Martin Siemen and Anne Rutherford and four grandchildren. A Memorial Service will be held February 7, 2 PM at 534 Heavytree Hill, Severna Park. Send donations in her memory to Chesapeake Bay Foundation, 6 Herndon Avenue, Annapolis, MD 21403.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 17, 1998
RICHMOND, Va. -- Motorola Inc., the world's No. 3 chip maker, said yesterday that it is halting construction of a $3 billion computer-chip plant near Richmond, because of low prices and slumping demand for semiconductors.Construction, which was delayed once before amid a 1997 chip-market decline, will stop within days and be halted indefinitely. The West Creek, Va., plant would have employed as many as 5,000 people, and made high-performance chips for pagers and hand-held computers.Chip makers are struggling with weak demand and plunging prices amid slower personal computer demand and economic problems in Asia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | August 27, 2001
The tiny Siemens S40 is a quality cell phone with a global reach Siemens' S40 phone may conveniently slip into a shirt pocket, but it will take you around the world. The S40 uses the Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM), so it can be used in 6,500 cities in North America and 171 countries around the world. Because of the differing wireless systems throughout the world, quite a few Americans can't use their cellular telephones abroad. By using GSM, the S40 can take advantage of almost 70 percent of the world's digital wireless networks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2003
If you have only one or two telephone jacks, in odd places, in your house, Siemens Gigaset SL3501 expandable cordless telephone system ($220) might appeal to you. Once you buy the SL3501 base kit, you can create wireless connections with up to four Gigaset SL30 telephones ($150) - or any Siemens 4000 or 4200 series telephone handset. Just plug in your SL3501 base station to the telephone jack, then find locations for the handsets. You'll need a nearby electrical outlet for each phone station; these recharge the handset battery in each handset.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | August 27, 2001
The tiny Siemens S40 is a quality cell phone with a global reach Siemens' S40 phone may conveniently slip into a shirt pocket, but it will take you around the world. The S40 uses the Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM), so it can be used in 6,500 cities in North America and 171 countries around the world. Because of the differing wireless systems throughout the world, quite a few Americans can't use their cellular telephones abroad. By using GSM, the S40 can take advantage of almost 70 percent of the world's digital wireless networks.
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