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NEWS
July 18, 2014
The graffiti artists in Carroll County may be spelling-challenged but their message is clear ( "Carroll's revealing 'illeagle' graffiti," July 15). Moreover that message is becoming clear all over the United States as we watch in horror what's happening at the border. It good to see so many citizens will take a stand against the government's plan to foist thousands of illegal migrants on our communities. This is not a political issue at all. We are on pace to having 75,000 undocumented child migrants in our midst this year, and to say that is a mere 0.02 percent of the population is to forget these folks are criminals.
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NEWS
July 18, 2014
The graffiti artists in Carroll County may be spelling-challenged but their message is clear ( "Carroll's revealing 'illeagle' graffiti," July 15). Moreover that message is becoming clear all over the United States as we watch in horror what's happening at the border. It good to see so many citizens will take a stand against the government's plan to foist thousands of illegal migrants on our communities. This is not a political issue at all. We are on pace to having 75,000 undocumented child migrants in our midst this year, and to say that is a mere 0.02 percent of the population is to forget these folks are criminals.
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NEWS
By Nadav Safran | September 18, 1990
THE ARAB FACTOR has been badly misunderstood in the debate about our strategic options and objectives in the Gulf. Those who advocate a strategy of siege have asserted that an assault would cause the United States to lose the precious Arab coalition that has coalesced around it, or that it would unleash a tidal wave of hostility against America that would sweep away the regimes we are trying to defend. If anything, a siege strategy entrails greater risks of complications.The bulk of the Arab peoples don't know much about the business of developing options.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | May 6, 2013
Even if Bryant McKinnie does not prove to be an upgrade over Michael Oher, his return to the Ravens and the left tackle position should at least strengthen the Ravens at left guard and right tackle, where Oher will likely play. Make no mistake, though, Oher will still be in the crosshairs of formidable NFL pass rushers over at right tackle. In a story I wrote in December about Oher's future with the Ravens, I mentioned the theory that in today's NFL, the left tackle position, while still the most important position on the offensive line, might not be as valuable as it was a decade or so ago when Jonathan Ogden was steering pass rushers clear of Ravens quarterbacks.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | January 27, 1994
MOSCOW -- Fifty years ago today, the valiant people of Leningrad emerged, transformed, from 900 days of darkness and death. They were ordinary people made heroic by their simple refusal to give up.By Jan. 27, 1944, when the German blockade of Leningrad was lifted, 1 1/2 million people had died from starvation and illness, ravaged by cold, disease and nearly constant bombardment. Two and a half million somehow survived.There were more Russian deaths in the siege of Leningrad than American deaths in all the wars the United States has ever fought.
FEATURES
By Neely Tucker and Neely Tucker,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 20, 1994
Why stay?It's the logical question to put to any Sarajevan who has had a chance to leave the city during its 20-month siege. It's the one that newspaper columnist Zlatko Dizdarevic answers in this powerfully evocative, disturbingly beautiful collection of essays taken from Sarajevo's daily paper, Oslobodenje (Liberty).The answer, like these essays, is profoundly simple: because they led a civilized life before the war, and decent people do not let themselves be bullied out of doing the right thing.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | January 12, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- As cleanup efforts began for the mess left by a powerful Pacific storm that killed four people, rain-soaked Southern California got some good news: A weeklong siege of record-breaking storms may be over.Another large storm initially expected to arrive Saturday probably won't materialize, which means overnight showers may signal the end of a procession of storms that left the region reeling, forecasters said yesterday."We have a little disturbance off the coast that looks like it will move through overnight.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | November 28, 1998
QUICK, WHILE THE movie's still in local theaters! Some of you rush out and see "The Siege" and tell me if its critics are right -- that it paints all Arabs as terrorists -- or if they simply watched a different film from the one I saw.Edward Zwick, who directed the film, and screenwriters Lawrence Wright and Menno Meyjes bent over backward to say just the opposite: that the overwhelming majority of Arab-Americans are loyal and law-abiding. That phrase isrehashed so many times throughout the movie that you could lose track of the number of times it's said.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1998
"The Siege," which has Islamic terrorists causing chaos in New York, has already been decried by Arab and Islamic groups who fear it will fan the flames of prejudice and mistrust.But director Edward Zwick's real targets are the politicians and law enforcers fighting them. Zwick and co-screenwriters Lawrence Wright and Menno Meyjes are asking: Can a free society exist when it's under attack by a group pledged to destroy it?The answer is ultimately ambiguous, because the film turns on one of Hollywood's favorite cop-outs: people who do the right thing, even when doing so is totally out of character.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | July 15, 1995
It may be that after his last film, the dreadful "On Dangerous Ground," Steven Segal had nowhere to go but up. Still, his "Under Siege 2: Dark Territory" isn't half bad.But it isn't more than half good either. It's pretty much the basic Segal thing saved from the star's vanity and tuned professionally to young male audience tastes: a big, stupid plot, lots of mean-spirited violence, some dim repartee, a fair amount of synthetic excitement. For $7, you could get a lot less.This time, it's "Die Hard on a Train."
NEWS
By Laila El-Haddad | June 2, 2010
Early Monday, Israeli navy commandos attacked a flotilla of humanitarian aid destined for the occupied Gaza Strip in international waters. The ships were carrying 10,000 tons of humanitarian supplies that are banned from Gaza under Israel's directives, including toys, wheelchairs, athletic equipment and medicines. The multinational aid convoy to Gaza included a former U.S. ambassador, a U.S. Navy veteran and 10 other U.S. citizens. The Memorial Day massacre left nine people dead and dozens more injured.
NEWS
February 24, 2009
There's but one plausible explanation for the arrest of 24 Hispanic men by federal immigration agents outside a Fells Point convenience store in 2007 - racial profiling. A recently released videotape and government documents detailing the incident provide a vivid look at how easily law enforcement can run amok when officers are only interested in making their numbers look good. The officers were agents of the U.S. Homeland Security Department's Immigration and Customs Enforcement division, and they were supposed to be looking for illegal immigrants who had been ordered to leave the country.
NEWS
By Faye Fiore and Faye Fiore,Los Angeles Times | September 16, 2007
Dead Certain The Presidency of George W. Bush By Robert Draper Free Press/ 480 pages/ $28 When a national magazine correspondent first sought White House cooperation for a real-time biography of President Bush, it was no surprise that the most secretive administration in memory said no, even to a fellow Texan. But, 18 months later - his presidency beset by an unpopular war, the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and the lowest poll numbers of his career - George W. Bush opened the doors to the Oval Office, ignoring the advice of his wife and his chief strategist in an attempt to shape his legacy even before he packs his bags.
BUSINESS
By Stephanie Newton and Stephanie Newton,Sun reporter | June 28, 2007
Mario Armstrong knows exactly where he will be at 5:50 p.m. tomorrow - perched in a lawn chair outside an AT&T store north of Towson with a supply of food and water and a Mac PowerBook on his lap, fired up and ready to go. His mother in Towson and brother in Washington will be manning their home computers, poised to click on "confirm purchase" when the clock ticks 6 - the witching hour for one of the most anticipated and hyped technology launches ever,...
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,Los Angeles Times | December 3, 2006
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- The sit-in staged by Hezbollah supporters so far has done little to dislodge the U.S.-backed government, but it has managed to turn the Lebanese capital inside out - literally. Some of the poorest and most marginalized people in the country, Lebanon's Shiite Muslims, have abandoned their homes in suburban slums to camp out on the nation's most expensive bit of real estate. Often trudging through Lebanese history as war refugees, they have managed to displace Lebanon's wealthiest shop owners.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 29, 2006
OAXACA, Mexico -- Hundreds of federal riot police officers and soldiers took up positions outside this besieged tourist city in southern Mexico yesterday, poised to end an increasingly violent protest that has shut the downtown for five months and left a dozen people dead. Tension hung heavily in the air as night fell. Protesters appeared to be digging in at the barricades that they had constructed around town from sand bags, old tires, barbed wire and burned-out vehicles. The federal government issued a statement ordering the protesters to "immediately hand over streets, plazas, public buildings and private property" so that officials could "guarantee public order and adherence to the law, as well as preserve respect for the population's individual guarantees."
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | January 27, 1994
MOSCOW -- Fifty years ago today, the valiant people of Leningrad emerged, transformed, from 900 days of darkness and death. They were ordinary people made heroic by their simple refusal to give up.By Jan. 27, 1944, when the German blockade of Leningrad was lifted, one and a half million people had died from starvation and illness, ravaged by cold, disease and nearly constant bombardment. Two and a half million somehow survived.There were more Russian deaths in the siege of Leningrad than American deaths in all the wars the United States has ever fought.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A Senate subcommittee will begin shining the spotlight today on critical issues flowing from the government's 1992 siege at Ruby Ridge, Idaho.One of the biggest is: Have the judgment and competence of U.S. law enforcement officials been compromised in cases involving people who hold strong anti-government views?The hearings come on the heels of recent House hearings into the 1993 Waco tragedy, the ill-fated Texas standoff that occurred six months after the Ruby Ridge siege. The Senate panel will explore how white separatist Randy Weaver was first confronted by federal agents, what led to efforts to arrest him, and whether mistakes, miscalculations and a lack of professionalism by federal marshals and FBI agents preceded their fatal shooting of Mr. Weaver's wife, Vicki, and 14-year-old son, Sammy, after a U.S. marshal was killed.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | October 16, 2006
Opera-goers are used to time travel. These days, conceptual directors think nothing of moving characters from 18th-century Seville in a Mozart opera to, say, Trump Tower. Or 19th-century Italian peasants in a Donizetti comedy to a 1950s American diner. Or mythological figures in Wagner epics to the Victorian era and even outer space. A case of backward motion, however, is something of a rarity. And, it's something of a misstep in the Baltimore Opera Company's valiant, but uneven, production of a neglected Rossini work, The Siege of Corinth.
NEWS
By ALEX RODRIGUEZ and ALEX RODRIGUEZ,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 27, 2006
MOSCOW -- A court in southern Russia sentenced the only known surviving hostage-taker in the Beslan school siege to life in prison yesterday, a ruling that failed to appease many victims' families who had hoped the trial would expose the role negligence by Russian authorities played in the siege's deadly outcome. The court convicted Nur-Pashi Kulayev, 25, on charges of terrorism and murder for his role in the September 2004 siege that killed 331 people, 186 of them children. Judge Tamerlan Aguzarov said Kulayev deserved the death penalty but explained the court was bound by Russia's moratorium on capital punishment, issued a decade ago when it became a member of the Council of Europe.
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