Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSidewalk Cafes
IN THE NEWS

Sidewalk Cafes

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 24, 1995
Annapolis Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins postponed a vote yesterday on whether to legalize sidewalk cafes downtown because of an alderman's illness.Louise Hammond, who represents the historic district, could not attend the meeting because of bronchitis and an ear infection, city officials said.The vote has been delayed until Nov. 13 because the sidewalk cafe legislation deals solely with Ms. Hammond's ward. The expected approval of the measure will end a year of debate and make sidewalk cafes permanent in downtown Annapolis.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Tribune Newspapers | November 15, 2009
- " Mescolati, non agitati " is Italian for "stirred, not shaken," but to me it means a good martini is hard to find here - and in a lot of other places, for that matter. I went looking for one on the last Sunday evening in August, the nadir of the year in Rome. It was hot even at 7 p.m., and everything was closed because Romans linger at the beach as long as they can before returning to town to face September. On the Via Veneto, prime martini territory given its Fellini-esque "La Dolce Vita" connections, lobby bars in the grand hotels were shut tight, and maitre d's in oversize suits beckoned me into sad, empty sidewalk cafes.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 19, 1995
ANNAPOLIS' CITY COUNCIL has set a dangerous precedent by allowing sidewalk cafes on a trial basis. Not because there's anything wrong with sidewalk cafes; done correctly, they would be a charming addition to the state capital, as well as provide a needed economic boost.It's the way the council is going about bringing cafes to the city that's the problem. Basically, the council is trying to dance around the city code in order to let restaurants suffering from the ongoing reconstruction of Main Street set up outdoor dining in time for this fall's boat show and the 150th anniversary celebration of the U.S. Naval Academy.
NEWS
By Olivia Bobrowsky and Olivia Bobrowsky,olivia.bobrowsky@baltsun.com | July 5, 2009
Josh Cohen grew up a saxophone player, studying music at the University of Maryland. Then Bill Clinton ran for president in 1992, and Cohen switched paths at the age of 18. "That was the first national presidential campaign that I really followed, and it just engaged me in a way that nothing had engaged me before," said the Annapolis native who's now in the race for mayor. "I realized that people can actually devote their time to working on issues that make a difference." The next semester, Cohen dropped his music classes and ended up graduating with a degree in economics.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1995
City Council members are dueling over how best to legalize sidewalk cafes in historic Annapolis, reviving a fight that polarized the panel as it planned the Main Street reconstruction project.Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins has introduced a conservative measure that would allow sidewalk cafes with sharp restrictions while Ward 8 Alderman Ellen O. Moyer wants to replace it with language more friendly to restaurant owners."I think the mayor's bill is prohibitive," Ms. Moyer said yesterday. "It's anti-business, and it's really anti-sidewalk cafe."
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1995
The Annapolis city council came one step closer last night to allowing sidewalk cafes downtown when aldermen killed a bill that would have placed tough restrictions on the establishments."
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | November 14, 1994
Annapolis restaurateur Jerry Hardesty steps on one of his best business opportunities every day; the porch of the Middleton Tavern on Market Space.Customers are willing to stand for an hour for the opportunity to eat and drink at one of Mr. Hardesty's 40 outdoor tables near the City Dock. And Mr. Hardesty, 52, argues that other downtown restaurants should be able to set up their own sidewalk cafes.The potential for sidewalk cafes has been near the center of the battle over the reconstruction of Main Street.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | November 14, 1994
Annapolis restaurateur Jerry Hardesty steps on one of his best business opportunities every day; the porch of the Middleton Tavern on Market Space.Customers are willing to stand for an hour for the opportunity to eat and drink at one of Mr. Hardesty's 40 outdoor tables near the City Dock. And Mr. Hardesty, 52, argues that other downtown restaurants should be able to set up their own sidewalk cafes.The potential for sidewalk cafes has been near the center of the battle over the reconstruction of Main Street.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1995
Sidewalk cafes, long a taboo in Annapolis' historic downtown, could line the streets before the end of the month if a controversial resolution wins city council approval tomorrow."
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
Annapolis' Historic District Commission is likely to approve a scaled-down version of the city's Main Street reconstruction plan next week that could prevent restaurants from opening sidewalk cafes.The commission, which must approve all development downtown, agreed at a work session Monday to approve the city's plan, if the sidewalk width at two proposed pedestrian gathering places at the foot of Main Street is reduced and two other relatively minor changes are made. The commission is to vote on the project Dec. 14"I think we're moving into the final phase on Main Street," said Donna Hole, a city historic preservation planner who serves as staff to the commission.
NEWS
November 20, 1996
THE FIRST SEASON is over. The verdict is in: Annapolis sidewalk cafes were a success that added to the state capital's charm. After the City Council gave the green light to the opening of sidewalk cafes last spring, 21 such operations appeared in downtown Annapolis and Eastport. Into autumn, none of the dire predictions of opponents materialized."They haven't junked up the place, which was a concern. Some of them look quite nice and people really enjoy them," conceded an officer of the Ward One Residents Association, which fought the change.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
Sidewalk cafes could open in Annapolis' downtown Historic District within weeks, depending on the weather.Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins and six aldermen, enough for a quorum, voted unanimously in a special meeting yesterday to advance the starting date for sidewalk cafes to April 1 from May 1.The vote corrects a narrow interpretation of the original law, which forced businesses to wait until May 1 to begin sidewalk cafes, said Alderman Ellen O. Moyer, an 8th...
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1995
The Annapolis city council is scheduled to decide tonight whether to allow more late-night bars in the historic district, but some officials say the vote may be postponed indefinitely."
NEWS
October 24, 1995
Annapolis Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins postponed a vote yesterday on whether to legalize sidewalk cafes downtown because of an alderman's illness.Louise Hammond, who represents the historic district, could not attend the meeting because of bronchitis and an ear infection, city officials said.The vote has been delayed until Nov. 13 because the sidewalk cafe legislation deals solely with Ms. Hammond's ward. The expected approval of the measure will end a year of debate and make sidewalk cafes permanent in downtown Annapolis.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1995
The city council is poised to end a year of debate tonight and make sidewalk cafes legal in downtown Annapolis."Finally, they're coming," said Alderman M. Theresa DeGraff, a longtime proponent of the outdoor cafes. "I think we've done a good job meeting all the concerns that have come up."The issue remains controversial enough to promise at least one more clash among aldermen as the bill and proposed amendments come before them for votes tonight. Once the bill is passed, downtown restaurant owners will be able to open outdoor cafes without first seeking a public hearing or city council approval.
NEWS
October 6, 1995
THE VERDICT IS IN on sidewalk cafes. After a trial period, it's clear that sidewalk cafes are not going to turn the state capital into a den of iniquity. They're working just fine. They're charming. They add to the vibrant atmosphere that makes Annapolis so appealing. And customers like them. Restaurant owners say business has increased by 40 to 50 percent since the trial period began a few weeks ago -- news that is especially welcome considering what a struggle businesses have been enduring since the reconstruction of Main Street began last April.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | August 26, 1995
Everyone agrees that the spread of sidewalk cafes in Towson has added charm to the county seat."People feel like . . . they're in New York or Italy," says Doreen Ercolano of Gemelli Desserts on Allegheny Avenue, where sidewalk tables flourish at several eateries.There's just one problem: They're illegal.Spurred by complaints that outdoor tables were blocking sidewalks, county officials have scrambled to regulate Towson's dozen or so cafes -- almost a century after Baltimore tackled the problem.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1995
Annapolis residents have had several weeks to mull the addition of sidewalk cafes in the historic district. Tonight, they'll get to tell the city council how the establishments should be regulated.The council, which already has approved a measure to allow the outdoor tables on a temporary basis, will hear testimony on permanent legislation covering sidewalk cafes at 7 p.m. at City Hall.Both sides in the debate say they think the sidewalk cafes -- long banned in the historic district -- belong in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
Sidewalk cafes got rave reviews at an Annapolis City Council hearing last night, although some preservationists urged strict regulation of the appearance and licensing of such establishments."
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1995
Annapolis residents have had several weeks to mull the addition of sidewalk cafes in the historic district. Tonight, they'll get to tell the city council how the establishments should be regulated.The council, which already has approved a measure to allow the outdoor tables on a temporary basis, will hear testimony on permanent legislation covering sidewalk cafes at 7 p.m. at City Hall.Both sides in the debate say they think the sidewalk cafes -- long banned in the historic district -- belong in Annapolis.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.