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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1996
MARYLAND IS among the smallest of these United States (42nd in size) and more densely populated than all but five other states. In a word, it's crowded.But Daniel Boone knows better.Dan, no relation to the fabled pioneer, and a much better naturalist -- says it's all in how and where one looks at the state.Boone once drove from marshy, oystery Girdletree, on the southeastern corner of the Shore, to the strip-mined mountains of Kempton, in Garrett County's southwestern corner.It took eight hours -- drive north as long, and you'd be in Boston.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
Bonaventure von P. "Duke" Wachter, a retired State Highway Administration civil engineer who worked on numerous highway projects throughout Maryland, died May 23 of cancer at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. He was 69. "He was probably the best boss I've ever had in my life, and he was probably the best on-the-job-trained engineer that the State Highway Administration ever had," said Tony Smith, a former SHA civil engineer who lives in Nottingham. "Duke came up through the ranks.
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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | February 12, 1995
HARVEY -- The Nature Conservancy of Maryland has bought 161 acres in the shadow of Sideling Hill -- where a highway cut is an unusual geological attraction for tourists -- to help protect one of the state's most pristine and least disturbed ecosystems.The tract, in the Sideling Hill Creek watershed in western Washington County, was bought from Thomas and Mary Creek, who will continue to live on another parcel not purchased by the nonprofit group, said Courtney Shepardson, a conservancy spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
Kenneth N. Weaver, who for nearly 30 years headed the Maryland Geological Survey, which named its Baltimore headquarters for him, died July 7 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Jacksonville resident was 83. Dr. Weaver, the son of Reformed Mennonite farmers, was born and raised in Lancaster County, Pa. After graduating from East Lampeter High School in 1945, he joined the merchant marine and served aboard ships as a radio operator in the South Pacific in the fading days of World War II. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1950 from Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster.
NEWS
September 14, 1993
WE LOVE the Nature Conservancy when it buys up some little piece of Maryland to hold harmless the habitat of some disappearing flora or fauna.The latest such effort, described in the Nature Conservancy of Maryland's fall newsletter, concerns the endangered harperella (Ptilimnium nodosum), a member of the carrot family that grows to less than two feet tall and has tiny white flowers resembling Queen Anne's lace.There's a drawing of Ptilimnium in the newsletter, and it looks for all the world like a carrot (well, like the carrot plant, not the edible root)
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | July 28, 1991
SIDELING HILL -- Maryland will be putting its rock collection on display in a big way on Washington County's Sideling Hill this week.On Friday, as part of the state's official designation ceremonies for Interstate 68, the Sideling Hill Visitors Center will open, a $5 million geological showstopper."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | November 7, 1990
HANCOCK -- Walking along Sideling Hill Creek, Laurie MacIvor spots a tiny black slit on the brown silty bottom of the sparkling mountain stream.Most people wouldn't have seen it at all. But to MacIvor, a biologist with Maryland's Natural Heritage program, the dime-sized slit looked like the open mouth of a freshwater mussel buried in the mud.It turned out to be more than just another mussel. It was Lasmigona subviridis, also known as a "green floater." The inch-long bivalve is listed as endangered in Maryland, and it is rare enough nationwide to be nominated for federal protection.
NEWS
By Phillip Davis | November 13, 1990
An endangered flower, found in Maryland and just a handful of places in the rest of the world, will be protected under a new plan put together by environmentalists, the state government and the Boy Scouts of America.Sometime next month, the state will take possession of 1,196 acres of land belonging to the Boy Scouts in Western Maryland, where the rare flower harperella is found. The purchase was approved by the state Board of Public Works last week. The cost, about $800,000, will come from Project Open Space funds.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Staff Writer | July 29, 1992
HANCOCK -- The object of yesterday's First National Bank Cycle Across Maryland (CAM) was simple: Stay on the bike for the three major climbs.While tour organizers had warned cyclists about the 25-mile segment that climbed the peaks of Polish Mountain, Town Hill and Sideling Hill, most riders finished the course without stopping once for exhaustion during the climbs. The challenging course and a short day of cycling made for many satisfied participants, who streamed into Hancock before noon.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2014
Bonaventure von P. "Duke" Wachter, a retired State Highway Administration civil engineer who worked on numerous highway projects throughout Maryland, died May 23 of cancer at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. He was 69. "He was probably the best boss I've ever had in my life, and he was probably the best on-the-job-trained engineer that the State Highway Administration ever had," said Tony Smith, a former SHA civil engineer who lives in Nottingham. "Duke came up through the ranks.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1996
MARYLAND IS among the smallest of these United States (42nd in size) and more densely populated than all but five other states. In a word, it's crowded.But Daniel Boone knows better.Dan, no relation to the fabled pioneer, and a much better naturalist -- says it's all in how and where one looks at the state.Boone once drove from marshy, oystery Girdletree, on the southeastern corner of the Shore, to the strip-mined mountains of Kempton, in Garrett County's southwestern corner.It took eight hours -- drive north as long, and you'd be in Boston.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | February 12, 1995
HARVEY -- The Nature Conservancy of Maryland has bought 161 acres in the shadow of Sideling Hill -- where a highway cut is an unusual geological attraction for tourists -- to help protect one of the state's most pristine and least disturbed ecosystems.The tract, in the Sideling Hill Creek watershed in western Washington County, was bought from Thomas and Mary Creek, who will continue to live on another parcel not purchased by the nonprofit group, said Courtney Shepardson, a conservancy spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | November 13, 1994
EXLINE -- Babe Ruth came to these parts to hunt wild turkeys. So did radio's Amos and Andy. Boxer Gene Tunney came, too, and bagged a pheasant or two. And President Franklin D. Roosevelt -- not to mention five other presidents -- spent a lazy afternoon here fishing.They are among the many statesmen, athletes and entertainers, not to mention executives and others, who have hunted or fished among the wooded ridges and ravines of the 3,240-acre Woodmont Rod and Gun Club, a outdoorsman's paradise near Sideling Hill in mountainous western Washington County.
NEWS
September 14, 1993
WE LOVE the Nature Conservancy when it buys up some little piece of Maryland to hold harmless the habitat of some disappearing flora or fauna.The latest such effort, described in the Nature Conservancy of Maryland's fall newsletter, concerns the endangered harperella (Ptilimnium nodosum), a member of the carrot family that grows to less than two feet tall and has tiny white flowers resembling Queen Anne's lace.There's a drawing of Ptilimnium in the newsletter, and it looks for all the world like a carrot (well, like the carrot plant, not the edible root)
FEATURES
By Peter Honey | March 12, 1993
In Maryland, the Nature Conservancy has set a tentative target of spending $10 million over four years to protect four key Chesapeake watershed tributaries:* Nanticoke River, on the Eastern Shore, one of the most unsullied tributaries of the Chesapeake. Its watershed supports almost a third of the state's tidal wetlands, with extensive habitat for waterfowl and threatened plants and animals such as the bald eagle, seaside alder and Delmarva fox squirrel. Governor William Donald Schaefer has identified the river as one of the three priorities of the Chesapeake Bay program.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Staff Writer | July 29, 1992
HANCOCK -- The object of yesterday's First National Bank Cycle Across Maryland (CAM) was simple: Stay on the bike for the three major climbs.While tour organizers had warned cyclists about the 25-mile segment that climbed the peaks of Polish Mountain, Town Hill and Sideling Hill, most riders finished the course without stopping once for exhaustion during the climbs. The challenging course and a short day of cycling made for many satisfied participants, who streamed into Hancock before noon.
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 3, 1991
ROCKY GAP -- President Bush couldn't accept his invitation to the dedication of the nation's newest interstate yesterday in Western Maryland, so President Washington had to do.Washington arrived at the ceremonies overlooking Rocky Gap State Park early yesterday afternoon in a horse-drawn wagon and addressed several thousand people who came to celebrate the dedication of the new National Freeway, Interstate 68."I have traveled through many pages in history to be here today," said Washington, a.k.a.
FEATURES
By Peter Honey | March 12, 1993
In Maryland, the Nature Conservancy has set a tentative target of spending $10 million over four years to protect four key Chesapeake watershed tributaries:* Nanticoke River, on the Eastern Shore, one of the most unsullied tributaries of the Chesapeake. Its watershed supports almost a third of the state's tidal wetlands, with extensive habitat for waterfowl and threatened plants and animals such as the bald eagle, seaside alder and Delmarva fox squirrel. Governor William Donald Schaefer has identified the river as one of the three priorities of the Chesapeake Bay program.
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | August 3, 1991
ROCKY GAP -- President Bush couldn't accept his invitation to the dedication of the nation's newest interstate yesterday in Western Maryland, so President Washington had to do.Washington arrived at the ceremonies overlooking Rocky Gap State Park early yesterday afternoon in a horse-drawn wagon and addressed several thousand people who came to celebrate the dedication of the new National Freeway, Interstate 68."I have traveled through many pages in history to be here today," said Washington, a.k.a.
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | July 28, 1991
SIDELING HILL -- Maryland will be putting its rock collection on display in a big way on Washington County's Sideling Hill this week.On Friday, as part of the state's official designation ceremonies for Interstate 68, the Sideling Hill Visitors Center will open, a $5 million geological showstopper."
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