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By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | March 20, 1994
Q: The enclosed picture is of an oak sideboard that was given to me by my grandmother. There is a label on the back that says "Craftsman Workshop -- Eastwood, New York -- Gustav Stickley -- New York Show Room -- 29 West Thirty Fourth Street."I would like to know anything you could tell me about my sideboard. Is there a book about antique furniture of this type that you could recommend?A: Gustav Stickley was one of the leaders of the arts and crafts movement that began in the late 1890s. He formed a guild-type furniture shop in 1899 that was the forerunner of his Craftsman Workshops.
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By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | February 25, 2011
Aunt Tilly finally decided to give you that old dining room set you always loved, but countless family get-togethers have taken their toll. Or maybe you spotted a great antique credenza at a secondhand store, and its worn-out, scratched finish has you thinking twice. There are many reasons for refinishing older and antique furnishings. Whatever they are, there's no doubt refinishing or restoration can be an environmentally friendly and economical way to give older tables, chairs, chests and sideboards a new lease on life.
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By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | August 3, 1997
Sideboards, common pieces of dining-room furniture, have been made since the 16th century. They are long tables, often with drawers and cupboards beneath, used to hold food and dishes.The style changed from the heavy oak carved style popular before 1700 to the trim, inlay-decorated style of Sheraton in the early 1800s.Then came the large carved sideboards of the 1880s. Styles continued to change, and by the 1920s the sideboard was made in a sleek, modern style.Each type of sideboard was made to be useful.
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By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | August 3, 1997
Sideboards, common pieces of dining-room furniture, have been made since the 16th century. They are long tables, often with drawers and cupboards beneath, used to hold food and dishes.The style changed from the heavy oak carved style popular before 1700 to the trim, inlay-decorated style of Sheraton in the early 1800s.Then came the large carved sideboards of the 1880s. Styles continued to change, and by the 1920s the sideboard was made in a sleek, modern style.Each type of sideboard was made to be useful.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | March 16, 1997
I've long wanted to add a serving bar to my living room. What's held me back until now is the room's 18th-century furnishing style, which has always seemed to call for something more than the usual mirrored alcove with shelves. Can you help me come up with a suitable alternative?Whether you'll find my main suggestion acceptable will partly depend on your willingness to have a bar that makes do without refrigeration and running water. If that's OK with you, perhaps you'll find my advice appealing.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 23, 1992
Q: I want to give my dining room the elegant look produced by formal English or American period furniture. The room isn't large, but it does have a 10-foot ceiling. In addition to the table and chairs, should I purchase a sideboard or a breakfront? I'd also like your advice on decorations.A: The best way to start such a project is by looking at examples of period room settings. American and English dining rooms of the 18th and 19th centuries are depicted in many books that cover the history of interior design.
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By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home + Living | February 25, 2011
Aunt Tilly finally decided to give you that old dining room set you always loved, but countless family get-togethers have taken their toll. Or maybe you spotted a great antique credenza at a secondhand store, and its worn-out, scratched finish has you thinking twice. There are many reasons for refinishing older and antique furnishings. Whatever they are, there's no doubt refinishing or restoration can be an environmentally friendly and economical way to give older tables, chairs, chests and sideboards a new lease on life.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | February 27, 1994
Q: Enclosed is a picture of a platter, light blue and white, given to me 20 years ago by an elderly lady. It is 18 by 14 inches, with "View of Newburgh," and "Jackson Warranted" in a scroll on the back.What can you tell me about my platter?A: Your platter was made by Churchyard Works, operated by Job and John Jackson in Burslem, Staffordshire, England, between 1831 and 1843. It is a historic view of Newburgh, N.Y., along the Hudson River.Most of the Staffordshire potters had a border by which they could be identified.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | February 5, 1998
This sideboard, only 6 inches high, is an example of the craftsmanship of furniture maker Enrico Liberti, active in Baltimore in the middle of the century. In addition to full-size furniture, Liberti made miniature pieces with dovetails no bigger than a pin and inlay almost as thin as a human hair. Liberti's work is included in the exhibit "Small, Smaller, Smallest: Adults' Delights, Children's Enchantments," a show of about 100 pieces of miniature furniture on view at Homewood House Museum.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 1997
The Ann Arrundell County Historical Society tried something different this year when gussying up its Benson-Hammond House, at Aviation Boulevard and Andover Road, for the annual Candlelight Christmas Tour.The 19th-century farmhouse, which will be open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. today through Saturday, remains decorated after last weekend's tour. The work of six area florists is on display on the porch and in each room.Beth Nowell, president of the historical society, said each florist was asked to decorate a room or area of the house to show visitors how a Christmas arrangement works in a house.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | March 16, 1997
I've long wanted to add a serving bar to my living room. What's held me back until now is the room's 18th-century furnishing style, which has always seemed to call for something more than the usual mirrored alcove with shelves. Can you help me come up with a suitable alternative?Whether you'll find my main suggestion acceptable will partly depend on your willingness to have a bar that makes do without refrigeration and running water. If that's OK with you, perhaps you'll find my advice appealing.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | March 20, 1994
Q: The enclosed picture is of an oak sideboard that was given to me by my grandmother. There is a label on the back that says "Craftsman Workshop -- Eastwood, New York -- Gustav Stickley -- New York Show Room -- 29 West Thirty Fourth Street."I would like to know anything you could tell me about my sideboard. Is there a book about antique furniture of this type that you could recommend?A: Gustav Stickley was one of the leaders of the arts and crafts movement that began in the late 1890s. He formed a guild-type furniture shop in 1899 that was the forerunner of his Craftsman Workshops.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 23, 1992
Q: I want to give my dining room the elegant look produced by formal English or American period furniture. The room isn't large, but it does have a 10-foot ceiling. In addition to the table and chairs, should I purchase a sideboard or a breakfront? I'd also like your advice on decorations.A: The best way to start such a project is by looking at examples of period room settings. American and English dining rooms of the 18th and 19th centuries are depicted in many books that cover the history of interior design.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,special to the Sun | December 16, 2007
Wreath and Basket.com charmed a panel of judges in the Ellicott City window-decorating contest this year with snow, greenery and wooden Nutcracker characters based on the well-loved ballet. The store was named the first-place winner among 16 entrants in Ellicott City's historic district. This was the second such contest organized by the Ellicott City Restoration Foundation Inc. Judges from Howard County Tourism and Patuxent Publishing - both of which provided prizes - joined County Council Chairman Courtney Watson in choosing the winner this month.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
Flowers by designPeople have walked into Andrea Stieff's new studio, seen a thousand flowers there, and been amazed that none is for sale. "I tell them they're already spoken-for," she says with a laugh.She's not a florist, but one of the area's premier floral designers. Her specialty is important events. From high-end weddings to the Maryland Historical Society's antiques show to a home decorated for a spread in Southern Accents, Stieff has done them all.Andrea Stieff Designs is open by appointment only; call (410)
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