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NEWS
By Dan Berger | April 7, 1999
Cheer up. The General Assembly has passed legislation making Hillary Clinton eligible to become mayor of Baltimore. Now all she need do is take up residence.The news biz did not know what could replace Monica. Slobodan came to the rescue.The West Side of downtown is coming back. From where and to where will be addressed at a later date.OK, Belle can stay.
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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | December 31, 2009
A commercial fixture on downtown Baltimore's west side is getting a makeover in 2010. The Lexaco Building at 501 W. Lexington St., longtime home of an appliance and furniture store, is being acquired by America's Realty, a rapidly growing, Pikesville-based shopping center developer. Carl Verstandig, president and chief executive officer of the company, said he has a contract to buy the three-story building for $650,000 and plans to spend $250,000 to $300,000 to restore its exterior and reconfigure its interior to create two retail spaces, including one for Lexaco.
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NEWS
June 17, 1999
WHAT EXACTLY would be preserved if the city's ambitious west-side development came to a halt? Would Baltimore be better off if these half-vacant stores and offices were left intact?That seems to be the curious position of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, which has placed the west side of downtown on its list of "America's 11 Most Endangered Historic Places."It is a classic case of a well-intended but misguided effort to keep historically important buildings from being torn down.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun Reporter | July 26, 2008
By choosing to build a new arena on the west side of downtown, Baltimore is placing a $300 million bet on an area that has long struggled to come to life. One problem has been 1st Mariner Arena itself, a 46-year-old albatross with only one entrance and no street-level retail outlets - a hulk that stifles the blocks around it. Proponents of a new downtown arena call the project a shot in the arm for the west side, while critics said yesterday that a mega-project is a bad fit for that area.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1998
They've studied the east side of downtown. They've studied the west side of downtown. Now the urban experts are turning their attention to the area in between.Seeking new ways to stimulate development in the heart of the city, the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore has launched a $180,000 effort to outline a strategic plan for the central business district, anchored by award-winning Charles Center.The nonprofit group, which works to create a "cleaner, more prosperous and vibrant downtown," has hired Hammer Siler George and Associates of Silver Spring to complete an economic analysis of the central business district and Design Collective of Baltimore to prepare a plan to guide physical development there.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | November 12, 1994
A New Jersey chain of children's clothing and furniture stores will take over part of the closed Epstein's department store at the Lexington Mall in downtown Baltimore, a spokesman for the Young World chain said yesterday.The chain opened stores at Catonsville Plaza and Reisterstown Road Plaza in Baltimore within the past few weeks, said spokesman Lenny Schweitzer. He said the Bayonne-based chain plans to expand further in Baltimore next year.Mr. Schweitzer said the store, to open this month, will take over the basement and the first floor of the five-level Epstein's building.
NEWS
By Bill Pencek and Tyler Gearhart | February 19, 1999
THIS is an exciting time for those of us who believe the conditions are finally right for the revitalization of the west side of downtown Baltimore. But as H. L. Mencken wrote, "For every complex, difficult problem, there is a simple, easy solution, and it is wrong."Revitalizing the west side of downtown is a complex challenge that must include a detailed program for restoring historic buildings -- not just a few silver bullet projects or a plan that is short on specifics.Of the details released so far on the west side plan, it appears that little attention has been paid to historic preservation.
BUSINESS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2000
Baltimore's development agency has received five proposals to build apartments and shops in the 400 block of N. Howard St. as part of the city's efforts to rejuvenate the west side of downtown. The Baltimore Development Corp. will evaluate the proposals over the next several weeks and recommend one to Mayor Martin O'Malley by the end of November, said Sharon Grinnell, chief operating officer for the city development agency. The large number of responses to the agency's June request for proposals in the area illustrates the strong interest in the city's project to rebuild the struggling west side of downtown, said M. J. "Jay" Brodie, president of the agency.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1999
Twenty-four merchants threatened with eviction by a proposal to build hundreds of apartments on the west side of downtown Baltimore held a quiet rally yesterday to protest their displacement.Holding signs reading "West Side Merchants Deserve Better," the shopkeepers stood silently at Lexington Street and Park Avenue, near where workers are expected to start demolishing buildings in the spring."I've been here 24 years, and now I'm afraid I will have to close. I feel so sick about this whole thing, I don't know what to do," said Young Cho, owner of Wig House Beauty Salon at 112 W. Lexington St.As part of an effort to rebuild and rejuvenate several blocks on the struggling west side of downtown, the city's development agency is offering to buy dozens of stores and threatening to condemn and seize buildings if the owners refuse.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2001
In a major victory for preservationists seeking to save threatened buildings on the west side of downtown, Mayor Martin O'Malley signed an agreement yesterday to preserve at least 260 buildings in an area targeted for condemnation. The move means that more than half of the buildings in a 26-block zone surrounding Howard Street must be renovated instead of demolished as part of the city's $350 million effort to rebuild the struggling retail district. The action represents a significant shift in focus for the project, which is the city's largest urban renewal effort since the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | March 26, 2008
Long before Baltimore had its Harborplace pavilions, or the National Aquarium, or Oriole Park, there was Charles Center. The 33-acre district in the heart of downtown might not be as well known as some of the newer spots, and tourists don't typically seek it out. But it is as significant as any other development associated with modern-day Baltimore because, in many ways, it was the catalyst for all that followed, including the even more ambitious effort...
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | July 31, 2007
The old Stewart's department store downtown never contained a chapel for weekday Mass. Or a meditation space for Muslims. Or an upper-level "situation room" to cope with tsunamis and other disasters. Those are just a few of the additions made to the structure built in 1899, which reopens today after a $42.7 million conversion to become the new world headquarters of Catholic Relief Services, the international relief and development agency of the U. S. Roman Catholic community. The move ends nearly three decades of uncertainty about the fate of the Stewart's building, once one of the jewels of a bustling shopping district that drew thousands to the west side of downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 15, 2006
I was on a walking mission for pecan nougat Easter eggs this week when I turned west off Charles Street at Lexington. Even though I had read several articles about plans for a new look for Center Plaza, I was not ready for what I saw: Construction crews were sawing the trees that lined this 1960s square, and bulldozers were crunching paving stones. Yikes, here we go again! I am just old enough to have known and enjoyed the part of Baltimore that existed before the Charles Center and the modernist urban renewal doctrine was imposed on this part of town.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
THE HIPPODROME Theatre, which has its grand opening Tuesday night, is not nearly as big -- nor expensive -- as Oriole Park at Camden Yards or M&T Bank Stadium. And it may not be featured on the cover of Time magazine, the way Harborplace was, or become a beacon in aerial pictures of Baltimore, like the National Aquarium. But among major public buildings in the city that have opened during the past quarter-century, the Hippodrome stands out for the way it blends historic preservation, civic and cultural attraction, and hoped-for community revitalization.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2004
John Cavey is the type of guy the Hippodrome Theatre's management hopes to attract. The 56-year-old industrial salesman from Baltimore County occasionally attends plays in the city and wants to see the theater's $62 million overhaul. But old perceptions about downtown Baltimore's west side leave him a little uneasy. After all, Cavey still remembers when his car was broken into near the theater - in 1969. Yet he is willing to give the area another chance. "I would probably frequent the place as long as there wasn't a safety problem," he said recently from his home in Parkville.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
The recent flare-up between Mayor Martin O'Malley and those who say he doesn't concentrate enough resources on rebuilding the west side of downtown highlights a broader issue: His urban renewal strategies differ significantly from those of his predecessors. O'Malley, as a white leader in a majority-black city, works hard to avoid being perceived as downtown's mayor and a champion of big business interests. Instead, he emphasizes his efforts to boost minority enterprises and lift neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1998
The cost of renovating Baltimore's Hippodrome Theater and its surrounding area may be rising beyond original projections, prompting some members of the General Assembly to question the wisdom of investing any state funds in the project.During a tour last week, members of the House Appropriations Committee were told that the cost of converting the vacant vaudeville house at 12 N. Eutaw St. to a 2,200-seat performing arts center could exceed the originally estimated figure of $35 million by anywhere from $2 million to $25 million.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | May 31, 2001
UP HERE, ON the roof of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, on the west side of downtown Baltimore, you can see pretty far. On a clear day, you can see all the way to the 2000 block of E. North Ave., where a dozen people were shot the other night. Some of them wound up at Shock Trauma. At moments like this, the bodies seem to arrive from some other city altogether. Thus the battle for Baltimore's future is joined once again. All around University of Maryland Medical Center, the west side of downtown blooms with possibilities.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | May 31, 2001
UP HERE, ON the roof of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, on the west side of downtown Baltimore, you can see pretty far. On a clear day, you can see all the way to the 2000 block of E. North Ave., where a dozen people were shot the other night. Some of them wound up at Shock Trauma. At moments like this, the bodies seem to arrive from some other city altogether. Thus the battle for Baltimore's future is joined once again. All around University of Maryland Medical Center, the west side of downtown blooms with possibilities.
TOPIC
By Tyler Gearhart | April 22, 2001
In the past several months, long-running disputes over the proposed demolition of the west side of downtown Baltimore, Redwood Street, and Memorial Stadium have been resolved. A significant part of the west side will be preserved, while a significant part of the 100 block of E. Redwood St. is being torn down. The stadium will soon be gone, but its 116-foot memorial facade will be preserved. Now that the dust has -- or will soon be -- settled, the question remains, why fight for historic buildings?
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