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Sickle Cell Disease

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EXPLORE
February 10, 2012
The Sickle Cell Disease Association of Harford and Cecil Counties, The William E. Proudford Sickle Cell Fund, IHomes and Maryland Sickle Cell Disease Association hosted a Legislative Day in Annapolis on Feb. 1. Representing the Harford/Cecil County Sickle Cell Association were Betty Johnson, Denise Williams, Rudy Williams and Bobby Parker. Karen Proudford, President of the William E. Proudford Sickle Cell Fund, Inc., was the event organizer. The purpose of the day in Annapolis was to educate legislators about the disease and to solicit their support for resources for adults living with sickle cell disease.
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NEWS
July 12, 2013
I was pleased to read your coverage of the suffering endured by patients living with sickle cell disease ("As a sufferer, researcher and advocate, Johns Hopkins' Carlton Haywood has been battling the 'orphan disease' sickle cell all his life," July 7). The report noted that sickle cell disease research is tragically underfunded in Maryland. The only known cure for SCD involves adult stem cells, either from a bone marrow or from an umbilical cord blood transplant. Dr. Javier Bolanos Meade, at Johns Hopkins, is doing research to expand the pool of bone marrow donors so that more patients can find a match.
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NEWS
July 12, 2013
I was pleased to read your coverage of the suffering endured by patients living with sickle cell disease ("As a sufferer, researcher and advocate, Johns Hopkins' Carlton Haywood has been battling the 'orphan disease' sickle cell all his life," July 7). The report noted that sickle cell disease research is tragically underfunded in Maryland. The only known cure for SCD involves adult stem cells, either from a bone marrow or from an umbilical cord blood transplant. Dr. Javier Bolanos Meade, at Johns Hopkins, is doing research to expand the pool of bone marrow donors so that more patients can find a match.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Sharon Johnson is not a physician or scientific researcher. She has never been trained as a nurse. Her most recent prior occupation was as office manager in a dental practice. Yet colleagues say she's a bundle of compassion, a quick study and a genius at communicating with people of all backgrounds — all qualities that have made her a key player in iHOMES, a Johns Hopkins-based network of health care providers who are dedicated to mobilizing every possible resource in the fight against sickle cell disease.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Preliminary tests suggest that a potential treatment for sickle cell disease and related blood disorders could attack the underlying cause of the illnesses for the first time, say researchers.In a small group of patients, they said yesterday, treatment with a naturally occurring chemical stimulated production of a kind of hemoglobin in the blood that is known to benefit people with sickle cell disease or beta thalassemia, which are related inherited anemias.But they said longer studies with more patients were needed to see whether the treatment produced the expected clinical benefit.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Bill Ordine and Lem Satterfield and Bill Ordine,Sun reporters | November 5, 2006
Lester Gregory, slender and serious, sat expressionless on a hospital gurney, two long tubes extending into each of the 15-year-old's lean arms. Where a needle pierced the soft inside of his right elbow, fresh whole blood coursed into Gregory's veins - oxygen-rich blood that would stave off anemia and invigorate him. From his left arm, clumpy, sickle-celled blood flowed into a large bag to be discarded.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | December 1, 1992
Q: I know that young babies and the elderly should get a flu shot, but I wonder whether I should get one for my 14-year-old son. He has asthma.A: Flu shots are not just for little children and the elderly. Your son is a perfect example of the kind of teen-ager who would also benefit from this immunization. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends the influenza vaccine for any adolescent with chronic pulmonary disease (like asthma or cystic fibrosis), significant heart disease, sickle cell disease or who is receiving immunosuppressive therapy.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | January 23, 2006
Dr. Samuel Huntington "Ned" Boyer IV, a retired Johns Hopkins research scientist who did early genetic studies and was later active in liberal Democratic Party circles, died Saturday of complications after surgery related to lung cancer. The Ruxton resident, who was 81, died at St. Joseph Medical Center. Dr. Boyer's initial studies, made nearly 35 years ago, provided the basis for breakthrough therapies for blood disorders such as sickle cell disease, his colleagues said yesterday. He was also the last editor of The Johns Hopkins Medical Journal, which ceased publication in 1982.
NEWS
February 25, 2001
Marie B. Schlueter, 72, mathematics teacher Marie B. Schlueter, a retired high school mathematics teacher, died Feb. 17 of multiple organ failure at Good Samaritan Hospital in Baltimore. She was 72 and lived in Bel Air. Mrs. Schlueter taught math in Baltimore County public schools for 16 years. "She enjoyed challeng- ing students," said her daughter, Lisa Benefield, of Hollywood, Md. "They may not have liked it while they were going through it, but many later came back to thank her for that."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | March 30, 2008
Fifteen months ago, the pain from Pamela Newton's sickle cell disease was excruciating. She spent more time in the hospital than in her Capitol Heights apartment. She was on 15 pain pills a day, all heavy narcotics. She was bleeding regularly and needed daily transfusions of platelets. She had just months to live. Today, doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital say that Newton is one of the first adults in the world to be cured of sickle cell disease - and the first using an experimental bone marrow transplant that could cure thousands like her who have been told they will never get better.
EXPLORE
February 10, 2012
The Sickle Cell Disease Association of Harford and Cecil Counties, The William E. Proudford Sickle Cell Fund, IHomes and Maryland Sickle Cell Disease Association hosted a Legislative Day in Annapolis on Feb. 1. Representing the Harford/Cecil County Sickle Cell Association were Betty Johnson, Denise Williams, Rudy Williams and Bobby Parker. Karen Proudford, President of the William E. Proudford Sickle Cell Fund, Inc., was the event organizer. The purpose of the day in Annapolis was to educate legislators about the disease and to solicit their support for resources for adults living with sickle cell disease.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | March 30, 2008
Fifteen months ago, the pain from Pamela Newton's sickle cell disease was excruciating. She spent more time in the hospital than in her Capitol Heights apartment. She was on 15 pain pills a day, all heavy narcotics. She was bleeding regularly and needed daily transfusions of platelets. She had just months to live. Today, doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital say that Newton is one of the first adults in the world to be cured of sickle cell disease - and the first using an experimental bone marrow transplant that could cure thousands like her who have been told they will never get better.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Bill Ordine and Lem Satterfield and Bill Ordine,Sun reporters | November 5, 2006
Lester Gregory, slender and serious, sat expressionless on a hospital gurney, two long tubes extending into each of the 15-year-old's lean arms. Where a needle pierced the soft inside of his right elbow, fresh whole blood coursed into Gregory's veins - oxygen-rich blood that would stave off anemia and invigorate him. From his left arm, clumpy, sickle-celled blood flowed into a large bag to be discarded.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | January 23, 2006
Dr. Samuel Huntington "Ned" Boyer IV, a retired Johns Hopkins research scientist who did early genetic studies and was later active in liberal Democratic Party circles, died Saturday of complications after surgery related to lung cancer. The Ruxton resident, who was 81, died at St. Joseph Medical Center. Dr. Boyer's initial studies, made nearly 35 years ago, provided the basis for breakthrough therapies for blood disorders such as sickle cell disease, his colleagues said yesterday. He was also the last editor of The Johns Hopkins Medical Journal, which ceased publication in 1982.
NEWS
February 25, 2001
Marie B. Schlueter, 72, mathematics teacher Marie B. Schlueter, a retired high school mathematics teacher, died Feb. 17 of multiple organ failure at Good Samaritan Hospital in Baltimore. She was 72 and lived in Bel Air. Mrs. Schlueter taught math in Baltimore County public schools for 16 years. "She enjoyed challeng- ing students," said her daughter, Lisa Benefield, of Hollywood, Md. "They may not have liked it while they were going through it, but many later came back to thank her for that."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Preliminary tests suggest that a potential treatment for sickle cell disease and related blood disorders could attack the underlying cause of the illnesses for the first time, say researchers.In a small group of patients, they said yesterday, treatment with a naturally occurring chemical stimulated production of a kind of hemoglobin in the blood that is known to benefit people with sickle cell disease or beta thalassemia, which are related inherited anemias.But they said longer studies with more patients were needed to see whether the treatment produced the expected clinical benefit.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Sharon Johnson is not a physician or scientific researcher. She has never been trained as a nurse. Her most recent prior occupation was as office manager in a dental practice. Yet colleagues say she's a bundle of compassion, a quick study and a genius at communicating with people of all backgrounds — all qualities that have made her a key player in iHOMES, a Johns Hopkins-based network of health care providers who are dedicated to mobilizing every possible resource in the fight against sickle cell disease.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 19, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A major international study has found that regular blood transfusions prevent the vast majority of strokes in children with sickle cell disease, doctors said yesterday.Researchers said they ended the study 16 months early because preliminary results showed that the treatment reduced the risk of stroke by 90 percent in young patients at high risk for the $H debilitating complication, and it would be wrong to limit the therapy to just some patients in the study.Stroke is a frequent complication among children with sickle cell disease.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | December 1, 1992
Q: I know that young babies and the elderly should get a flu shot, but I wonder whether I should get one for my 14-year-old son. He has asthma.A: Flu shots are not just for little children and the elderly. Your son is a perfect example of the kind of teen-ager who would also benefit from this immunization. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends the influenza vaccine for any adolescent with chronic pulmonary disease (like asthma or cystic fibrosis), significant heart disease, sickle cell disease or who is receiving immunosuppressive therapy.
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