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HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Sharon Johnson is not a physician or scientific researcher. She has never been trained as a nurse. Her most recent prior occupation was as office manager in a dental practice. Yet colleagues say she's a bundle of compassion, a quick study and a genius at communicating with people of all backgrounds — all qualities that have made her a key player in iHOMES, a Johns Hopkins-based network of health care providers who are dedicated to mobilizing every possible resource in the fight against sickle cell disease.
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NEWS
July 12, 2013
I was pleased to read your coverage of the suffering endured by patients living with sickle cell disease ("As a sufferer, researcher and advocate, Johns Hopkins' Carlton Haywood has been battling the 'orphan disease' sickle cell all his life," July 7). The report noted that sickle cell disease research is tragically underfunded in Maryland. The only known cure for SCD involves adult stem cells, either from a bone marrow or from an umbilical cord blood transplant. Dr. Javier Bolanos Meade, at Johns Hopkins, is doing research to expand the pool of bone marrow donors so that more patients can find a match.
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NEWS
April 28, 1991
The annual walk-a-thon to raise funds for research to cure sickle cell anemia will take place Sunday, May 19.Registration for the 30-kilometer walk will begin at 7 a.m. at Hillsdale Elementary School, Edmund Street, in Aberdeen.Participants will solicit pledges for each kilometer completed.This year's poster child is Calvin Carter, 2. His favorite food is spaghetti, says his mother, Spec. Caroline Showell, of the Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground.Calvin is a victim of ablood disease for which there has yet to be found a cure.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
The tall, lanky patient enters the room bent over and shuffling like a man twice his age. He climbs on a gurney and lies back, head throbbing. Then Carlton Haywood pulls out a bottle of Tums, relief-in-waiting for the nausea he fears will come. "You never know how bad it's going to get," he says with a cordial smile. Haywood, 37, belongs to the 0.003 percent of the U.S. population that suffers from sickle cell disease, which predominantly affects blacks and which he has battled since birth.
NEWS
February 2, 1995
Until this week, medical science held out little hope for victims of sickle cell anemia, an inherited blood disorder that causes organ damage, episodes of extreme pain and premature death. The announcement Monday that researchers at the Johns Hopkins University Medical School have developed the first effective treatment for severe forms of the illness means that sickle cell may one day become a manageable, chronic illness rather than the relentless killer it is today.Between 70,000 and 80,000 people in the United States suffer from the disease.
FEATURES
August 13, 1991
CURRENT volunteers' news and needs:Sickle Cell Association, Maryland Chapter volunteers and staff are holding a walk-a-thon on Sept. 15. Walkers and runners are invited. A mini-walk will also be held. For sponsor sheets and complete details, call 837-3050.BOur Daily Bread, a soup kitchen at 200 W. Franklin St., is looking for volunteers. The kitchen also is holding a workshop on the homeless at 2:30 p.m. Saturday. For information call, 539-2744.Parents Anonymous will hold training for facilitators and "stress-line" volunteers from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Sept.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2009
With a James Bond party theme, it was no wonder the Hyatt Regency ballroom looked like a movie set. The room was swagged in white chiffon, with clusters of white couches and cube tables along the sides. Red velvet ropes cordoned off the back third of the room, which was elevated for the VIP section. "There's a bottle of vodka on every table here," said real estate developer Patrick Turner, noting the VIP bottle service. No set would be complete without its stars. And there were plenty, thanks to host Baltimore Ravens player Terrell Suggs.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff Writer | February 6, 1995
Only Dr. Samuel Charache knows precisely where to place the needle. He can't put it in the arms of his sickle cell patients. Long ago, their veins collapsed, punctured too many times.To draw blood from John Paul, Dr. Charache deftly locates the place on the man's right index finger -- on the knuckle. To draw blood from William Thorn Jr., the doctor pierces the outside of his thumb.Dr. Charache, 65, knows these two patients almost as well as family. Out of this close relationship -- 28 years in Mr. Paul's case -- has grown a research effort that culminated last week in the announcement of an effective treatment for severe sickle cell anemia.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff | December 22, 1995
As a crowd of proud and tearful relatives looked on, Johns Hopkins physicians unveiled a bronze plaque yesterday dedicated to the memory of a Baltimore sickle cell patient who was willing to try any drug, risk any side effect, to further sickle cell anemia research.John L. Paul Jr., 42, known as "Dean" by the many who lovedhim, died in July after enduring years of the disease's terrible pain and crippling side effects.It was Mr. Paul's partnership with Dr. Samuel Charache during 28 years that led to the discovery this year of the first effective treatment for sickle cell, the drug hydroxyurea.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | December 13, 1998
ATLANTA -- Medical history unfolded at Egleston Children's Hospital on Friday at noon with the world's first umbilical cord blood transplant for sickle cell anemia.As a syringe of dark red blood plunged into the intravenous line of Keone Penn, relatives and friends bowed their heads in prayer and talked of miracles, cures and gratitude.They also gently told the center of attention to wake up."Hey, Keone. God's working it out just like we said. Wake up and see your miracle happening," said Beverly Kennedy, a close friend of Leslie Penn, Keone's mother.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Sharon Johnson is not a physician or scientific researcher. She has never been trained as a nurse. Her most recent prior occupation was as office manager in a dental practice. Yet colleagues say she's a bundle of compassion, a quick study and a genius at communicating with people of all backgrounds — all qualities that have made her a key player in iHOMES, a Johns Hopkins-based network of health care providers who are dedicated to mobilizing every possible resource in the fight against sickle cell disease.
HEALTH
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Halfway around the world in India, Sivaprakash Ramalingam had heard of Johns Hopkins researchers using a promising new technique for gene therapy that he hoped to integrate with stem cells to cure diseases. After getting a doctorate in biochemistry in his native country, he came to Baltimore four years ago to study under the technique's pioneer, Srinivasan Chandrasegaran, at Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health. Ramalingam's research has led him down the path of seeking a cure for sickle cell anemia, a painful, life-shortening blood disorder that afflicts many in his home region in southern India.
EXPLORE
February 10, 2012
The Sickle Cell Disease Association of Harford and Cecil Counties, The William E. Proudford Sickle Cell Fund, IHomes and Maryland Sickle Cell Disease Association hosted a Legislative Day in Annapolis on Feb. 1. Representing the Harford/Cecil County Sickle Cell Association were Betty Johnson, Denise Williams, Rudy Williams and Bobby Parker. Karen Proudford, President of the William E. Proudford Sickle Cell Fund, Inc., was the event organizer. The purpose of the day in Annapolis was to educate legislators about the disease and to solicit their support for resources for adults living with sickle cell disease.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 5, 2012
The last time Pittsburgh Steelers leading tackler Ryan Clark played a game in Denver, he ended up in a hospital having his spleen and gallbladder removed. Since then Clark, who suffers from the sickle cell trait, hasn't played when the team travels to the high-altitude, midwestern state. He will miss his team's playoff game there Sunday as well. The sickle cell trait causes some of the body's red blood cells to change shape and harden, making it hard to carry oxygen throughout the body, said Sophie Lanzkron , a Johns Hopkins associate professor and director of the Sickle Cell Center for Adults at Hopkins.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | October 15, 2009
WASHINGTON - -An analysis in 10 states of people hospitalized with the pandemic strain of H1N1 influenza shows that asthma is by far the most common underlying condition associated with severe cases of the disease. In children, other much rarer chronic conditions, such as sickle cell anemia, cerebral palsy and muscular dystrophy, are also predisposing patients to life-threatening bouts of the virus, federal health officials said. Epidemiologists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention studied the experience of about 1,400 people older than 18, and 500 children, who had been hospitalized in 10 states since the new influenza strain emerged in April.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2009
With a James Bond party theme, it was no wonder the Hyatt Regency ballroom looked like a movie set. The room was swagged in white chiffon, with clusters of white couches and cube tables along the sides. Red velvet ropes cordoned off the back third of the room, which was elevated for the VIP section. "There's a bottle of vodka on every table here," said real estate developer Patrick Turner, noting the VIP bottle service. No set would be complete without its stars. And there were plenty, thanks to host Baltimore Ravens player Terrell Suggs.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Researchers have discovered that a drug being examined as a cancer therapy may also turn out to be a non-toxic treatment for sickle cell anemia and related blood disorders.Scientists at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and the National Cancer Institute said yesterday that the drug, which is commonly used for rare metabolic disorders in children, has been found to increase production of a fetal type of hemoglobin that is beneficial to sickle cell patients.The researchers said they know of no other drug that produces such a high level of fetal hemoglobin, and they are excited about its potential for treating patients who suffer from inherited anemias.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | September 29, 1992
Baltimore junior middleweight title contender Vincent Pettway is fighting for charity these days.On Thursday, Pettway (35-4), ranked No. 2 by the International Boxing Federation, will battle Aaron Smith (10-10-1), of Gaithersburg, at the Pikesville Armory, with profits from the six-bout card going to the Baltimore chapter of the National Association for Sickle Cell Disease.Pettway, 26, gives more than lip service in trying to raise money for the incurable disease that affects mostly African Americans.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2008
At the post-show party for the 51st Annual Ebony Fashion Fair , held at Morgan State University's Murphy Fine Arts Center, it became apparent that it wasn't just the show that has a proud history. When the Baltimore Alumnae Chapter of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. began hosting the touring fashion show more than 50 years ago, the chapter already had a 44-year jump on it. And for many of the party's guests, the history of both was a personal one. "It's awesome. I've been coming since I was in the fifth grade.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,Sun reporter | March 30, 2008
"I challenge you to find any one of my patients who has not been treated like a drug addict," says Dr. Sophie Lanzkron, director of the Sickle Cell Center for Adults at Johns Hopkins. "There are only so many times you can listen to those stories before you have to do something about it." So she did. In February, Hopkins opened a day hospital for sickle cell patients who need immediate pain medication when they feel overwhelming crises coming on. The staff knows their needs and treats them gently - often better than the suspicious staffs of emergency rooms.
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