Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSick Leave
IN THE NEWS

Sick Leave

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 9, 2013
Mandatory paid sick leave isn't the cure-all that op-ed writer Paul Kinzie makes it out to be. ("Paid sick leave for food workers makes us all healthier," August 7). There's a growing body of evidence that shows that these laws actually hurt the employees they're intended to help. For instance, a study by the Institute for Women's Policy Research - a group supportive of paid sick leave laws - found that nearly 30 percent of San Francisco's lowest-wage employees reported layoffs or reduced hours at their place of work following that city's passage of a paid leave mandate.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jolene Ivey | December 9, 2013
Consider this scenario: A single mom's baby wakes up with a fever. She can either give him a dose of Tylenol, hoping it brings the baby's temperature down long enough to make it through her shift as a waitress, or stay home and miss a whole day's pay and not be able to afford rent or day care next week. She chooses the Tylenol, feeling guilty about it. Her son infects several other children at the day care, which sends him home. His mom has to miss work to care for him, then gets sick herself.
Advertisement
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Thomas W. Waldron, Frank Langfitt and John A. Morris contributed to this article | February 2, 1995
Three top aides to Gov. Parris N. Glendening voluntarily gave up more than $100,000 in unused sick leave payments yesterday in another effort to staunch the political bleeding over lucrative benefits they and Mr. Glendening received upon leaving the Prince George's County government.It marked the second time this week that members of the new administration -- including the governor himself -- have been prompted by adverse publicity to give back thousands of dollars in benefits."I can't take these hits on my credibility," said Glendening chief of staff Major F. Riddick Jr., who gave up $59,075 of unused sick leave.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2013
Former Anne Arundel County Superintendent Kevin Maxwell, who left earlier this month for a similar position in Prince George's County, received on Wednesday a $90,060 payout for unused leave time, Anne Arundel school officials said. Maxwell formally resigned from Anne Arundel County schools in June to become chief executive officer of schools in Prince George's. Maxwell took over at Prince George's on Aug. 1; he will earn $290,000 annually. His contract in Anne Arundel paid him $257,000 a year.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
Tom Jones never thought he'd have to leave his job with Harford County at this point in his life. But then the 56-year-old Public Works employee never expected to suffer a stroke.He's just glad that when misfortune struck, he had the support of his fellow workers.That support blossomed this summer when members of the county Highways Maintenance Division learned that Mr. Jones was permanently disabled by the stroke and wouldn't be able to return to his job.They pooled their personal sick leave and donated nearly 400 hours of leave to keep him on the county payroll until he becomes eligible for other financial assistance.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 7, 2005
BOSTON - Not long ago, a young actor I know was doing a gig as a waiter. Faced with a truly obnoxious customer, he finally leaned over the table and said theatrically, "Sir, do you realize that I'm going to be spending time alone with your dinner?" This was a memorable moment in the annals of sick humor. But this winter, many of the people spending time alone with your dinner - or huddling around your desk - are just plain sick. A particularly nasty little virus has taken down two members of my family, and brought Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton to the floor in the middle of a speech.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2001
Responding to an audit that showed a handful of police officers had abused sick leave shortly before retiring, Anne Arundel County police officials said yesterday that they were trying to determine how to enforce leave policies more consistently. "We have the policies in place," said Deputy Police Chief David G. Shipley. "We just have to make sure they're followed. Training could be a part of that." Shipley said the department also might consider adding checks and balances so that supervisors can spot potential abuses more easily.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1996
Baltimore's police commissioner, upset that 200 officers do ,, not show up for work each day, is cracking down on sick leave abuse that he complains is preventing the department from putting more officers on the street.The department's 3,100 officers have unlimited sick leave, one of the most liberal policies in the nation. Compared with other departments in Maryland and across the country, Baltimore's force has nearly double the percentage of officers calling in sick each day.Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier called Baltimore's figures "excessively high."
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | March 31, 1993
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden said yesterday that he will propose revisions in county policy that will curb abuses of sick-leave benefits, save the county about $750,000 a year, and satisfy local unions.Mr. Hayden said he is proposing the changes in county personnel law and policy "so employees will not lose money for being sick or injured but will not make money either."Leaders of the county-employee unions, who joined Mr. Hayden in yesterday's announcement, said they will recommend the plan to their members after their accountants study it.Under the plan, employees would receive their regular take-home pay while on sick or accident leave, not the tax-free wages called for in the current policy.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1998
When Kim Butler got sick and had to miss a week of work, her co-workers at the Department of Social Services office on Broadway in Baltimore took up a collection to help pay her bills.Although Butler works full time as an administrator, she is one of a growing number of state employees who do not get benefits many others take for granted, such as medical insurance, sick leave, vacation time and basic job protections.The employees are called "contractual workers" because they sign annual contracts to work for the state.
NEWS
August 9, 2013
Mandatory paid sick leave isn't the cure-all that op-ed writer Paul Kinzie makes it out to be. ("Paid sick leave for food workers makes us all healthier," August 7). There's a growing body of evidence that shows that these laws actually hurt the employees they're intended to help. For instance, a study by the Institute for Women's Policy Research - a group supportive of paid sick leave laws - found that nearly 30 percent of San Francisco's lowest-wage employees reported layoffs or reduced hours at their place of work following that city's passage of a paid leave mandate.
NEWS
By Paul Kinzie | August 6, 2013
Baltimore's Restaurant Week, which recently ended, can be an occasion for reflection as well as celebration. Until recently, I was a Baltimore restaurant worker, with minor interruptions, for more than seven years. In my experience, no restaurant employee ever received a paid sick day. I know of instances in which employees worked while sick. This experience is characteristic; according to a 2012 study by The Food Chain Workers Alliance, 79 percent of food system workers either do not have paid sick days (60 percent)
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
Workers in Maryland would be guaranteed seven paid sick days a year under a bill introduced Thursday in Annapolis, eliminating what advocates say is an "impossible choice" that thousands of mostly low-wage employees are forced to make between preserving their health or their jobs. "Folks are now in a place where they have to make these impossible choices," said Del. John A. Olszewski Jr., a Baltimore County Democrat and sponsor, noting that for many people, three unpaid sick days can equal a month's worth of groceries.
NEWS
December 1, 2012
It appears that the proponents of the concept of mandatory sick leave, including the authors of a recent commentary in The Sun ("Investing in health," Nov. 29), have had no experience in managing staff or managing a business. Starting out as an employee in a consulting firm decades ago, I was informed that I would accrue vacation at a certain rate but was given no specific guidelines on sick leave, except that I should notify my supervisor any day I could not come to work due to illness.
NEWS
By Barbara Morgan and Ross Eisenbrey | November 28, 2012
Having shown national leadership on marriage equality and fair treatment of immigrant children, Maryland has the opportunity to turn its attention to the plight of workers who have no access to paid sick days. The ability to earn paid sick days allows workers to avoid the choice of going to work sick or going without pay - and maybe even losing a job. Employers, workers, and the public would all benefit from such a standard. The many employers that already provide paid sick leave would have a level playing field with their competitors, and all would more easily maintain a healthy workplace.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
Ellen Bravo of the labor-aligned advocacy group Family Values @ Work claims there were few consequences in San Francisco following passage of that city's paid sick leave mandate ("Paid sick leave urged in Maryland," Nov. 12). However, even the research Ms. Bravo cites suggests otherwise. According to data published in a survey conducted by the Institute for Women's Policy Research, industries in San Francisco that didn't offer sick leave prior to the mandate were more likely to report a negative impact on profitability.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2004
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. has proposed giving expanded vacation, sick leave and paid holidays to government employees who work between 30 and 39 hours a week. The county employs hundreds of such workers, mostly in social services jobs that are funded at least partly by grant money. But because these employees are not considered part of the county's merit system, they earn fewer benefits and enjoy less job security, which has led to complaints and lawsuits. One of those suits, brought by four part-time employees, was dismissed by a Baltimore County judge last summer but is scheduled for a hearing today at the Court of Appeals.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | January 27, 1991
Council Chairman C. Vernon Gray, thwarted three weeks ago in curbingcounty supervisors who handle sick leave abuse, said this week he is"outraged" by a memo that appears to widen those powers.The Jan.11 memo has prompted Gray to consider reintroducing a bill that would limit supervisors' demands for doctors' notes from employees to prove illnesses. The council rejected the bill Jan. 7 by a 3-2 vote.The new memo, appearing four days after the vote, was issued by public works director James M. Irvin.
NEWS
November 14, 2012
Most of us likely take paid sick leave for granted. It accumulates over time, and we dip into the account when there's an injury or illness that prevents us from going to work, whether for a day or, as in the case of a serious malady, for much longer. Workers benefit most directly, but it also allows employers to attract the best and brightest workers and spares their co-workers and customers from coming into contact with a potentially contagious disease. But what so many have come to expect as a minimum standard of full-time employment, many others have never experienced first-hand.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
Raquel Rojas has never worked for a company that gave her paid sick leave. Sometimes even unpaid leave isn't on offer. The Baltimore resident said a restaurant that employed her as a line cook three years ago stopped scheduling her for work after she stayed home for two weeks to recover from pneumonia. She said she had worked through worsening symptoms for several weeks — fever, mouth sores and eventually a bad cough — until she couldn't go on. "That happened to me, but also, not just to me," Rojas, 45, said through an interpreter.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.