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NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | April 21, 1991
James Bruggy points in dismay at a seating chart of the ground floor of the Meadows East Building. Each of the 30 names written on the diagram represents a co-worker who has had a serious medical problem -- fungus balls and growths inside their heads, respiratory and eye infections, skin rashes and swelling, cancer.The name of Maura McHale Allison, who worked there less than three years, is the most recent addition. She transferred to another building on the advice of her physician three weeks ago after developing severe headaches and allergic reactions.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
A local development group is planning to revive an office tower that has stood vacant in Towson's business district for more than nine years. The last tenants left the Investment Building in 2001 amid claims by workers that poor air quality, mold and fungi were causing breathing difficulties and other health problems. On Thursday, Caves Valley Partners of Baltimore County outlined a $27 million project to strip the nearly 50-year-old structure overlooking Towson Circle down to its steel skeleton and rebuild it as the Towson City Center, with 155,000 square feet of commercial space for rent.
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NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | April 21, 1991
James Bruggy points in dismay at a seating chart of th ground floor of the Meadows East Building. Each of the 30 names written on the diagram represents a co-worker who has had a serious medical problem -- fungus balls and growths inside their heads, respiratory and eye infections, skin rashes and swelling, cancer.The name of Maura McHale Allison, who worked there less than three years, is the most recent addition. She transferred to another building on the advice of her physician three weeks ago after developing severe headaches and allergic reactions.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | July 18, 2001
Baltimore health and court officials told a crowd of more than 200 courthouse workers yesterday they would be surveyed soon to help determine whether the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse is making them sick. The hourlong meeting was punctuated by loud grumbling, groaning and some hissing - testimony to the intense frustration many workers feel about poor building conditions that have persisted for years. "I understand it," Administrative Judge Ellen M. Heller said after the meeting.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | June 1, 1993
Carroll County General Hospital officials know that the county health department building they're trying to acquire has a chronic case of "sick building syndrome."But they say they'll cure the 15-year-old, two-story structure that adjoins the hospital. Hospital officials plan to convert the building for outpatient surgery or doctors' offices.The hospital has been negotiating with the county to buy the health department building or exchange hospital-owned property for it.The county commissioners are willing to sell "to accommodate the hospital," said Commissioner Donald I. Dell.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2000
Whether the Investment Building in Towson is making its workers sick may never definitively be determined, judging from reactions to a pair of studies made public yesterday. Some Baltimore County and state employees cheered the findings of a National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health survey, saying their long-standing health complaints have been validated. The federal agency conducted two walk-through inspections in June and interviewed 23 workers who claim their illnesses are linked to conditions inside the 13-floor office building.
NEWS
December 15, 2000
STATE AND BALTIMORE County officials had no choice but to move about 1,000 employees out of the Investment Building in Towson. Although the building has not been officially deemed "sick," it might as well be. For a year and a half, employees have complained about the Investment Building's poor air and water quality. They were concerned about rashes and respiratory problems that disappeared when they were away from the building or on vacation. It wasn't until an employee came down with Legionnaires' disease in October 1999 that county officials took these complaints seriously.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
A local development group is planning to revive an office tower that has stood vacant in Towson's business district for more than nine years. The last tenants left the Investment Building in 2001 amid claims by workers that poor air quality, mold and fungi were causing breathing difficulties and other health problems. On Thursday, Caves Valley Partners of Baltimore County outlined a $27 million project to strip the nearly 50-year-old structure overlooking Towson Circle down to its steel skeleton and rebuild it as the Towson City Center, with 155,000 square feet of commercial space for rent.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1992
Sick buildingsGrowing numbers of Americans are discovering that their fatigue, irritated throats or runny noses may be caused or aggravated by working in office buildings with inadequate ventilation systems.The rise of "sick building syndrome" began in the 1970s, when there was a national push to make buildings more energy-efficient. But sealing them tightly caused air quality problems.The Environmental Protection Agency defines sick building syndrome as a situation when occupants experience acute health problems and discomfort that appear to be linked to time spent in a building.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1997
As an environmental detective of sorts, Hugh Granger has seen this kind of baffling case before. And after two weeks of testing, exploring, cleaning and venting by a variety of doctors, engineers and hygienists, he's developed a theory of what's been sending waves of people to the hospital during the past 15 days at the George H. Fallon Federal Building.The initial culprit, Granger believes, was fumes seeping into the first floor from outside, perhaps from resurfacing going on just outside the building.
NEWS
December 15, 2000
STATE AND BALTIMORE County officials had no choice but to move about 1,000 employees out of the Investment Building in Towson. Although the building has not been officially deemed "sick," it might as well be. For a year and a half, employees have complained about the Investment Building's poor air and water quality. They were concerned about rashes and respiratory problems that disappeared when they were away from the building or on vacation. It wasn't until an employee came down with Legionnaires' disease in October 1999 that county officials took these complaints seriously.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2000
Three employees have sued the owners and managers of the troubled Investment Building in Towson for $18.3 million, claiming that negligence and coverups caused them to contract debilitating illnesses from mold and other contaminants inside the building. In the suit filed yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court, Marina Eddy, Carol Fegan and Desiree Martin accuse the owners and managers of "failure to provide even the most minimal inspection, cleaning or maintenance" of the structure's heating and cooling systems, which date to 1966.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2000
Whether the Investment Building in Towson is making its workers sick may never definitively be determined, judging from reactions to a pair of studies made public yesterday. Some Baltimore County and state employees cheered the findings of a National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health survey, saying their long-standing health complaints have been validated. The federal agency conducted two walk-through inspections in June and interviewed 23 workers who claim their illnesses are linked to conditions inside the 13-floor office building.
NEWS
June 13, 2000
EMPLOYEES at the Investment Building in Towson may be closer to getting some well-deserved answers about the health of their workplace. It's refreshing to see that state and Baltimore County officials are no longer taking workers' claims lightly. Inspectors from the Maryland Occupational Safety and Health thoroughly examined the building last week and will prepare a report on their findings. This should be the first step in a long and complicated process to determine whether environmental conditions in the 13-story office tower are the source of employee illnesses.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2000
It was 4 a.m., and Marina Eddy couldn't breathe. The 40-year-old computer systems manager had spent a few hours the day before at her office -- a place she had been trying to avoid. Whenever Eddy stepped inside the Investment Building in Towson, she emerged with red eyes and squeezed lungs. Something inside the building was triggering asthma attacks and allergic reactions, she and her doctor concluded. They didn't know what it was, but it was best to stay away, they figured. Her bosses disagreed.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2000
Hoping to focus attention on their work conditions, 50 state and Baltimore County employees gathered for a quiet noontime rally yesterday outside a Towson office building that they say has poor ventilation, mold and other contaminants. "All we want is the building cleaned up," said Jane Koel, a county social worker who thinks the Investment Building has caused her breathing problems and infections, and is the source of the Legionella pneumophila bacteria present in her system. "You walk in there and you can smell the stagnation in the air. There is no circulation."
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2000
Three employees have sued the owners and managers of the troubled Investment Building in Towson for $18.3 million, claiming that negligence and coverups caused them to contract debilitating illnesses from mold and other contaminants inside the building. In the suit filed yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court, Marina Eddy, Carol Fegan and Desiree Martin accuse the owners and managers of "failure to provide even the most minimal inspection, cleaning or maintenance" of the structure's heating and cooling systems, which date to 1966.
NEWS
March 15, 1994
The Walters Art Gallery's 1974 building has developed so many problems that it can no longer safely house the institution's priceless collection of Egyptian, Greek and Roman art. Officials estimate the total cost of repairs at about $6 million -- about half of which must be raised from city, state and federal governments.The problems include a climate-control system that cannot maintain the steady temperature and humidity levels needed to preserve works of art, ceiling-mounted "reheater" coils that drip water and oil on the floor and unsafe or inadequate stairwells and handicapped access ramps.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1997
As an environmental detective of sorts, Hugh Granger has seen this kind of baffling case before. And after two weeks of testing, exploring, cleaning and venting by a variety of doctors, engineers and hygienists, he's developed a theory of what's been sending waves of people to the hospital during the past 15 days at the George H. Fallon Federal Building.The initial culprit, Granger believes, was fumes seeping into the first floor from outside, perhaps from resurfacing going on just outside the building.
NEWS
March 15, 1994
The Walters Art Gallery's 1974 building has developed so many problems that it can no longer safely house the institution's priceless collection of Egyptian, Greek and Roman art. Officials estimate the total cost of repairs at about $6 million -- about half of which must be raised from city, state and federal governments.The problems include a climate-control system that cannot maintain the steady temperature and humidity levels needed to preserve works of art, ceiling-mounted "reheater" coils that drip water and oil on the floor and unsafe or inadequate stairwells and handicapped access ramps.
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