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By Linda Lowe Morris | July 7, 1991
John Liu takes his Sichuan crispy beef very seriously. "I personally eat it at many places," he says. "They cook it American-style but it doesn't come out right."Sometimes," he continues, "you can overcook and it has a burned flavor. If I serve it that way, you're going to come back and tell me, 'Hey John, I want my money back. I don't want to eat charcoal.' This crispy beef Sichuan, you have to have a very good chef, very skilled."Mr. Liu thinks he has found such a "very good chef, very skilled" -- just the right person for the delicate crispy beef -- in Cheng Yu Huang, his partner in their new restaurant, First Wok, located in Glenmont Towers off Loch Raven Boulevard in Towson.
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By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | September 1, 2008
3 Earthquake devastates southwestern China SHANGHAI - The devastation from an earthquake that struck southwestern China Saturday might be much worse than initially feared, state-run news media reported yesterday, saying that the quake had destroyed more than 100,000 homes and that the death toll had risen to at least 28 and was likely to be higher. The earthquake, which was centered in Sichuan province and had a magnitude of 6.1, damaged highways, reservoirs, bridges and hundreds of schools, and it forced the evacuation of more than 40,000 people in Sichuan and neighboring Yunnan province, reported Xinhua, the state news agency.
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NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,Los Angeles Times | May 17, 2008
DEYANG, China -- A strong aftershock hit China's battered Sichuan region yesterday, causing landslides, knocking out telephone lines and burying vehicles, according to state news media. There were no immediate reports of deaths. The magnitude 5.5 tremor struck at 1:25 p.m. in Lixian, further complicating the job of getting aid into nearby Wenchuan, the epicenter of Monday's intense quake. The aftershock, the latest in a series this week, could be felt in Chengdu, a major city 75 miles to the southeast.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,Los Angeles Times | May 17, 2008
DEYANG, China -- A strong aftershock hit China's battered Sichuan region yesterday, causing landslides, knocking out telephone lines and burying vehicles, according to state news media. There were no immediate reports of deaths. The magnitude 5.5 tremor struck at 1:25 p.m. in Lixian, further complicating the job of getting aid into nearby Wenchuan, the epicenter of Monday's intense quake. The aftershock, the latest in a series this week, could be felt in Chengdu, a major city 75 miles to the southeast.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick | March 17, 2008
BEIJING -- Defying a major deployment of Chinese security forces, ethnic Tibetan protesters unfurled their forbidden national flag and set fire to a police station as the violence that by some reports has claimed 80 lives spread into Sichuan province and other parts of western China. The exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, met yesterday with reporters in the mountain town of Dharamsala, India, and told them he was powerless to stop the protests. "It's a people's movement, so it's up to them.
FEATURES
By Sylvia H. Badger | May 11, 1991
CENTRAL ASIATowson Market Place (facing Goucher Boulevard) Hours: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. seven days a week for lunch and dinner. Call 825-0200 or 825-0201. There are two Central Asia locations in the Towson area. I opted for the restaurant in Towson Market Place because its carryout shop in the Loch Raven Plaza Shopping Center is closed on Mondays.Have you ever seen a short Chinese menu? Nor have I, and this one is no exception.There are dozens of choices of soft noodles, chow mein, fried rice, chop suey, egg foo young, chef's suggestions and a list of 27 special dishes.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | April 24, 1993
The Panda Chinese Gourmet 6080 Falls Road at Lake Avenue. Hours: Monday through Thursday 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., Sunday 1 to 10 p.m. Call: (410) 377-4228.On a good week when there's time to cook, we probably have fried rice from the Panda only two or three times for dinner. This has been going on for about four months now, and I'm still not sick of the Panda's chicken fried rice. This is the highest praise I can think to give carryout Chinese. If two people are going to make a dinner out of it, go with the quart size for $8.50.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | January 24, 1993
Starting in April, facility-use fees for more than two dozen of Maryland's state parks and forests will be charged per person rather than by carload.The $2 fee for individuals will be in effect through October. No fees will be charged for day use during the rest of the year.Dr. Torrey C. Brown, secretary of the Department of Natural Resources, said the expansion of the per person fee program will more equitably spread the cost of recreational and educational programs in state parks and forests.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | July 20, 1991
ORIENT EXPRESS OF GEORGETOWN3111 St. Paul St. Open 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Sundays to Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Call 889-0003.My daughter first tasted chicken with broccoli from the Orient Express about three years ago. She's been a fan of the dish ever since.A return visit reminded me how the dish won her over: The large pieces of chicken are extremely tender, and the sauce light enough not to put off a finicky youngster. She even ate the broccoli, which was tender and flavorful.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | September 1, 2008
3 Earthquake devastates southwestern China SHANGHAI - The devastation from an earthquake that struck southwestern China Saturday might be much worse than initially feared, state-run news media reported yesterday, saying that the quake had destroyed more than 100,000 homes and that the death toll had risen to at least 28 and was likely to be higher. The earthquake, which was centered in Sichuan province and had a magnitude of 6.1, damaged highways, reservoirs, bridges and hundreds of schools, and it forced the evacuation of more than 40,000 people in Sichuan and neighboring Yunnan province, reported Xinhua, the state news agency.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Barbara Demick and Mark Magnier and Barbara Demick,Los Angeles Times | May 13, 2008
CHONGQING, China -- A powerful earthquake rocked China from mountains to coast yesterday afternoon, knocking down schools, homes and factories, and killing nearly 10,000 people. The quake was centered in western China's Sichuan province but was so powerful that it was felt over thousands of miles from Beijing to Bangkok, Thailand. It forced the evacuation of China's tallest building, Shanghai's Jinmao Tower, and sent high-rise workers around the country scurrying for safety. China instituted tight controls on information, setting up checkpoints to bar Chinese and foreign correspondents from severely affected areas.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick | March 17, 2008
BEIJING -- Defying a major deployment of Chinese security forces, ethnic Tibetan protesters unfurled their forbidden national flag and set fire to a police station as the violence that by some reports has claimed 80 lives spread into Sichuan province and other parts of western China. The exiled Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama, met yesterday with reporters in the mountain town of Dharamsala, India, and told them he was powerless to stop the protests. "It's a people's movement, so it's up to them.
NEWS
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to the Sun | July 25, 1999
Few Chinese restaurants in town have as grand an appearance as Tony Cheng's, located in a stately mansion on Charles Street. Walk through the round archway to the spacious back dining room, and you'll find tables dressed in pink tablecloths and bright-red exotic blooms.Waterfowl are worked in tapestry on banquettes and etched in glass between wood-trimmed booths. Shirred fabric lines a curved wall, an effect elegant enough for the White House. Aside from the out-of-place Christmas decorations, it's a room that raises expectations.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | April 24, 1993
The Panda Chinese Gourmet 6080 Falls Road at Lake Avenue. Hours: Monday through Thursday 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., Sunday 1 to 10 p.m. Call: (410) 377-4228.On a good week when there's time to cook, we probably have fried rice from the Panda only two or three times for dinner. This has been going on for about four months now, and I'm still not sick of the Panda's chicken fried rice. This is the highest praise I can think to give carryout Chinese. If two people are going to make a dinner out of it, go with the quart size for $8.50.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | January 24, 1993
Starting in April, facility-use fees for more than two dozen of Maryland's state parks and forests will be charged per person rather than by carload.The $2 fee for individuals will be in effect through October. No fees will be charged for day use during the rest of the year.Dr. Torrey C. Brown, secretary of the Department of Natural Resources, said the expansion of the per person fee program will more equitably spread the cost of recreational and educational programs in state parks and forests.
NEWS
By Bill Burton | November 10, 1991
Some say pheasant shooting is more of a sport for dogs and their handlers than for hunters.Though ringnecks are not a particularly difficult target, I'm not convinced.There's something about the harsh cry of a cockbird when flushed (especially as a dog stands by on point) that compensates for its somewhat diminished challenge as a target, though it is capable of a burst of speed approaching a mile a minute -- while its cruising speed is about half that.Thus, it's with a feeling akin to nostalgia that I anticipate Friday's opening of the season.
NEWS
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to the Sun | July 25, 1999
Few Chinese restaurants in town have as grand an appearance as Tony Cheng's, located in a stately mansion on Charles Street. Walk through the round archway to the spacious back dining room, and you'll find tables dressed in pink tablecloths and bright-red exotic blooms.Waterfowl are worked in tapestry on banquettes and etched in glass between wood-trimmed booths. Shirred fabric lines a curved wall, an effect elegant enough for the White House. Aside from the out-of-place Christmas decorations, it's a room that raises expectations.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | July 10, 1991
BEIJING -- Liu Shiming, a 22-year-old unemployed laborer in rural Sichuan province, went to the big city to seek his fortune -- and ended up finding it by selling his wife, daughter and mother into a modern-day form of slavery.Mr. Liu's story -- recounted in graphic detail last weekend in the state-run Workers' Daily newspaper under the headline "Crime Driven by Money Lust" -- underscores growing official concern about the re-emergence of an age-old problem in China: the abduction and sale of thousands of women and children each year to peasants seeking brides and extra laborers.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | July 20, 1991
ORIENT EXPRESS OF GEORGETOWN3111 St. Paul St. Open 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., Sundays to Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Call 889-0003.My daughter first tasted chicken with broccoli from the Orient Express about three years ago. She's been a fan of the dish ever since.A return visit reminded me how the dish won her over: The large pieces of chicken are extremely tender, and the sauce light enough not to put off a finicky youngster. She even ate the broccoli, which was tender and flavorful.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | July 10, 1991
BEIJING -- Liu Shiming, a 22-year-old unemployed laborer in rural Sichuan province, went to the big city to seek his fortune -- and ended up finding it by selling his wife, daughter and mother into a modern-day form of slavery.Mr. Liu's story -- recounted in graphic detail last weekend in the state-run Workers' Daily newspaper under the headline "Crime Driven by Money Lust" -- underscores growing official concern about the re-emergence of an age-old problem in China: the abduction and sale of thousands of women and children each year to peasants seeking brides and extra laborers.
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