Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSic
IN THE NEWS

Sic

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
January 29, 2007
Concert Buckwheat Zydeco in Annapolis Buckwheat Zydeco brings its energy stirred with inspired mu sic to Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St., Annapolis, at 7:30 to night. Tickets are $24.50. Call 410-268-4545 or go to ramshead tavern.com.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Last month the Associated Press Stylebook  sent out a notice of a change in the forthcoming edition: "New to Stylebook: (sic) is used to show quoted material or person's words include a misspelling, incorrect grammar, odd usage. " This is an ill-advised decision, one that I hope that publications using AP style will disregard.  Writing at Sentence first , Stan Carey quotes Jessica Mitford: " I do not like the repeated use of  sic . It seems to impart a pedantic, censorious quality to the writing.
Advertisement
FEATURES
January 9, 2006
Philadelphia-founded An Albatross' tunes can be heavy cyber thrash or progressive electronic dance. Either way, the group's shows are fast and frenetic. The band plays the Ottobar, 2549 N. Howard St., tonight along with Jakuta and Carl, Yukon and New Age Hillbilly. The mu sic starts at 9 p.m. Tickets are $8. For more information, call 410- 662-0069 or visit theotto bar.com.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 9, 2010
There has been so much response to my Sunday column on the Archdiocese of Baltimore's decision to close 13 schools, including Cardinal Gibbons School, I thought I would share some of the more interesting and thoughtful comments with all my other readers today. From Don Gainor: "You have no idea what you are talking about." From Ed Bradley: "Interesting that in an entire commentary on closing parochial grade schools you never even mentioned the reason this has to happen -- the Catholic School System is a huge global education system that was operated with almost free labor (primarily nuns)
NEWS
By Joseph Gallagher | October 18, 1991
All America is divided into those who say HARass, those who say harASS, and those who say both. My dictionaries allow either pronunciation of the verb, but permit only HARasser and HARassment. These words come from the French verb harasser, meaning to set a dog on someone or something. To incite the dog, the French say "Hare!" as we say "Sic 'em!" "Sic" (past tense: sicced) is from "seek," and can also be spelled "sick." Some synonyms for harass also pertain to animals, e.g., "hound" and "badger."
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 7, 2007
Don't look for any shrinking violets among Baltimore magazine's Power 50. Amid all The People Who Run This Town, one stood out by issuing a news release that bragged about making the list. The mega-developer? The powerhouse lawyer? The political steamroller? No, the servant of God. "DR. FRANK M. REID III, BETHEL A.M.E. CHURCH NOT ONLY IS ONE OF THE BALTIMORE MAGAZINE'S POWER 50 BUT ALSO PASTOR'S [sic] THE TWO MOST INFULENTIAL [sic] WOMEN IN BALTIMORE," the release began. Mayor Sheila Dixon and Comptroller Joan Pratt are members of Reid's congregation, and Reid gave Martin O'Malley his influential nod when the governor first ran for mayor in 1999.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 8, 2010
There has been so much response to my Sunday column on the Archdiocese of Baltimore's decision to close 13 schools, including Cardinal Gibbons School, I thought I would share some of the more interesting and thoughtful comments with all my other readers today. From Don Gainor: "You have no idea what you are talking about." From Ed Bradley: "Interesting that in an entire commentary on closing parochial grade schools you never even mentioned the reason this has to happen -- the Catholic School System is a huge global education system that was operated with almost free labor (primarily nuns)
NEWS
By Robert Erlandson and Robert Erlandson,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | December 15, 1991
Sulphur Springs, a 19th-century spa in what is now Arbutus, once lured prominent statesmen including Daniel Webster and Henry Clay to sip a glass or two of its mineral waters.An 1813 newspaper advertisement said analysis found the water "strongly impregnated with iron, sulphur, sulphuric [sic] acids, intermixed with lime."The ad also said the water "has been found to be very strengthing [sic] to those that are in debility, bad digestion, dropsey [sic], rhumatic [sic], bilious and the ague, it has made perfect cures."
NEWS
By Robert Erlandson and Robert Erlandson,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | December 15, 1991
Sulphur Springs, a 19th-century spa in what is now Arbutus, once lured prominent statesmen like Daniel Webster and Henry Clay to sip a glass or two of its mineral waters.An 1813 newspaper advertisement said analysis found the water "strongly impregnated with iron, sulphur, sulphuric [sic] acids, intermixed with lime, it has been found to be very strengthing [sic] to those that are in debility, bad digestion, dropsey [sic], rhumatic [sic], bilious and the ague, it has made perfect cures."Besides the purported health benefits, ads for the spa, which apparently dated back to at least the late 18th century, offered visitors the best accommodations and the finest cuisine.
NEWS
By Andrew Reiner | November 27, 2003
ON THIS DAY, our thoughts naturally turn to images of Pilgrims looking carefree and well groomed, as they do in decorations everywhere. Of course, the Pilgrims were neither, because their lives were short and brutish and looking good in black was the least of their worries. This is just one of the common fallacies we have about Thanksgiving and the people we credit with its founding. (Another one, of course, is that the Pilgrims were the first English people to settle in the New World; but 14 years before they stepped on Plymouth Rock, Jamestown, Va., became the first English settlement.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2009
In my spare time, I'm going to open a flier-proofreading business. I wouldn't charge a thing; though it might be nice if the flier distributors considered bartering the services they advertise, just once, for my family and me. And no, I am quite sure I didn't mean "for my family and I." Here's my plan: I would definitely benefit from a one-time housecleaning, home exterior power washing, lawn analysis, junk pickup or any number of services proffered via fliers stuffed in my front door.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 7, 2007
Don't look for any shrinking violets among Baltimore magazine's Power 50. Amid all The People Who Run This Town, one stood out by issuing a news release that bragged about making the list. The mega-developer? The powerhouse lawyer? The political steamroller? No, the servant of God. "DR. FRANK M. REID III, BETHEL A.M.E. CHURCH NOT ONLY IS ONE OF THE BALTIMORE MAGAZINE'S POWER 50 BUT ALSO PASTOR'S [sic] THE TWO MOST INFULENTIAL [sic] WOMEN IN BALTIMORE," the release began. Mayor Sheila Dixon and Comptroller Joan Pratt are members of Reid's congregation, and Reid gave Martin O'Malley his influential nod when the governor first ran for mayor in 1999.
FEATURES
January 29, 2007
Concert Buckwheat Zydeco in Annapolis Buckwheat Zydeco brings its energy stirred with inspired mu sic to Rams Head Tavern, 33 West St., Annapolis, at 7:30 to night. Tickets are $24.50. Call 410-268-4545 or go to ramshead tavern.com.
FEATURES
January 9, 2006
Philadelphia-founded An Albatross' tunes can be heavy cyber thrash or progressive electronic dance. Either way, the group's shows are fast and frenetic. The band plays the Ottobar, 2549 N. Howard St., tonight along with Jakuta and Carl, Yukon and New Age Hillbilly. The mu sic starts at 9 p.m. Tickets are $8. For more information, call 410- 662-0069 or visit theotto bar.com.
NEWS
By Andrew Reiner | November 27, 2003
ON THIS DAY, our thoughts naturally turn to images of Pilgrims looking carefree and well groomed, as they do in decorations everywhere. Of course, the Pilgrims were neither, because their lives were short and brutish and looking good in black was the least of their worries. This is just one of the common fallacies we have about Thanksgiving and the people we credit with its founding. (Another one, of course, is that the Pilgrims were the first English people to settle in the New World; but 14 years before they stepped on Plymouth Rock, Jamestown, Va., became the first English settlement.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1998
Kimberly Smith wrote poems to cope with the death of her parents and sister, who were killed nine years ago in a Florida car crash. Now, those same words scratched long ago on pages torn from a dime-store notebook are being used to comfort her young daughters.Smith, 30, became the latest tragedy for the Northeast Baltimore family this weekend, when she was found in Govans fatally shot in the head in a car next to her boyfriend, who was wounded in the back during the attack. She was six weeks pregnant.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 8, 1997
Sagging lottery revenues? Governor grim? Legislators worried? Yeah, well, Charlie Alsruhe, a TJI reader in Parkville, has been contemplating the problems, too. He's been thinking about the Maryland lottery a lot lately, wondering why it doesn't do better among we, the people. He did some math."I was sitting here dreaming of winning the Lotto jackpot," Charlie says, "and going to Hawaii and watching half-naked girls do the hula, grass skirts, beautiful beaches. . . . I read that the odds were about 7 million-to-1 for winning.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.