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August 30, 1995
A 14-year-old Siberian tiger was euthanized yesterday at the Baltimore Zoo. The tiger was suffering from kidney failure, according to zoo officials.Though born at the Moscow Zoo in 1981, the tiger, named Alisa, had come to Baltimore in 1993 from the New York Wildlife Park.She was mated to the zoo's male Siberian tiger, Fasier, and gave birth to two cubs in July 1993. The two cubs, named Nadia and Natasha, now weigh between 300 pounds and 400 pounds and still live at the zoo.The zoo has four tigers remaining.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
How big is this little tiger cub? He's about to find otu. An employee of the Royev Ruchey zoo in Siberia pulls the cub, just two months old, from a basket for a weigh0in. Iris, a Siberian tiger, gave birth to three cubs.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 8, 1998
TERNEY, Russia -- The Moscow economy collapses, and even the tigers far away in the forests by the Sea of Japan must pay the price.Russia had the makings of a success story here, as international efforts to protect the Siberian tiger from poachers and civilization were starting to show results after years of trying.Now new threats are coming at the tigers from all directions. Huge forest fires are burning in the northern ranges of their territory, destroying prey. An unprecedented lack of acorns last winter has made it a bad year for the wild boar that tigers love to eat. Poachers seeking tiger skins and tiger organs for Chinese folk medicines are on the prowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 17, 2001
Lions and tigers and bears, oh my. Welcome to "Zoomerang! 2001" -- the Baltimore Zoo's annual gala extravaganza. More than 2,300 gussied-up guests descended on the zoo to check out some of the furry and feathered residents and sample the fare from some 70 area restaurants and caterers. A camel and goat were among the welcoming committee at the front gate. Inside, the evening's guest of honor -- Fasier, the Siberian tiger -- posed regally in his cage. And a polar bear demonstrated swimming techniques in his pool.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | September 17, 1993
"Watch the Cubs play in Baltimore," the invitation reads.But you won't be watching baseball at Camden Yards -- not with Chicago's Cubs mired in fourth place in the National League East and the Orioles alternating win streaks and swan dives.The invitation is from the Baltimore Zoo, where a rare pair of Siberian tiger cubs born nine weeks ago will make their public debut this morningAs yet unnamed, the endangered cubs are the result of a mail-order romance arranged by the American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquariums under its Species Survival Program.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 1999
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia -- "Masha," Pavel Samolianov purrs, creeping over a pile of hay and scrap lumber outside his mansion-in-progress in the wooded outskirts of the Russian Far East's largest city."
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
How big is this little tiger cub? He's about to find otu. An employee of the Royev Ruchey zoo in Siberia pulls the cub, just two months old, from a basket for a weigh0in. Iris, a Siberian tiger, gave birth to three cubs.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | July 13, 1993
The Baltimore Zoo announced yesterday its most blessed event of the year -- the birth of a pair of endangered Siberian tiger cubs.Watched over by an infrared video camera, mother Alisa gave birth to the 4-pound pair, gender as yet undetermined, between 3:15 p.m. and 4:45 p.m. Sunday in a bed of straw placed strategically in her den by keepers. A third cub, a female, was stillborn.Alisa was sent here in late winter by the International Wildlife Conservation Park (formerly the Bronx Zoo) on a long-term breeding loan -- chosen along with the Baltimore Zoo's male Fasier as the nation's most genetically desirable pair of captive, prospective Siberian tiger parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 17, 2001
Lions and tigers and bears, oh my. Welcome to "Zoomerang! 2001" -- the Baltimore Zoo's annual gala extravaganza. More than 2,300 gussied-up guests descended on the zoo to check out some of the furry and feathered residents and sample the fare from some 70 area restaurants and caterers. A camel and goat were among the welcoming committee at the front gate. Inside, the evening's guest of honor -- Fasier, the Siberian tiger -- posed regally in his cage. And a polar bear demonstrated swimming techniques in his pool.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 2000
A SIBERIAN TIGER and four manatees were part of the fourth-grade classroom of Erica Steele this year. Endangered animals have become an annual theme in Steele's class. The animals her pupils choose become a focus for research, writing and reading. "A lot of my kids who didn't like to read are now grasping for books about tigers," said Steele, who teaches at Spring Garden Elementary. The pupils netted about $200 from a huge bake sale held last fall and split the proceeds between the Smithsonian National Zoological Park and manatee research institutions.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 2000
A SIBERIAN TIGER and four manatees were part of the fourth-grade classroom of Erica Steele this year. Endangered animals have become an annual theme in Steele's class. The animals her pupils choose become a focus for research, writing and reading. "A lot of my kids who didn't like to read are now grasping for books about tigers," said Steele, who teaches at Spring Garden Elementary. The pupils netted about $200 from a huge bake sale held last fall and split the proceeds between the Smithsonian National Zoological Park and manatee research institutions.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 1999
WILD ANIMALS lurk through the fourth-grade language arts curriculum of teacher Erica Guenther at Spring Garden Elementary in Hampstead.Intrigued by what they learn about protecting endangered animal species, the pupils typically chooses to fund venues of animal research and conservation. This year, they decided to aid the Siberian tiger and Florida manatee.They sold $220 worth of homemade cupcakes and brownies during a school function. The highlight to the year occurred recently when about 20 pupils visited Dr. Ben Beck, associate director of the National Zoo in Washington, to present a check for $100.
NEWS
By Diane Mikulis and Diane Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 1999
THANKS TO their school mascot -- a tiger -- pupils at West Friendship Elementary School are learning about the habits of tigers in the wild.Principal Sandra McAmis decided to expand the mascot's school-spirit role to include academics.Last year, the pupils researched different kinds of tigers. Each grade selected a species after which to name its pod -- the grouping of classrooms for a grade. The tigers chosen were Javan, Sumatran, Siberian, Saber-toothed and Bengal for grades one through five, and cubs for kindergarten.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 1999
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia -- "Masha," Pavel Samolianov purrs, creeping over a pile of hay and scrap lumber outside his mansion-in-progress in the wooded outskirts of the Russian Far East's largest city."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 8, 1998
TERNEY, Russia -- The Moscow economy collapses, and even the tigers far away in the forests by the Sea of Japan must pay the price.Russia had the makings of a success story here, as international efforts to protect the Siberian tiger from poachers and civilization were starting to show results after years of trying.Now new threats are coming at the tigers from all directions. Huge forest fires are burning in the northern ranges of their territory, destroying prey. An unprecedented lack of acorns last winter has made it a bad year for the wild boar that tigers love to eat. Poachers seeking tiger skins and tiger organs for Chinese folk medicines are on the prowl.
FEATURES
August 30, 1995
A 14-year-old Siberian tiger was euthanized yesterday at the Baltimore Zoo. The tiger was suffering from kidney failure, according to zoo officials.Though born at the Moscow Zoo in 1981, the tiger, named Alisa, had come to Baltimore in 1993 from the New York Wildlife Park.She was mated to the zoo's male Siberian tiger, Fasier, and gave birth to two cubs in July 1993. The two cubs, named Nadia and Natasha, now weigh between 300 pounds and 400 pounds and still live at the zoo.The zoo has four tigers remaining.
SPORTS
By Michael Reeb and Michael Reeb,Staff Writer | September 14, 1993
Road runners with a little mileage on them probably will remember the Baltimore Road Runners Club's Zoo Zoom 5-miler as one of the premier races on the fall calendar.The good news is that the Zoo Zoom, which will celebrate its 15th year Sept. 26, is getting bigger and better.Three years ago, the kids 1-mile walk/run was moved into the zoo grounds so that the children had the opportunity to observe some of the animals while getting exercise."Basically, what we're trying to do is make it [the Zoo Zoom]
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 26, 1999
WILD ANIMALS lurk through the fourth-grade language arts curriculum of teacher Erica Guenther at Spring Garden Elementary in Hampstead.Intrigued by what they learn about protecting endangered animal species, the pupils typically chooses to fund venues of animal research and conservation. This year, they decided to aid the Siberian tiger and Florida manatee.They sold $220 worth of homemade cupcakes and brownies during a school function. The highlight to the year occurred recently when about 20 pupils visited Dr. Ben Beck, associate director of the National Zoo in Washington, to present a check for $100.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | September 17, 1993
"Watch the Cubs play in Baltimore," the invitation reads.But you won't be watching baseball at Camden Yards -- not with Chicago's Cubs mired in fourth place in the National League East and the Orioles alternating win streaks and swan dives.The invitation is from the Baltimore Zoo, where a rare pair of Siberian tiger cubs born nine weeks ago will make their public debut this morningAs yet unnamed, the endangered cubs are the result of a mail-order romance arranged by the American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquariums under its Species Survival Program.
SPORTS
By Michael Reeb and Michael Reeb,Staff Writer | September 14, 1993
Road runners with a little mileage on them probably will remember the Baltimore Road Runners Club's Zoo Zoom 5-miler as one of the premier races on the fall calendar.The good news is that the Zoo Zoom, which will celebrate its 15th year Sept. 26, is getting bigger and better.Three years ago, the kids 1-mile walk/run was moved into the zoo grounds so that the children had the opportunity to observe some of the animals while getting exercise."Basically, what we're trying to do is make it [the Zoo Zoom]
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