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By ALICE STEINBACH | January 14, 1993
Two of the world's most unusual people died recently. But unlike the widely mourned passing of two other unusual people, Dizzy Gillespie and Rudolph Nureyev, the deaths of Yvonne and Yvette McCarther early in January were scarcely noted."
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By Diane W. Stoneback, Tribune Newspapers | March 28, 2013
Mutter Museum may leave you shocked and horrified or amazed and fascinated. Either way, its collections of bones, bodies, body parts, plus tumors and other terrors, are unforgettable. The nation's finest and oldest medical museum - celebrating its 150th anniversary this month - bills itself as "disturbingly informative," and that is absolutely true. Specimens lining its wood-and-glass display cases reveal the effects of epidemics and diseases on the body, as well as an amazing array of human curiosities and anomalies.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | September 3, 1993
Siamese twin sisters who were joined at the chest and abdomen were in good condition yesterday after surgeons at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center separated them in an operation described as brief and uncomplicated.The 4-day-old girls, whose identities were being kept secret at their parents' request, shared only skin and muscle."They didn't share organs," said Jo Martin, a hospital spokeswoman."It was a fairly simple procedure."The babies were delivered Monday in a scheduled Caesarean section, about a month premature.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1996
The world first saw Ciera and Tiera Bennett as 3-month-old Siamese twins, bundled in the arms of the doctor who had spent 7 1/2 hours in delicate surgery separating the tiny bodies joined from chest to abdomen.But the girls remained out of the spotlight until their 10th birthday yesterday, when their family went public to tell how they bucked the odds -- not just by surviving, but by pulling through with few medical difficulties."With all the problems we see with children, it is satisfying to see two who have done so well," said Dr. J. Laurance Hill, who led a team of doctors in the 1986 operation at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1996
The world first saw Ciera and Tiera Bennett as 3-month-old Siamese twins, bundled in the arms of the doctor who had spent 7 1/2 hours in delicate surgery separating the tiny bodies joined from chest to abdomen.But the girls remained out of the spotlight until their 10th birthday yesterday, when their family went public to tell how they bucked the odds -- not just by surviving, but by pulling through with few medical difficulties."With all the problems we see with children, it is satisfying to see two who have done so well," said Dr. J. Laurance Hill, who led a team of doctors in the 1986 operation at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 21, 1995
The Supreme Court has ruled that folks who sponsor a parade get to say who marches. What next?Hopkins boards are trying to join the hospital and medical school at the head, just the opposite of what they do with Siamese twins.Those were torturers, murderers and sadists in Honduras a dozen years ago, but they were OUR torturers, murderers and sadists.
TRAVEL
By Diane W. Stoneback, Tribune Newspapers | March 28, 2013
Mutter Museum may leave you shocked and horrified or amazed and fascinated. Either way, its collections of bones, bodies, body parts, plus tumors and other terrors, are unforgettable. The nation's finest and oldest medical museum - celebrating its 150th anniversary this month - bills itself as "disturbingly informative," and that is absolutely true. Specimens lining its wood-and-glass display cases reveal the effects of epidemics and diseases on the body, as well as an amazing array of human curiosities and anomalies.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | June 16, 1994
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon Benjamin S. Carson called it "the most complicated procedure I have ever been involved with" -- a 20-hour operation to separate Siamese twin girls that turned into an emergency procedure when one of the 9-month-old patients went into cardiac arrest.Nthabiseng Makwaeba died hours after the operation ended. Her sister, Mahlatse, with whom she had been joined at the back of her head, was in "very, very critical condition" after being placed on life support systems to relieve pressure on her heart and lungs.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 12, 1995
WICHITA, Kan. -- She was born a Siamese twin, and her father kidnapped her sister from the hospital days after they were separated. Her mother disappeared even before the kidnapping; her father went to jail for murder not long after. As she grew, she was moved from home to home. At 1, she was beaten. One of her foster mothers was stomped to death by gang members.But Anna Cates didn't give up. And on June 1, the shy young woman with a winning smile will march in graduation with other members of the Wichita South High School Class of 1995.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | March 19, 1994
Dr. Benjamin Carson, a Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon, will travel to South Africa next month to join a team of doctors in the delicate separation of Siamese twins who are attached at the back of the head.The girls, who are 6 months old, appear to have separate brains and a shared major blood vessel.The operation will be further complicated because one girl's brain encroaches into the other's skull.Most likely, surgeons will have to split the shared vein and reconstruct the halves so that each child has an independent and fully functioning vessel.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 21, 1995
The Supreme Court has ruled that folks who sponsor a parade get to say who marches. What next?Hopkins boards are trying to join the hospital and medical school at the head, just the opposite of what they do with Siamese twins.Those were torturers, murderers and sadists in Honduras a dozen years ago, but they were OUR torturers, murderers and sadists.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 12, 1995
WICHITA, Kan. -- She was born a Siamese twin, and her father kidnapped her sister from the hospital days after they were separated. Her mother disappeared even before the kidnapping; her father went to jail for murder not long after. As she grew, she was moved from home to home. At 1, she was beaten. One of her foster mothers was stomped to death by gang members.But Anna Cates didn't give up. And on June 1, the shy young woman with a winning smile will march in graduation with other members of the Wichita South High School Class of 1995.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | June 16, 1994
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon Benjamin S. Carson called it "the most complicated procedure I have ever been involved with" -- a 20-hour operation to separate Siamese twin girls that turned into an emergency procedure when one of the 9-month-old patients went into cardiac arrest.Nthabiseng Makwaeba died hours after the operation ended. Her sister, Mahlatse, with whom she had been joined at the back of her head, was in "very, very critical condition" after being placed on life support systems to relieve pressure on her heart and lungs.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | March 19, 1994
Dr. Benjamin Carson, a Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon, will travel to South Africa next month to join a team of doctors in the delicate separation of Siamese twins who are attached at the back of the head.The girls, who are 6 months old, appear to have separate brains and a shared major blood vessel.The operation will be further complicated because one girl's brain encroaches into the other's skull.Most likely, surgeons will have to split the shared vein and reconstruct the halves so that each child has an independent and fully functioning vessel.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | September 3, 1993
Siamese twin sisters who were joined at the chest and abdomen were in good condition yesterday after surgeons at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center separated them in an operation described as brief and uncomplicated.The 4-day-old girls, whose identities were being kept secret at their parents' request, shared only skin and muscle."They didn't share organs," said Jo Martin, a hospital spokeswoman."It was a fairly simple procedure."The babies were delivered Monday in a scheduled Caesarean section, about a month premature.
NEWS
By Katti Gray and Katti Gray,Newsday | August 22, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- Hours after the surgery that gave Angela Lakeberg most of a heart she had shared with her Siamese twin sister, the infant showed signs of continued improvement -- enough to fuel her parents' hopes that she might defy the odds.The 7-week-old baby reportedly was sucking her thumb, wetting diapers and squeezing her parents' fingers yesterday. But the ultimate delight, said a beaming Kenneth Lakeberg during a morning news conference: "Her eyes were open. . . . It was unbelievable!"
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 29, 1993
LEXINGTON, Ky. -- The 2-month-old girl doctors hoped to save with a surgical separation from her twin sister has a very good chance for recovery, her doctors say.But today or tomorrow, or the next day, maybe, as her parents hold her as much as possible, the other twin will die because she has no kidney.The decision to separate conjoined twins Brittany and Tiffany Lewis -- knowing Tiffany would die as a result -- was gut-wrenching for their parents, Kenneth and Angela Lewis of Corbin. But it was the best option because leaving the girls joined would have placed both of them at risk, doctors said yesterday.
NEWS
By Katti Gray and Katti Gray,Newsday | August 22, 1993
PHILADELPHIA -- Hours after the surgery that gave Angela Lakeberg most of a heart she had shared with her Siamese twin sister, the infant showed signs of continued improvement -- enough to fuel her parents' hopes that she might defy the odds.The 7-week-old baby reportedly was sucking her thumb, wetting diapers and squeezing her parents' fingers yesterday. But the ultimate delight, said a beaming Kenneth Lakeberg during a morning news conference: "Her eyes were open. . . . It was unbelievable!"
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 29, 1993
LEXINGTON, Ky. -- The 2-month-old girl doctors hoped to save with a surgical separation from her twin sister has a very good chance for recovery, her doctors say.But today or tomorrow, or the next day, maybe, as her parents hold her as much as possible, the other twin will die because she has no kidney.The decision to separate conjoined twins Brittany and Tiffany Lewis -- knowing Tiffany would die as a result -- was gut-wrenching for their parents, Kenneth and Angela Lewis of Corbin. But it was the best option because leaving the girls joined would have placed both of them at risk, doctors said yesterday.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | January 14, 1993
Two of the world's most unusual people died recently. But unlike the widely mourned passing of two other unusual people, Dizzy Gillespie and Rudolph Nureyev, the deaths of Yvonne and Yvette McCarther early in January were scarcely noted."
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