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NEWS
July 5, 1992
A few years ago there were 8 million Somalis; now there are 7 million. Somalia as a nation has disappeared. The diplomatic corps gone. Hospitals looted. The overthrow of dictator Mohammed Siad Barre last year, which should have rescued the country from misrule, has led to anarchy and breakdown. Somalian clan armies destroy each other and anything in sight. Their weapons are the ones the U.S. supplied to Siad Barre, or that earlier the Soviet Union did, or that later Libya did.Relief agencies toss out such figures as 1.5 million Somalis in danger of starvation, or 4.5 million who will face hunger if food is not forthcoming.
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NEWS
By SUNNI M. KHALID | November 14, 1993
Washington. -- Just before he was overthrown almost three years ago, Somalian President Mohamed Siad Barre vowed in one of his final national addresses to "leave a people without a country."By the time an armored convoy containing Mr. Siad Barre left the shell-pocked Presidential Palace in Mogadishu, the dictator hadmade good on his word. Much of the fabric of the Somalian society that had been formed over 1,400 years had been devastated in 22 years.Thirty-one years after independence -- when British and Italian Somaliland had merged to form a country where 99 percent of the inhabitants were of the same distinct ethnic stock, spoke the same language and practiced the same religion -- Somalia was in ruins.
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NEWS
January 31, 1991
The downfall of President Mohammed Siad Barre is an overdue respite for the people of Somalia from the atrocities he visited on them in 21 years of misrule.The first moves of the rebel-backed interim president, Ali Mahdi Mohamed, are correct. He promised a coalition regime of all factions, armed and unarmed. He retained the prime minister who had recently been plucked out of opposition ranks by President Siad Barre in vain hopes of quelling revolt. He promised justice, democracy and equality, plus brevity for his own rule.
NEWS
By FRANK NJUBI | August 29, 1993
Last week's dispatch of a U.S. quick reaction force to Somalia bodes ill for the U.N.'s new role as global peacemaker. What started out as a U.N. humanitarian and peacekeeping operation has turned into a United States-backed U.N. war against one warlord, Mohamed Farah Aidid.The pursuit of General Aidid resembles the United States's 1989 intrusion into Panama to grab strongman Manuel Noriega. The bad guy has been identified, a price has been placed on his head, and the U.S. Army Rangers have been sent in to hunt him down.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Nelson Schwartz and Peter Honey and Nelson Schwartz,Washington Bureau | December 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- As thousands of U.S. troops pour int Somalia, they are confronting a nation in the grip of anarchy caused, in part, by the Cold War competition between the United States and the Soviet Union for dominance in the Horn of Africa, political analysts say.Superpower rivalry for strategic footholds near the oil-rich Persian Gulf and influence in Northeast Africa led to a massive infusion of arms -- mostly Soviet, but also American -- into Somalia during...
NEWS
By FRANK NJUBI | August 29, 1993
Last week's dispatch of a U.S. quick reaction force to Somalia bodes ill for the U.N.'s new role as global peacemaker. What started out as a U.N. humanitarian and peacekeeping operation has turned into a United States-backed U.N. war against one warlord, Mohamed Farah Aidid.The pursuit of General Aidid resembles the United States's 1989 intrusion into Panama to grab strongman Manuel Noriega. The bad guy has been identified, a price has been placed on his head, and the U.S. Army Rangers have been sent in to hunt him down.
NEWS
By Christian Science Monitor | November 3, 1991
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- The arms market that nestles among stalls selling detergent and medicinal roots is potentially the most dangerous place in this city of anarchy.Anyone wanting instant authority and protection can buy grenades for less than $1.50 and any weapon from Hungarian Parabellum pistols to small artillery. Russian AK-47 rifles, now selling for $70, do best. Two clips of bullets cost less than a plate of goat meat.Since the fall of dictator Maj. Gen. Mohamed Siad Barre's 21-year regime last January, a new government has not yet taken root.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | August 7, 1992
London. -- Whatever it is in Somalia, it is not ''ethnic cleansing.'' Somalia is the only black African country which is made up of a single ethnic group, almost entirely Muslim to boot. Apparently you don't need separate tribes to have the most murderous civil war on the African continent.This is a rivalry of families and clans, fought not for religion nor ideology nor even drug turf, but merely for the prize of being able to tell the others what to do. It is a war that has gone far too far. On the Richter scale, if Yugoslavia and Cambodia are nine, Somalia is ten.Even at the height of Somalia's economic and military success during the Cold War years, when its now-overthrown president, Mohamed Siad Barre, played America against the Soviet Union for arms and aid, Somalia was the archetypal banana republic.
NEWS
By SUNNI M. KHALID | November 14, 1993
Washington. -- Just before he was overthrown almost three years ago, Somalian President Mohamed Siad Barre vowed in one of his final national addresses to "leave a people without a country."By the time an armored convoy containing Mr. Siad Barre left the shell-pocked Presidential Palace in Mogadishu, the dictator hadmade good on his word. Much of the fabric of the Somalian society that had been formed over 1,400 years had been devastated in 22 years.Thirty-one years after independence -- when British and Italian Somaliland had merged to form a country where 99 percent of the inhabitants were of the same distinct ethnic stock, spoke the same language and practiced the same religion -- Somalia was in ruins.
NEWS
By RAKIYA OMAAR and RAKIYA OMAAR,Los Angeles Times | December 27, 1991
New York--Mohammed Siad Barre, the former despot of Somalia, frequently promised he would leave behind neither a country nor a people.To a large extent, he has succeeded. The current bloodshed is the work of rival factions of the Hawiye clan and, within the same rebel movement, the United Somali Congress. Hungry for power, their two leaders are exploiting the gun culture that developed during Mr. Siad Barre's time. In Somalia now, as in many other parts of the Horn of Africa, it is easier to obtain lethal weapons than an aspirin or something to eat.The United Nations has had a wonderful year, reviving its moribund reputation by intervening in internal conflicts in the headlines, such as Yugoslavia, Cambodia and El Salvador, and in facilitating the release of Western hostages in the Middle East.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 18, 1993
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Far beneath the surface of the tragic drama of Somalia, four major U.S. oil companies are sitting on a prospective fortune in exclusive concessions to explore and exploit tens of millions of acres of the Somali countryside.That land, in the opinion of geologists and industry sources, could yield significant amounts of oil and natural gas if the U.S.-led military mission can restore peace to the impoverished NTC East African nation.According to documents obtained by the Los Angeles Times, nearly two-thirds of Somalia was allocated to the American oil giants Conoco, Amoco, Chevron and Phillips in the final years before Somalia's pro-U.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 15, 1992
BAIDOA, Somalia -- Twenty-three months after government troops sacked this town in their desperate quest to crush a tribal rebellion, the ravages of starvation can be seen everywhere.In the eyes of the little girl in black rags who stood on a street corner yesterday, holding out an empty bowl.In the silent rows of women and children, nomads who trekked in from the bush and now slump along the bomb-cracked earthen roads, some no more than stick figures, others with distended stomachs.And at the Alamin compound, where 600 youngsters left orphaned by former President Mohamed Siad Barre's butchery listlessly studied the Koran, scarcely noticing U.S. fighter-jets buzzing in sorties above.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Nelson Schwartz and Peter Honey and Nelson Schwartz,Washington Bureau | December 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- As thousands of U.S. troops pour int Somalia, they are confronting a nation in the grip of anarchy caused, in part, by the Cold War competition between the United States and the Soviet Union for dominance in the Horn of Africa, political analysts say.Superpower rivalry for strategic footholds near the oil-rich Persian Gulf and influence in Northeast Africa led to a massive infusion of arms -- mostly Soviet, but also American -- into Somalia during...
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | August 7, 1992
London. -- Whatever it is in Somalia, it is not ''ethnic cleansing.'' Somalia is the only black African country which is made up of a single ethnic group, almost entirely Muslim to boot. Apparently you don't need separate tribes to have the most murderous civil war on the African continent.This is a rivalry of families and clans, fought not for religion nor ideology nor even drug turf, but merely for the prize of being able to tell the others what to do. It is a war that has gone far too far. On the Richter scale, if Yugoslavia and Cambodia are nine, Somalia is ten.Even at the height of Somalia's economic and military success during the Cold War years, when its now-overthrown president, Mohamed Siad Barre, played America against the Soviet Union for arms and aid, Somalia was the archetypal banana republic.
NEWS
July 5, 1992
A few years ago there were 8 million Somalis; now there are 7 million. Somalia as a nation has disappeared. The diplomatic corps gone. Hospitals looted. The overthrow of dictator Mohammed Siad Barre last year, which should have rescued the country from misrule, has led to anarchy and breakdown. Somalian clan armies destroy each other and anything in sight. Their weapons are the ones the U.S. supplied to Siad Barre, or that earlier the Soviet Union did, or that later Libya did.Relief agencies toss out such figures as 1.5 million Somalis in danger of starvation, or 4.5 million who will face hunger if food is not forthcoming.
NEWS
By RAKIYA OMAAR and RAKIYA OMAAR,Los Angeles Times | December 27, 1991
New York--Mohammed Siad Barre, the former despot of Somalia, frequently promised he would leave behind neither a country nor a people.To a large extent, he has succeeded. The current bloodshed is the work of rival factions of the Hawiye clan and, within the same rebel movement, the United Somali Congress. Hungry for power, their two leaders are exploiting the gun culture that developed during Mr. Siad Barre's time. In Somalia now, as in many other parts of the Horn of Africa, it is easier to obtain lethal weapons than an aspirin or something to eat.The United Nations has had a wonderful year, reviving its moribund reputation by intervening in internal conflicts in the headlines, such as Yugoslavia, Cambodia and El Salvador, and in facilitating the release of Western hostages in the Middle East.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | December 15, 1992
BAIDOA, Somalia -- Twenty-three months after government troops sacked this town in their desperate quest to crush a tribal rebellion, the ravages of starvation can be seen everywhere.In the eyes of the little girl in black rags who stood on a street corner yesterday, holding out an empty bowl.In the silent rows of women and children, nomads who trekked in from the bush and now slump along the bomb-cracked earthen roads, some no more than stick figures, others with distended stomachs.And at the Alamin compound, where 600 youngsters left orphaned by former President Mohamed Siad Barre's butchery listlessly studied the Koran, scarcely noticing U.S. fighter-jets buzzing in sorties above.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 18, 1993
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- Far beneath the surface of the tragic drama of Somalia, four major U.S. oil companies are sitting on a prospective fortune in exclusive concessions to explore and exploit tens of millions of acres of the Somali countryside.That land, in the opinion of geologists and industry sources, could yield significant amounts of oil and natural gas if the U.S.-led military mission can restore peace to the impoverished NTC East African nation.According to documents obtained by the Los Angeles Times, nearly two-thirds of Somalia was allocated to the American oil giants Conoco, Amoco, Chevron and Phillips in the final years before Somalia's pro-U.
NEWS
By Christian Science Monitor | November 3, 1991
MOGADISHU, Somalia -- The arms market that nestles among stalls selling detergent and medicinal roots is potentially the most dangerous place in this city of anarchy.Anyone wanting instant authority and protection can buy grenades for less than $1.50 and any weapon from Hungarian Parabellum pistols to small artillery. Russian AK-47 rifles, now selling for $70, do best. Two clips of bullets cost less than a plate of goat meat.Since the fall of dictator Maj. Gen. Mohamed Siad Barre's 21-year regime last January, a new government has not yet taken root.
NEWS
January 31, 1991
The downfall of President Mohammed Siad Barre is an overdue respite for the people of Somalia from the atrocities he visited on them in 21 years of misrule.The first moves of the rebel-backed interim president, Ali Mahdi Mohamed, are correct. He promised a coalition regime of all factions, armed and unarmed. He retained the prime minister who had recently been plucked out of opposition ranks by President Siad Barre in vain hopes of quelling revolt. He promised justice, democracy and equality, plus brevity for his own rule.
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