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Shyness

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By Jeremy Manier and Jeremy Manier,Chicago Tribune | November 10, 2006
Being shy and reluctant to take chances may keep you from meeting new people or changing careers, but could it also give you cancer? That seemingly farfetched link is one focus of a University of Chicago research group that is trying to understand how temperament affects a wide range of health yardsticks. Some experts refer to the discipline by the unwieldy name of psychoneuroimmunology. The group's most recent results, published last month in the journal Hormones and Behavior, suggest the relationship between shyness and cancer is real, though the study could not draw firm conclusions about why that is. In this case, the medical payoff may have to await details that no one has nailed down.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2009
The opening night of AACC's Moonlight Troupers' production of The Glass Menagerie drew an audience of 46 at Pascal Center for Performing Arts - smaller than the cast deserved. Theatergoers who chose to skip this early Tennessee Williams work because of its familiarity, having played in the county the past two springs, might have been surprised by this unusual version. The production was carried by the professionalism of the cast, but the presentation was at times incongruous, if not frustrating, because of the unusual musical selections and set design.
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NEWS
By Meredith Moss and Meredith Moss,Cox News Service | April 23, 2000
He understands how it feels. "I was a shy adolescent and had almost no dates in high school," says Bernardo J. Carducci, now a professor of psychology at Indiana University Southeast in New Albany. "I couldn't talk to girls." These days, Carducci, 47, is talking to all kinds of people, especially to those who find shyness a stumbling block in their daily lives. He's convinced he can help. As director of the Shyness Research Institute at his university, Carducci has interviewed thousands of shy people over the past 25 years.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg | November 29, 2008
People always warn you that workplace relationships are a recipe for disaster, that they'll end in awkwardness and anger, and that they should be avoided at all costs. Maybe that conventional wisdom is still true for most people, but not for me. The only reason I'm the person and writer I am today is because I swallowed my shyness and asked that Baltimore girl - who I'd privately had a crush on for nearly a year - on a date. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.com/lifeofkings)
FEATURES
By Alison Bass and Alison Bass,Boston Globe | December 25, 1990
If you are the parent of a shy, fearful child, don't panic. New research has found that parents can help children, even those who have inherited a tendency toward shyness, overcome their timid approach to life.The news is equally encouraging for shy adults. A growing body of research indicates that shy people of all ages can learn tochange their deeply ingrained pattern of shrinking from the world."Shyness may be an inherited personality trait, but that's just the starting point," says Jonathan Cheek, associate professor of psychology at Wellesley College.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg | November 29, 2008
People always warn you that workplace relationships are a recipe for disaster, that they'll end in awkwardness and anger, and that they should be avoided at all costs. Maybe that conventional wisdom is still true for most people, but not for me. The only reason I'm the person and writer I am today is because I swallowed my shyness and asked that Baltimore girl - who I'd privately had a crush on for nearly a year - on a date. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.com/lifeofkings)
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
In 1959, Carol Burnett took Broadway by storm in "Once Upon a Mattress," a musical based on the fable "Princess and the Pea."Only this Princess Winifred was scrappy and athletic, swimming the moat to get at the prince. Staggering across the stage, grabbing men and tossing them willy-nilly, Ms. Burnett bellowed out this show-stopper:"Someone's being bashful, that's no way to be, not with me. For I am just as quiet as you, and I can understand your point of view. 'cause I've always been" -- long pause here -- "SHHHHHHHHHHY!
NEWS
By Jim Sollisch | October 27, 2000
CLEVELAND -- When I was growing up in the '60s and '70s, drugs were something kids did, parents worried about and politicians railed against. What a quaint and simple time. Today, your kid's more likely to be using Ritalin than marijuana. There's a good chance Bob Dole turned your father on to Viagra. Olympic athletes were disqualified for using cold medicine. And the presidential candidate who figures out how best to help grandma pay for her prescription drugs may win the election. And we better hope one of them figures out a permanent solution because by the time we boomers are seniors, we'll be doing more drugs than anyone could have imagined back in the '60s.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 3, 1999
Paul Mellon, the patrician art collector who turned philanthropy into his personal art form, above all through his stewardship of the National Gallery of Art, died on Monday at his home in Upperville, Va. He was 91.Paul Mellon turned from his family's world of banking and business to become an inventive benefactor of the nation's cultural life. The Mellons' gifts to museums, libraries and other causes from parks to poetry to medicine have been estimated at nearly a billion dollars. The money has gone to save seashores and encourage scholars.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | July 11, 2006
Ladies and gentlemen, the bats are out. More than six months after the opening of the National Aquarium in Baltimore's Australian exhibit, the featured attractions are on public display daily. Last October, the bats were the first animals moved to the then-under-construction exhibit. But when Animal Planet Australia: Wild Extremes was set to open in December, the six, gray-haired fruit bats appeared too stressed to leave their rooftop pen. So, the $74.6 million exhibit opened without them.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | April 27, 2008
The fifth-grade class at Gibson Island Country School in Pasadena is both proud and sad about the 800 pounds of compost the school produced this year. All of that trash was saved from a landfill. But the heavy heap represents food that students tossed out during the school year, said Christina Helowicz, a 10-year-old from Pasadena. "Sometimes we see whole sandwiches in there," she said. The students presented their findings Tuesday to their school as part of its weeklong Bay Days program.
NEWS
By Jeremy Manier and Jeremy Manier,Chicago Tribune | November 10, 2006
Being shy and reluctant to take chances may keep you from meeting new people or changing careers, but could it also give you cancer? That seemingly farfetched link is one focus of a University of Chicago research group that is trying to understand how temperament affects a wide range of health yardsticks. Some experts refer to the discipline by the unwieldy name of psychoneuroimmunology. The group's most recent results, published last month in the journal Hormones and Behavior, suggest the relationship between shyness and cancer is real, though the study could not draw firm conclusions about why that is. In this case, the medical payoff may have to await details that no one has nailed down.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | July 11, 2006
Ladies and gentlemen, the bats are out. More than six months after the opening of the National Aquarium in Baltimore's Australian exhibit, the featured attractions are on public display daily. Last October, the bats were the first animals moved to the then-under-construction exhibit. But when Animal Planet Australia: Wild Extremes was set to open in December, the six, gray-haired fruit bats appeared too stressed to leave their rooftop pen. So, the $74.6 million exhibit opened without them.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | March 1, 2005
PARENTS ARE fond of thinking of college as the next step on the path to meaningful work and economic independence. At the very least, parents think of college as a halfway house where their children can be semi-supervised while they grow up a little. But Koren Zailckas, the 24-year-old author of the brilliant and horrifying new book Smashed: Story of a Drunken Girlhood (Viking Adult, 368 pages, $21.95), gives us a very different picture of college. It is a place where everybody drinks all the time.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | October 28, 2004
ST. LOUIS - So what's next? Cats lying down with dogs? The Eagles winning an NFC championship game? The Boston Red Sox are champions of the world for the first time in 86 years, and they won in such dynamic fashion that there is little doubt that they have totally, unquestionably reversed the Curse of the Bambino. Eight straight victories against the New York Yankees and St. Louis Cardinals. Eight straight against two teams that combined to win 206 games during the regular season. They pulled off the greatest comeback in the history of baseball's postseason play to defeat the Yankees in the American League Championship Series and then turned the winningest team in baseball into a docile fellow traveler in their historic ride to the top of the baseball world.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - New York Giants running back Tiki Barber came into the world early and blossomed late. Now, at 25, he's comfortably centered, finding himself at the right place at the right time - again. Barber's first coming-out party was at the University of Virginia, where he used football and all the attention that came with it as a social tool. Now, in New York, he has enjoyed a breakthrough season on the football field and discovered a new sideline, serving in the off-season as the host of radio and television talk shows and as a TV sports anchor.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2009
The opening night of AACC's Moonlight Troupers' production of The Glass Menagerie drew an audience of 46 at Pascal Center for Performing Arts - smaller than the cast deserved. Theatergoers who chose to skip this early Tennessee Williams work because of its familiarity, having played in the county the past two springs, might have been surprised by this unusual version. The production was carried by the professionalism of the cast, but the presentation was at times incongruous, if not frustrating, because of the unusual musical selections and set design.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | March 1, 2005
PARENTS ARE fond of thinking of college as the next step on the path to meaningful work and economic independence. At the very least, parents think of college as a halfway house where their children can be semi-supervised while they grow up a little. But Koren Zailckas, the 24-year-old author of the brilliant and horrifying new book Smashed: Story of a Drunken Girlhood (Viking Adult, 368 pages, $21.95), gives us a very different picture of college. It is a place where everybody drinks all the time.
NEWS
By Jim Sollisch | October 27, 2000
CLEVELAND -- When I was growing up in the '60s and '70s, drugs were something kids did, parents worried about and politicians railed against. What a quaint and simple time. Today, your kid's more likely to be using Ritalin than marijuana. There's a good chance Bob Dole turned your father on to Viagra. Olympic athletes were disqualified for using cold medicine. And the presidential candidate who figures out how best to help grandma pay for her prescription drugs may win the election. And we better hope one of them figures out a permanent solution because by the time we boomers are seniors, we'll be doing more drugs than anyone could have imagined back in the '60s.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 7, 2000
PHILADELPHIA -- Now that it's over, let's hear it for the casting director. The Republican variety show featured more women and minorities in the acts than in the delegations. If America actually looked like the convention stage, every dot-com would be run by a woman or Hispanic. By the time Dick Cheney and George Bush made their appearances, it was something of a shock to see that the headliners were two middle-aged white guys. But, hey, that's entertainment. Even more bewildering were the cameo appearances of working-class folks and the utter disappearance of Grand Old Plutocrats.
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