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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
The more you study Bach, the deeper your admiration becomes. At first, it's the sheer structural ingenuity of the music that startles and engrosses -- all those repeated A/B patterns; the inevitable, incredibly eventful harmonic journeys from tonic to dominant and back again; the complexity and perfection of the contrapuntal dialog. From drinking in Bach's brilliant manipulation of form, it's a small step to being almost overwhelmed by the sense of something downright spiritual permeating the masses of notes, something grand and ennobling.    One of the coolest things about Bach is how all that technical and expressive beauty is as apparent in a work for solo violin as in a large-scale piece for chorus and orchestra.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
A stress injury to a finger has caused pianist Helene Grimaud to cancel performances, including one in Baltimore. She had been scheduled to open the Shriver Hall Concert Series on Sept. 21. Stepping in for Grimaud will be Angela Hewitt, who last appeared on the series in 2012. A noted Bach specialist, Hewitt will perform "The Art of Fugue" (complete) for the Shriver Hall recital, a work she has recently recorded.  
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1996
Yesterday's Live section listed the wrong phone number for information on the Leon Fleisher concert at Shriver Hall on Sunday at 7: 30 p.m. The correct number is (410) 516-7164.The Sun regrets the errors.Piano great and local favorite Leon Fleisher will be performing at Johns Hopkins University's Shriver Hall this Sunday.In the program are works by Bach, Takacs, Sessions, Kirchner, ** Saxton, Lipatti, Hasse, Blumenfeld and Godowsky.The concert is Sunday at 7:30 p.m. at Shriver Hall at Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St. Tickets are $21-$25 general admission; $11-$13 students.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Trumpet recitals are among the rarest of events in the classical music realm. It's just a guess on my part, but I imagine that recitals by female trumpeters have tended to be ever so slightly rarer. Which is to say that Sunday evening's appearance by Tine Thing Helseth for the Shriver Hall Concert Series was extra cool. The Oslo-born trumpeter, joined by an exceptional pianist, Bretton Brown, brought with her a vivid program. There aren't a ton of works originally composed for trumpet and piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | October 19, 1995
Peter Serkin is a pianist who has never been afraid to take risks: He performs demanding contemporary pieces, many of which he has himself commissioned; and he also follows the formidable footsteps of his famous father, Rudolf, in the Austro-Germanic repertory. The program for his recital Sunday evening in Shriver Hall contains two familiar works closely associated with Rudolf Serkin -- Beethoven's fiery "Appassionata" Sonata and Brahms' monumental "Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Handel."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | October 24, 2002
If the name Pieter Wispelwey doesn't ring a bell, it should - loudly and clearly - after you catch his recital for the Shriver Hall Concert Series this weekend. The Dutch cellist has emerged over the past decade or so as an unusually imaginative artist, forever rethinking music of the past and happily, incisively exploring the music of today. Wispelwey will tackle all five of Beethoven's cello sonatas in this visit, accompanied by pianist Dejan Lazic. It's a great opportunity to dig into a major portion of the cello repertoire, with a telling guide leading the way. The sonatas provide effective mileposts for various points in Beethoven's creative life, from his early, new-kid-on-the-block days to his years of anguish over deafness and other personal problems.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | April 1, 2007
For its 42nd season, the Shriver Hall Concert Series will present a lineup that, even by this organization's perennially high standards, looks exceptional. The 2007-2008 roster of visiting artists ranges from leading pianists and singers to a famed marionette company and even a high-profile jazz band. The subscription series, held at Shriver Hall on the campus of the Johns Hopkins University, will open Sept. 30 with the excellent Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet playing music by Samuel Barber, Darius Milhaud and others.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | May 28, 1991
EVEN THOUGH The BoDeans' latest album is titled "Black And White," don't be misled to believe that race is the only issue being addressed."It's not all about colors and whites and blacks," said singer/songwriter Kurt Neumann, whose band appears at Shriver Hall at Johns Hopkins University tonight at 8 p.m. "It's also about religion, men vs. women, old vs. young. It's actually about people, any people, isolating themselves. I have a feeling that people aren't looking out for each other in general, and that's not a good thing."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 20, 1992
Mozart's "Kegelstatt" Trio derives its name from the game of skittles -- at which the great composer was presumably playing when he composed this work for his friend, the clarinetist Anton Stadler, for himself (on viola) and for a favorite piano pupil.The origin suggested by the name suggests, in turn, a slight and playful work. And, in truth, for late Mozart (it was composed in the summer of 1786), the "Kegelstatt" Trio is exactly that. But the superb performance it received last night in Shriver Hall from clarinetist David Shifrin, violist Paul Neubauer and pianist Margo Garett suggested depths beneath its small-scaled and intimate surfaces.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | November 15, 1993
Throw together a distinguished group of players and chances are the results won't be as good as they might be with with less brilliant stars who have performed together longer. There are occasions, however, when such temporary constellations are brilliant indeed. One of them took place Saturday evening in Shriver Hall when four young virtuosi with substantial solo careers -- pianist Christopher O'Riley, violinist Pamela Frank, violist Paul Neubauer and cellist Carter Brey -- got together to perform three piano quartets.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
For its 49th season, the Shriver Hall Concert Series has assembled a particularly starry lineup of classical artists. The 2014-2015 series gets started in September with the exceptional French pianist (and notable advocate for endangered wolves) Helene Grimaud, who will play a recital of works by Liszt, Ravel, Debussy and others. An October concert will feature the Belcea Quartet, a resident ensemble at London's Guildhall School and Vienna's Konzerthaus, performing Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
The more you study Bach, the deeper your admiration becomes. At first, it's the sheer structural ingenuity of the music that startles and engrosses -- all those repeated A/B patterns; the inevitable, incredibly eventful harmonic journeys from tonic to dominant and back again; the complexity and perfection of the contrapuntal dialog. From drinking in Bach's brilliant manipulation of form, it's a small step to being almost overwhelmed by the sense of something downright spiritual permeating the masses of notes, something grand and ennobling.    One of the coolest things about Bach is how all that technical and expressive beauty is as apparent in a work for solo violin as in a large-scale piece for chorus and orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
As I drove from one concert to another early Sunday evening, I thought to myself (or would have, if I were a German with perfect recall of Wilhelm Muller's poetry) that "nun ist die Welt so trube, Der Weg gehult in Schnee" -- "Now the world is so bleak, the path covered in snow. " Which is to say, the perfect way to travel to a performance of Schubert's "Winterreise," since those lines are in the first verse of the first song of this darkly beautiful cycle. That there was still some snow, along with sleet, falling on the way home was the, um, icing on the cake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
His name may not register with concert-goers as quickly as some others, but Nelson Freire is easily recognized as one of the most respected pianists on the world scene. Without a hint of showiness or artificial attitude, Freire invariably brings a sterling technique and stylistic authority to the keyboard, as he did in a recital Sunday evening for the Shriver Hall Concert Series. The pianist established at the outset, in the Siloti arrangement of Bach's G minor Organ Prelude, that the tone would be warm and richly colored all night, that the phrasing would speak eloquently.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
Two more music organizations jumped into the 2013-14 season over the weekend, producing vibrant results in both cases. The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, marking its 31st year, took the stage Sunday afternoon at Goucher College with a cohesive mix of personnel; the strings, especially, sounded much firmer. There was a fresh and involving quality to the playing throughout the concert, culminating with a warmhearted account of Mozart's "Linz" Symphony, elegantly shaped by music director Markand Thakar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Sunday's musical splendors, for me, started with the Baltimore Choral Arts Society's season finale in the afternoon at Grace United Methodist Church. The cleverly constructed program gave audiences a chance to compare different settings of the same texts. Tom Hall, longtime artistic director of the chorus, chose a good number of pieces with spiritual texts, mixing in a little Shakespeare along the way. The composers represented were decidedly tonal in orientation, and several shared a rather generic style (I would have loved at least one walk on the wild side)
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | July 18, 1991
It certainly wasn't the most glamorous way to make a name in the music business, but for the Violent Femmes, being discovered on the streets of Milwaukee while performing for a crowd in line for a Pretenders' concert was as good a beginning as any."It's been kind of romanticized a bit," lead singer Gordon Gano says. "We had been trying to get gigs anywhere -- to play for free just so people would hear the music -- and no one wanted us because we were a three piece band. It was just so unusual at the time."
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | November 29, 1990
It has taken a little time -- 28 years and 22 albums -- but The Chieftains are finally receiving the same kind of reception around the world that they've enjoyed in their Irish home for most of their existence.Of course it helps to have many of their homeland's more popular performers like U2, Midge Ure, Bob Geldof, Sinead O'Connor and Van Morrison within their fan base."We've been very fortunate to have made good friends along the way," said Paddy Moloney, the chief Chieftain. "Of course, when you stick around for as long as we have you hope somebody has been listening."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
The Shriver Hall Concert Series has another lineup of notable classical artists in store for the 2013-14 season. Mischa Maisky, said to be the only cellist who studied with two legendary cellists, Piatigorsky and Rostropovich, will open the season with a recital saluting longtime Shriver Hall Concert Series board president Jephta Drachman and her father -- Piatigorsky. Accompanied at the piano by his daughter Lily, Maisky will perform works by Beethoven, Schubert, Tchaikovsky and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Vocal recitals are rare enough in Baltimore that even a program of familiar lieder would qualify as a novelty. A program of way-off-the-beaten-path songs? That's beyond cool. Magdalena Kozena, the high-profile, Czech mezzo-soprano, and her equally high-profile accompanist, the Russian-born, Israeli-American pianist Yefim Bronfman, chose a fascinating sample of repertoire for their recital Sunday night presented by the  Shriver Hall Concert Series . Four of the five composers on the bill came from the mainstream, but the works selected for this occasion did not.  In Mussorgsky's song cycle "The Nursery," which evokes the alternately animated, awed and mischievous mindset of a child, Kozena offered an abundance of colorful vocal touches -- even a nose-thumbing gesture for good measure.
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