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NEWS
December 17, 1993
When all 10 of the public and private colleges in the Baltimore area cooperate on a project -- and when nine of the 10 chief executives choose to attend the project's launching -- it is worth remarking. In this case, the project is a public service center with an urgent mission: combating urban decay.The Shriver Center, based on the campus of the University of Maryland Baltimore County, traces its beginning to UMBC's Choice program, founded by Mark K. Shriver. Choice, funded largely by the state Department of Juvenile Services, sends recent college graduates into the cities, where they act as mentors and role models.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2005
Lauren Priebe discovered new powers last week. Using two pairs of pliers as levers, the eighth-grader and others at Corkran Middle School bent pennies until they snapped in half. "I feel strong," the 13-year-old Severn resident said. Organizers of Project ESTEEM want girls such as Lauren to maintain their strength for a more daunting task - overcoming the pressures that might discourage them from entering technical careers. Project ESTEEM, or Enhancing Science & Technology Education & Exploration Mentoring, exposes seventh- and eighth-graders to technology through hands-on activities and field trips.
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NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1997
The Shriver Center -- founded at University of Maryland, Baltimore County four years ago to produce leaders in the attack on social problems afflicting the country -- has moved into a new home and taken on a new partner.On Tuesday, a ribbon-cutting inaugurated the center's permanent quarters in the chemistry-physics building on UMBC's Catonsville campus.And center officials have signed a partnership with the Peace Corps Fellows program that expands scholastic and real-life service opportunities for volunteers returning from overseas to undertake graduate study.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2001
Her college career all of four days old, Soumi Saha boarded a yellow bus yesterday at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County campus in Catonsville and stepped off on a forlorn Baltimore block facing 33 acres of weeds. Her orders: Pick them. By hand. The Edison, N.J., native jumped to the task. "We had to do something," she said. "It was crazy." Saha, 18, and about 80 other UMBC students, community workers and neighborhood youngsters spent yesterday morning clearing vegetation, righting toppled headstones and soaking in the secrets of Mount Auburn Cemetery, the historic African-American burial ground in the southern part of the city.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1997
The Shriver Center -- founded at University of Maryland, Baltimore County four years ago to produce leaders in the attack on social problems afflicting the country -- has moved into a new home and taken on a new partner.On Tuesday, a ribbon-cutting inaugurated the center's permanent quarters in the chemistry-physics building on UMBC's Catonsville campus.And center officials have signed a partnership with the Peace Corps Fellows program that expands scholastic and real-life service opportunities for volunteers returning from overseas to undertake graduate study.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1999
In a suite of offices at the suburban campus of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, John Martello tries to nurture the Camelot spirit of the Kennedy years, when conquering social problems was a noble cause and not a quixotic quest."
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | January 17, 1994
American universities, says Sargent Shriver, must shake their ivory-tower ways and start acting more like fire departments.''Fire departments go where the fire is. Universities need to bring the intellectual resources of their faculty, plus the altruistic motivations of their students, to bear on the fire consuming our cities,'' asserts Mr. Shriver, the Kennedy brother-in-law remembered as first director of the nation's war on poverty in the '60s.He is doing more than talk up a new university role.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | December 15, 1993
Sargent and Eunice Kennedy Shriver yesterday joined officials from the University of Maryland Baltimore County to launch a new public service center devoted to combating urban decay.The Shriver Center will bring under one umbrella several existing programs, including the Choice mentoring program for inner-city youths, with a current budget of $4.6 million from public and private sources.The center also plans new initiatives focused on urban problems, including one to send returning Peace Corps workers into community assignments while they attend graduate school.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | October 27, 1999
Over the past three months, The Sun's editorial page has published its Marylanders of the Century series -- profiles of 21 people who made key contributions to the community and society. We also asked readers to contribute their own Marylanders of note. Here is a selection of the responses we received:AS THE only married Maryland couple whose accomplishments led to each being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, R. Sargent Shriver Jr. and Eunice Kennedy Shriver have rendered extraordinary service to those whom society long overlooked -- the poor and the mentally retarded.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2001
Her college career all of four days old, Soumi Saha boarded a yellow bus yesterday at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County campus in Catonsville and stepped off on a forlorn Baltimore block facing 33 acres of weeds. Her orders: Pick them. By hand. The Edison, N.J., native jumped to the task. "We had to do something," she said. "It was crazy." Saha, 18, and about 80 other UMBC students, community workers and neighborhood youngsters spent yesterday morning clearing vegetation, righting toppled headstones and soaking in the secrets of Mount Auburn Cemetery, the historic African-American burial ground in the southern part of the city.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | October 27, 1999
Over the past three months, The Sun's editorial page has published its Marylanders of the Century series -- profiles of 21 people who made key contributions to the community and society. We also asked readers to contribute their own Marylanders of note. Here is a selection of the responses we received:AS THE only married Maryland couple whose accomplishments led to each being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, R. Sargent Shriver Jr. and Eunice Kennedy Shriver have rendered extraordinary service to those whom society long overlooked -- the poor and the mentally retarded.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1999
In a suite of offices at the suburban campus of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, John Martello tries to nurture the Camelot spirit of the Kennedy years, when conquering social problems was a noble cause and not a quixotic quest."
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1997
The Shriver Center -- founded at University of Maryland, Baltimore County four years ago to produce leaders in the attack on social problems afflicting the country -- has moved into a new home and taken on a new partner.On Tuesday, a ribbon-cutting inaugurated the center's permanent quarters in the chemistry-physics building on UMBC's Catonsville campus.And center officials have signed a partnership with the Peace Corps Fellows program that expands scholastic and real-life service opportunities for volunteers returning from overseas to undertake graduate study.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1997
The Shriver Center -- founded at University of Maryland, Baltimore County four years ago to produce leaders in the attack on social problems afflicting the country -- has moved into a new home and taken on a new partner.On Tuesday, a ribbon-cutting inaugurated the center's permanent quarters in the chemistry-physics building on UMBC's Catonsville campus.And center officials have signed a partnership with the Peace Corps Fellows program that expands scholastic and real-life service opportunities for volunteers returning from overseas to undertake graduate study.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | January 17, 1994
American universities, says Sargent Shriver, must shake their ivory-tower ways and start acting more like fire departments.''Fire departments go where the fire is. Universities need to bring the intellectual resources of their faculty, plus the altruistic motivations of their students, to bear on the fire consuming our cities,'' asserts Mr. Shriver, the Kennedy brother-in-law remembered as first director of the nation's war on poverty in the '60s.He is doing more than talk up a new university role.
NEWS
December 17, 1993
When all 10 of the public and private colleges in the Baltimore area cooperate on a project -- and when nine of the 10 chief executives choose to attend the project's launching -- it is worth remarking. In this case, the project is a public service center with an urgent mission: combating urban decay.The Shriver Center, based on the campus of the University of Maryland Baltimore County, traces its beginning to UMBC's Choice program, founded by Mark K. Shriver. Choice, funded largely by the state Department of Juvenile Services, sends recent college graduates into the cities, where they act as mentors and role models.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2005
Lauren Priebe discovered new powers last week. Using two pairs of pliers as levers, the eighth-grader and others at Corkran Middle School bent pennies until they snapped in half. "I feel strong," the 13-year-old Severn resident said. Organizers of Project ESTEEM want girls such as Lauren to maintain their strength for a more daunting task - overcoming the pressures that might discourage them from entering technical careers. Project ESTEEM, or Enhancing Science & Technology Education & Exploration Mentoring, exposes seventh- and eighth-graders to technology through hands-on activities and field trips.
NEWS
August 4, 1999
The University of Maryland, Baltimore County has received $2.3 million in federal money as part of a national Department of Housing and Urban Development program to reduce lead poisoning among children in Baltimore City.The grant was awarded to the Community Lead Education and Reduction Corps [CLEARCorps] at UMBC's Shriver Center. It is part of an $80 million HUD program to attack lead poisoning nationwide. The problem is considered the greatest environmental threat to children, especially those living in older, economically depressed areas.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | December 15, 1993
Sargent and Eunice Kennedy Shriver yesterday joined officials from the University of Maryland Baltimore County to launch a new public service center devoted to combating urban decay.The Shriver Center will bring under one umbrella several existing programs, including the Choice mentoring program for inner-city youths, with a current budget of $4.6 million from public and private sources.The center also plans new initiatives focused on urban problems, including one to send returning Peace Corps workers into community assignments while they attend graduate school.
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