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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2010
Thank God he left God out of it. God, the go-to guy for post-game gratitude, surely had other things on his mind than the outcome of Game 7 of the Lakers-Celtics NBA championship. So thank you, Ron Artest, for thanking not the man upstairs but someone a little closer to home — like on the other side of the couch — after leading the Lakers to victory. "I definitely want to thank my doctor, Dr. Sandy, my psychiatrist. She really helped me relax a lot. Thank you so much," the Laker burbled Thursday night.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
As three lawyers for Maryland Live casino entered a federal courtroom Friday morning, it seemed that a list containing information on hundreds of high rollers was on the line, a trove they suspected had been taken by a former employee who had left for a competitor. But as the morning wore on, documents established that the lawyers' problem was considerably smaller. Helena Wong, a former host at Maryland Live, had emailed just 19 elite players. And Wong, who now works at Baltimore's Horseshoe casino, testified that she had gathered the names gradually in the course of her job and had not pulled off a grand heist before leaving.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine | April 23, 1998
Like any other job, reviewing albums has its perks. Each week, dozens of new albums turn up in the mail. It's a music-lover's dream! The downside, though, is that I spend several hours a week just opening CDs -- which, given how hard it can be to get the shrink-wrap off those suckers, is a music-lover's nightmare.Thank God for EZ-CD. A black plastic gizmo about the size of a large rubber eraser, it makes peeling shrink-wrap a breeze. Simply fit the jewel box into the channel on EZ-CD's bottom, slide EZ-CD along the edge, and it neatly and safely slices through the shrink-wrap.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 2, 2014
What's the reason for the tempest in the teapot of Hillary and Bill Clinton's personal finances? It can't be about how much money they have. Wealth has never disqualified someone from high office. Several of the nation's greatest presidents, who came to office with vast fortunes -- John F. Kennedy, Franklin D. Roosevelt and his fifth cousin, Teddy -- notably improved the lives of ordinary Americans. The tempest can't be about Hillary Clinton's veracity. It may have been a stretch for her to say she and her husband were "dead broke" when they left the White House, as she told ABC's Diane Sawyer.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | April 6, 1993
Boston. -- It is notable that the clearest, maybe even the sanest words heard at the Woody and Mia custody trial so far were offered up by Moses: ''Everyone knows not to have an affair with your son's sister.''This searing, flat-out judgment did not come from the Moses. It came from 14-year-old Moses Farrow Allen. This phrase was not inscribed on a stone tablet. It was written in a letter to somebody he once called Dad.Nevertheless, the boy's vision was as unclouded as his pain when he wrote, ''You have done a horrible, unforgivable, needy, ugly, stupid thing.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1997
There are only two words to describe the kind of man who would cheat against his 24-year-old son in a child's board game.Professional therapist.Or, more specifically, "Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist," one of the latest and most dysfunctional in a line of big- and small-screen shrinks going back as far as 1906's "Dr. Dippy's Sanitarium," a 15-minute silent movie comedy that takes place in a lunatic asylum.The animated series "Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist" premiered on Comedy Central in 1995.
NEWS
By Kimberly Marselas and Kimberly Marselas,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 3, 2000
Several area groups are joining in an effort to make sure that shrink-wrap used to protect boats from the winter elements does not end up damaging the environment as owners of the vessels prepare to set sail this spring. For the second year, county boaters and marina owners will be able to recycle the shrink-wrap at three collection stations. They will be available today through May 26 at the Pasadena Boatel, Port Annapolis Marina and Herrington Harbor North. Although the recycling bins are at marinas, boat owners can take shrink-wrap to the drop-off sites.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | June 29, 1995
We have entered the age of the incredible shrinking T-shirt. The kids started it, designers picked up on it and there is no turning back. The young, ever careful to stay a step ahead of the geezers, decided on change once they saw the mall sprinkled with oversize T's worn by World's Greatest Grandmas.In fashion self-defense, young women gave up their extra-large boyfriend shirts and borrowed little brother's. Trendies are now squeezing themselves into baby T's, and mature figures are gasping at the demise of baggy one-size-hides-all styles.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2004
The nation's smallest fox lives on an island. So does the world's largest tortoise. And until 13,000 years ago, so did the world's smallest humans. Biologists say it's no coincidence. The forces of evolution create island creatures that are very different from their continental cousins. Animals that migrate to islands often shrink or grow over time in response to pressures from predators, food supplies and competition for mates. Known as the island rule, it's a concept that biologists developed in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | June 24, 2009
The Obama administration is reportedly considering backing a radical plan to shrink deteriorating American cities by bulldozing entire neighborhoods and returning the land to nature. The idea, which originated in Flint, Mich. - cratered by the auto industry implosion - is to persuade disintegrating and depopulated cities to embrace their shrinkage, destroy abandoned infrastructure, save money and thereby stave off fiscal ruin. The plan makes sense on some level, but it's disturbing on another.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
Long-time ABC correspondent Lynn Sherr and I joined Howie Kurtz for some analysis Sunday on the change last week at the ABC News anchor desk involving Diane Sawyer, David Muir and George Stephanopoulos. I really like what Sherr had to say about it being so important for the person who is first in anything "to not mess up. " And Kurtz is right about where the money and power (what's left of it anyway) is in network news.   #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
NEWS
By Sheldon Caplis and Diane Bell McKoy | June 9, 2014
America is facing three pivotal points in its history: a workforce vacated by Baby Boomer retirements, a lack of teachers to prepare youth for college and give them the skills required for new and global economies, and a swiftly changing racial demographic (becoming "majority-minority" before the end of this decade). How we navigate these issues is critical. They impact whether we as a state will be able to meet our leadership and workforce needs and whether we will have teachers with the skills and cultural understanding of the communities they serve, which include a growing population of children of color and those living in under-resourced areas.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Women who work for the federal government, on the whole, make less than their male co-workers - just as in the private sector. But among the federal workers , a new study shows, that earnings gap is narrowing. Between 1992 and 2012, according to the Office of Personnel Management, the difference between earnings for men and women shrank from 30 percent to 13 percent. On orders from President Barack Obama, the Office of Personnel Management reviewed salary data from 1992, 2002 and 2012 and looked at ways to reduce the gap. The study, "Governmentwide Strategy on Advancing Pay Equality in the Federal Government," was released this month.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2013
Thousands of Maryland bus and MARC train riders could pay more for their commute starting in January after Congress failed to renew an expiring tax credit that rewards mass transit use. Current federal law allows bus and rail commuters to withhold up to $245 a month in pre-tax income. The cap falls to $130 on Jan. 1 - potentially costing frequent mass transit users hundreds of dollars a year in higher taxes. "Transit benefits are critical for thousands of Marylanders," said Rep. Donna F. Edwards, a Prince George's County Democrat whose district is home to many federal employees who use the benefit.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
Kristina and Anthony Pannone spent eight months looking for a house. The ones they liked kept getting snapped up, until they finally topped three other would-be buyers for a place in Columbia — by offering $5,100 more than the asking price. Their experience is becoming more common in the Baltimore area for a simple reason: diminishing choices. In recent months, the supply of homes for sale in the region has been at its lowest level since the housing-bubble years of the mid-2000s, according to a Baltimore Sun analysis.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | July 25, 2013
With the Maryland School Assessments nearly an after thought in some school districts, it seems a good time to look back on the trends of the past decade to see what progress Maryland has made in closing the achievement gap.  Closing that gap is, after all, what No Child Left Behind was all about. The state released a breakdown of scores by race and economic background that shows that everyone, no matter what color, had the same declines and increases. Each group's results mirrored those of the whole state, but the gaps still remain large.  The state will point out that despite these large gaps enormous progress has been made by  public schools in the past decade. In some grades and subjects, such as third grade reading the schools have cut the achievement gap in half in this past decade down to 18 percentage points.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2002
Del. Howard P. Rawlings, one of Maryland's most powerful politicians and the father of the City Council's vice president, is leading a campaign against a plan to reshape the council. Rawlings is chairman of a campaign-style committee formed last week to fight Question P, an initiative that aims to shrink the council and do away with multimember districts. Creation of the Power to the People Committee Against Question P is one indication that the ballot battle is heating up with just over a week to go before voters decide the council's fate in the Nov. 5 election.
FEATURES
By Kathleen Doheny and Kathleen Doheny,Special to The Sun | August 9, 1994
Gray hair can be colored. Flab can be fashionably dressed. Crow's feet can be ironed out. But just when it seems there's no symptom of aging that can't be tamed, it can come creeping up on you. Or creeping down.The Shrink. That gradual erosion of stature that hints (and sometimes shouts) that you are past your peak and sliding swiftly over the hill.In the beginning, of course, it's easy to ignore and rationalize The Shrink. You're not growing shorter, your kids and grandkids are just getting taller.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2013
While Ocean City saw a small increase in visitors for the Fourth of July, overall figures for the holiday weekend show a slight dip in the number of people vacationing in the resort town. Officials estimate the town's population swelled to 332,214 on July 4, about 1.5 percent higher than last year's estimate of 327,553. Officials use Demoflush numbers, a formula calculated by wastewater flow, to estimate the town population during busy periods. The four-day weekend average was 322,558, down more than 2 percent from 2012.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
Four Orioles players are still in line to start for the American League in this year's All-Star Game at Citi Field in New York, but one race is getting extremely close, according to the latest AL all-star fan balloting results released Saturday night. Orioles right fielder Nick Markakis is currently clinging to the third and final starting spot among AL outfielders, leading fourth-place Jose Bautista of the Toronto Blue Jays by just 48,493 votes. Detroit Tigers outfielder Torii Hunter, currently fifth among AL outfielders, is 64,208 votes back of Markakis.
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