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Shrimp Toast

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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | February 3, 1993
If you're not yearning for a taste of shrimp toast, perhaps you could work up an appetite for some Hershey almond pie? Either one adds new definition to the word flavor.Vivian Cassel of Timonium wanted a recipe for the pie which she remembers enjoying from "back more than I'd like to say." And, Rosemary Pierre and Ethel Wick, both of Baltimore, requested a shrimp toast recipe that had a Chinese flavor.Chef Syglowski, of the Baltimore International Culinary College, who tests the recipes which are sent in answer to requests, chose two pie recipes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Bushmill Tavern is the restaurant/bar that every neighborhood wishes it had. There's nothing fancy about the place, from the bare bones decor to the burger-centric menu, but thanks to friendly service and a ton of talent in the kitchen, locals could eat at Bushmill every night and never get bored. The Abingdon restaurant opened in February. In May, chef Mark Littleton took over in the kitchen. Littleton, who developed a loyal following in the city during his stints at Annabel Lee Tavern and the now-shuttered Adam's Eve, keeps the menu casual but shows off his cooking chops with top-notch execution and creative touches to standard dishes.
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NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 1, 2003
In Thailand, boats ply canals to bring sticky rice and pad Thai to the hungry masses. In Baltimore, the masses must take themselves down concrete rivers such as Ritchie Highway to find good Thai food. Squeezed in one of the approximately 42,000 strip malls that line Ritchie Highway between Baltimore and Annapolis, Bangkok Oriental in Pasadena has earned a deserved reputation as one of the area's best Thai restaurants. The small carryout's waiting area features a wicker chair and a couch, many elephants of various sizes, and models of those floating markets still operating in Thailand.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | June 6, 2011
At lunch time, black paper mats and red napkins are set over the mahogany tables. At dinner, ecru linens lend a dressed-up air. At either meal, the Zen-like ambiance of the Red Pearl is relaxing and, as every good restaurant should be, conducive to a pleasant eating experience. The 200-seat restaurant on Lake Kittamaqundi, in Columbia's Town Center, is just over a year old and quietly earning a reputation for creative, well-prepared classic and more contemporary Chinese cuisine.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl | December 14, 1991
GREAT EASTERN CHINESE RESTAURANT 323 Park Ave., Baltimore. Hours: Open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Mondays to Fridays; noon to 11 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Call (410) 685-2868. Great Eastern's spicy pork lo mein is the only reason I ever finished renovating my Ridgely's Delight row house. Every weekend I would promise my neighbor, Art, a large order of pork lo mein ($5.50) and shrimp toast ($3.50) if he would just help me put up another panel of Sheetrock. It worked.This nifty little carryout also delivers downtown.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 29, 2003
Nope, it's not a branch of some Chinese restaurant located in another city. Eighteen years ago, owner H.C. Ting says, he was misinformed by a real-estate agent as to the exact location of the space he and his wife, Scarlett Chou, were buying. By the time they found out it was actually in Pasadena, they had ordered signs and menus and it was too late to change the name. Besides, he says, Hunan Annapolis sounds more elegant than Hunan Pasadena, and that's how he likes to think of his restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 2005
Fortune Szechuan has to be one of the most attractive Chinese restaurants in Baltimore. Located in the heart of Mount Vernon, it looks like a set from some old Fred Astaire movie, with its soaring ceilings and walls painted a rich, elegant maroon. Large windows let in the sun, which makes the enormous crystal chandeliers sparkle. Meanwhile, flames flicker merrily in a marble-mantel fireplace. Owner Leung Lo, who also helms Great Fortune in Cockeysville and Jade Garden in Towson, took over the former Tony Cheng's restaurant about three years ago and completely upgraded the place, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Bushmill Tavern is the restaurant/bar that every neighborhood wishes it had. There's nothing fancy about the place, from the bare bones decor to the burger-centric menu, but thanks to friendly service and a ton of talent in the kitchen, locals could eat at Bushmill every night and never get bored. The Abingdon restaurant opened in February. In May, chef Mark Littleton took over in the kitchen. Littleton, who developed a loyal following in the city during his stints at Annabel Lee Tavern and the now-shuttered Adam's Eve, keeps the menu casual but shows off his cooking chops with top-notch execution and creative touches to standard dishes.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | November 25, 1990
Lloyd Marcus At age 42, singer Lloyd Marcus knows stardom is a long shot. But not to worry, he says. He's met difficult challenges before.Namely, a 19-year battle with alcohol.Five years ago, Mr. Marcus was drinking a fifth of vodka a day and losing control of his life. With the help of his wife, Mary Parker, however, he entered a treatment center, and 28 days later left alcohol-free.To thank her, he wrote his first song, "When I Look in Your Eyes," and entered it in a Billboard magazine songwriting contest.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | June 6, 2011
At lunch time, black paper mats and red napkins are set over the mahogany tables. At dinner, ecru linens lend a dressed-up air. At either meal, the Zen-like ambiance of the Red Pearl is relaxing and, as every good restaurant should be, conducive to a pleasant eating experience. The 200-seat restaurant on Lake Kittamaqundi, in Columbia's Town Center, is just over a year old and quietly earning a reputation for creative, well-prepared classic and more contemporary Chinese cuisine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 2005
Fortune Szechuan has to be one of the most attractive Chinese restaurants in Baltimore. Located in the heart of Mount Vernon, it looks like a set from some old Fred Astaire movie, with its soaring ceilings and walls painted a rich, elegant maroon. Large windows let in the sun, which makes the enormous crystal chandeliers sparkle. Meanwhile, flames flicker merrily in a marble-mantel fireplace. Owner Leung Lo, who also helms Great Fortune in Cockeysville and Jade Garden in Towson, took over the former Tony Cheng's restaurant about three years ago and completely upgraded the place, he said.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 1, 2003
In Thailand, boats ply canals to bring sticky rice and pad Thai to the hungry masses. In Baltimore, the masses must take themselves down concrete rivers such as Ritchie Highway to find good Thai food. Squeezed in one of the approximately 42,000 strip malls that line Ritchie Highway between Baltimore and Annapolis, Bangkok Oriental in Pasadena has earned a deserved reputation as one of the area's best Thai restaurants. The small carryout's waiting area features a wicker chair and a couch, many elephants of various sizes, and models of those floating markets still operating in Thailand.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 29, 2003
Nope, it's not a branch of some Chinese restaurant located in another city. Eighteen years ago, owner H.C. Ting says, he was misinformed by a real-estate agent as to the exact location of the space he and his wife, Scarlett Chou, were buying. By the time they found out it was actually in Pasadena, they had ordered signs and menus and it was too late to change the name. Besides, he says, Hunan Annapolis sounds more elegant than Hunan Pasadena, and that's how he likes to think of his restaurant.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | February 3, 1993
If you're not yearning for a taste of shrimp toast, perhaps you could work up an appetite for some Hershey almond pie? Either one adds new definition to the word flavor.Vivian Cassel of Timonium wanted a recipe for the pie which she remembers enjoying from "back more than I'd like to say." And, Rosemary Pierre and Ethel Wick, both of Baltimore, requested a shrimp toast recipe that had a Chinese flavor.Chef Syglowski, of the Baltimore International Culinary College, who tests the recipes which are sent in answer to requests, chose two pie recipes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | September 11, 1992
By the extremely scientific method of counting the names under S in the telephone book, I came up with 12 Chinese restaurants called Szechuan something. (Of course, these didn't include restaurants called something Szechuan, as in the "Hunan-Szechuan Dragon Palace" or whatever.) My point is that owner Paul Chao was smart to change the name of his restaurant on Charles Street near 25th from Szechuan Gourmet to Paul Chao's Shangri-La. Just don't get it confused with his place in Severna Park, known simply as Shangri-La.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl | December 14, 1991
GREAT EASTERN CHINESE RESTAURANT 323 Park Ave., Baltimore. Hours: Open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Mondays to Fridays; noon to 11 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Call (410) 685-2868. Great Eastern's spicy pork lo mein is the only reason I ever finished renovating my Ridgely's Delight row house. Every weekend I would promise my neighbor, Art, a large order of pork lo mein ($5.50) and shrimp toast ($3.50) if he would just help me put up another panel of Sheetrock. It worked.This nifty little carryout also delivers downtown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | September 11, 1992
By the extremely scientific method of counting the names under S in the telephone book, I came up with 12 Chinese restaurants called Szechuan something. (Of course, these didn't include restaurants called something Szechuan, as in the "Hunan-Szechuan Dragon Palace" or whatever.) My point is that owner Paul Chao was smart to change the name of his restaurant on Charles Street near 25th from Szechuan Gourmet to Paul Chao's Shangri-La. Just don't get it confused with his place in Severna Park, known simply as Shangri-La.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl | August 22, 1992
Hing WahSuite 101, 212 S. Bond St., Bel Air.Hours: 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays to Thursdays,11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays.(410) 879-8883. Cheap lunchtime specials first wooed me inside this Chinese restaurant and carryout. Super service and an extensive menu keep me, and lots of other Bel Air office workers, coming back.Shrimp with lobster sauce and pork fried rice is only $4.95 at lunchtime. Other dishes, such as chicken chow mein, cost even less at $3.95. Lunch box specials are available Mondays to Saturdays from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.Warning: If you don't like it hot, say so before ordering.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | November 25, 1990
Lloyd Marcus At age 42, singer Lloyd Marcus knows stardom is a long shot. But not to worry, he says. He's met difficult challenges before.Namely, a 19-year battle with alcohol.Five years ago, Mr. Marcus was drinking a fifth of vodka a day and losing control of his life. With the help of his wife, Mary Parker, however, he entered a treatment center, and 28 days later left alcohol-free.To thank her, he wrote his first song, "When I Look in Your Eyes," and entered it in a Billboard magazine songwriting contest.
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