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By Mike Giuliano | August 8, 2012
"The Taming of the Shrew" is such an unruly romantic comedy that there are advantages to staging it outdoors, where the running argument between a man and woman leads to some actual running. Although the Baltimore Shakespeare Factory production literally running in the meadow of Evergreen Museum & Library is more notable for its enthusiasm than its accomplishment, that kind of silliness is agreeable on a summer evening. It's also nice that the Baltimore Shakespeare Factory is helping to fill the void left by the defunct Baltimore Shakespeare Festival, which also staged its shows outdoors at Evergreen in north Baltimore and indoors at St. Mary's Outreach Center in Hampden.
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July 3, 2013
I kept reading the Howard County Times' review of Chesapeake Shakespeare Company's production of "Taming of the Shrew" waiting for the punch line. Just like the production, which I saw with my family on June 23, I waited patiently through all the overacting and slapstick for the moment when they would tell us how silly Shakespeare's morality play about the inferiority of women was. It never happened. Given Chesapeake's modern and funny interpretations of Shakespeare, I looked forward to bringing my daughters to this play.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - For many modern audiences, Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew is a troubling play that requires a few quick kicks to the misogynistic text to tame it into submission. The chief problem is the vexing ending. Having had her defiance - not to mention her free will - brainwashed out of her by her resolute bridegroom, newlywed Katherine counsels her fellow brides to "place your hands below your husband's foot." Nowadays this final scene is often performed ironically, suggesting that Kate, not her gloating husband Petruchio, actually has the upper hand.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | August 8, 2012
"The Taming of the Shrew" is such an unruly romantic comedy that there are advantages to staging it outdoors, where the running argument between a man and woman leads to some actual running. Although the Baltimore Shakespeare Factory production literally running in the meadow of Evergreen Museum & Library is more notable for its enthusiasm than its accomplishment, that kind of silliness is agreeable on a summer evening. It's also nice that the Baltimore Shakespeare Factory is helping to fill the void left by the defunct Baltimore Shakespeare Festival, which also staged its shows outdoors at Evergreen in north Baltimore and indoors at St. Mary's Outreach Center in Hampden.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Reporter | July 26, 2008
In a year that saw a woman get remarkably close to a presidential nomination and a realistic chance at reaching the White House, it may be harder than usual to swallow the notion, expressed in the closing moments of Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, that the female sex shouldn't "seek for rule, supremacy and sway, when they are bound to serve, love and obey." But there has long been a way to deal with viewpoints in this play that now give offense to our gender-respecting souls - rev up the farcical side.
NEWS
By Jane Lippy and Jane Lippy,Contributing writer | May 22, 1991
Shakespeare's "The Taming of the Shrew" is running wild across the Westminster High School stage this weekend, complete with horses, wagons and spurs.A cast of 20 will portray the tale of Kate and Petruchio, shrew and suitor, with an added twist. The students opted for achange of venue, moving the scene of the Elizabethan comedy from merry olde England to the Wild West.The student actors are certainly "very creative and generous withideas," said English teacher Stacy Byrne, the play's director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 2003
In an era in which romantic relationships often play out on reality shows, William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew remains a classic tale. Yet few people outside theatrical or literary circles are aware of its sequel, The Tamer Tamed, penned not by the great Bard himself, but a younger contemporary, John Fletcher. Rarely have audiences had the opportunity to see both plays performed by the same company, and in their entirety. In fact, the last known performance was in the 1600s.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 7, 1996
Kate dons mountain-climbing gear over her wedding dress. Her bridegroom, Petruchio, has a wardrobe full of Georgio Armani suits. Before the evening ends, nearly everyone shows up in leather and chains.Call it "The Unleashing of 'The Taming of the Shrew' " -- 1996-style.This all takes place at Center Stage. The theater that zoomed "Othello" up to the 1950s has now transmogrified Shakespeare's "Shrew" to the 1990s -- complete with cellular phones and a cherry red Yamaha motorcycle.What is it that seems modern about this early Shakespearean comedy, which has often been labeled misogynistic?
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2004
Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre typically slots a Shakespearean comedy for July, the central month of its calendar. This year's 39th season brings the tale of a wealthy father trying to marry off his difficult older daughter before choosing a groom for his younger, angelic daughter from her many suitors. William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew arrives July 2 at the 200-seat outdoor theater near City Dock in downtown Annapolis. In rehearsal since May, first-time Summer Garden director Barry Genderson has developed an easy rapport with his actors that was apparent during last Thursday's rehearsal at Germantown Elementary.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2007
To open their 35th season, J. Ernest Green and the Annapolis Chorale brought their talents in the Broadway musical genre to Cole Porter's Kiss Me Kate, investing it with everything this classic deserves. Instead of a synthesizer or small combo, Green and the Annapolis Chorale offered a full orchestra, 170-voice chorus and leading players who are classically trained singers. With the overture downbeat Saturday night, the audience was instantly immersed in Porter's fabulous score. From the liveliness of "Another Op'nin', Another Show" to the lush romanticism of "So in Love" to the infectious rhythms of "Too Darn Hot" and the delicious schmaltz of "Wunderbar," the Annapolis Chamber Orchestra transported us back to Broadway's golden age. The Maryland Hall stage was so full with chorus and orchestra that there seemed little room for any dramatic action to create the Kiss Me Kate/The Taming of the Shrew play within a play.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Reporter | July 26, 2008
In a year that saw a woman get remarkably close to a presidential nomination and a realistic chance at reaching the White House, it may be harder than usual to swallow the notion, expressed in the closing moments of Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, that the female sex shouldn't "seek for rule, supremacy and sway, when they are bound to serve, love and obey." But there has long been a way to deal with viewpoints in this play that now give offense to our gender-respecting souls - rev up the farcical side.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 12, 2007
To open their 35th season, J. Ernest Green and the Annapolis Chorale brought their talents in the Broadway musical genre to Cole Porter's Kiss Me Kate, investing it with everything this classic deserves. Instead of a synthesizer or small combo, Green and the Annapolis Chorale offered a full orchestra, 170-voice chorus and leading players who are classically trained singers. With the overture downbeat Saturday night, the audience was instantly immersed in Porter's fabulous score. From the liveliness of "Another Op'nin', Another Show" to the lush romanticism of "So in Love" to the infectious rhythms of "Too Darn Hot" and the delicious schmaltz of "Wunderbar," the Annapolis Chamber Orchestra transported us back to Broadway's golden age. The Maryland Hall stage was so full with chorus and orchestra that there seemed little room for any dramatic action to create the Kiss Me Kate/The Taming of the Shrew play within a play.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,special to the sun | September 22, 2006
In the opening chorus of Kiss Me, Kate, Cole Porter rhymes "show" with "Baltimo'." Somebody should have told him we don't pronounce it that way. But that is the only thing to complain about in the show, which runs through Nov. 19 at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia. Kiss Me, Kate boasts Porter's finest score: "Another Op'nin', Another Show," "Why Can't You Behave?," "Wunderbar," "So in Love," "We Open in Venice," "I Hate Men," "Were Thine That Special Face," "Too Darn Hot," "Where Is the Life that Late I Led?
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 15, 2006
There are various ways to tame Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, a comedy with a thorny wife-subjugation ending. Cole Porter turned it into the musical Kiss Me, Kate. The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company's approach comes closer to an Elizabethan episode of Upstairs, Downstairs. Love is not only in the air among the upper classes in director Patrick Kilpatrick's production, it also infects the servants. The play concerns two sisters -- sweet Bianca (Ashly Ruth Fishell) and older, vile-tempered Katherine (Kate Michelsen-Graham)
NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 2006
For three summers, the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company has mounted an outdoor production at the Patapsco Female Institute in Ellicott City. This year the troupe offers a double bill: a comedy, The Taming of the Shrew, alternating with the tragedy King Lear. The Shrew is given a bright, funny production by director Patrick Kilpatrick and a lively cast. It is the story of a wealthy man, Baptista, and his daughters, the rebellious, disagreeable Katharine and the quiet, obedient Bianca. Bianca has many admirers, but Baptista insists his elder and more troublesome daughter must be married first.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2004
At Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre, Shakespeare has been transported to the 1950s, where he seems at home amid City Dock's contemporary sounds of revving motors and occasional siren blasts. The Bard gains accessibility in this informal outdoor setting. Before The Taming of the Shrew begins, director Barry Genderson transports the audience back to the 1950s with such vintage recordings as Mario Lanza's "Be My Love," Rosemary Clooney's "Botch-A-Me" and Dean Martin's "That's Amore." The music enhances appreciation of the striking set, easily the best I've seen at Summer Garden and inspired by Genderson's fascination with surrealist artist Giorgio de Chirico.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 1998
I've loved Cole Porter's "Kiss Me Kate" since I was a child and would sit for hours in front of my dad's old stereo wearing out the grooves to repeat songs such as "So in Love," "Too Darn Hot," "Another Op'nin', Another Show" and "Brush Up Your Shakespeare."This play-within-a-play musical about love and dysfunction within a troupe of actors mounting Shakespeare's "Taming of the Shrew" is one of Porter's masterpieces.Most of the work's sassy color and vivacious wit is on display at the Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre's production of "Kiss Me Kate," which plays Thursday through Sunday evenings through Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 27, 1992
For years now, directors have been throwing Shakespeare into unusual settings, largely for the recondite pleasures of confounding critics. But now somebody's really broken through a membrane: "Taming of the Shrew" on ice!As awful as it sounds, "The Cutting Edge" is an enjoyable piffle, completely divorced from any recognizeable reality (and from Shakespeare), which may be part of its charm. D.B. Sweeney, heretofore unremarkable in films like "Memphis Belle" and "Gardens of Stone," gets to work a little snap-crackle-and-pop into his routine; he's linked to rich girl and snooty princess Moira Kelly.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2004
Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre typically slots a Shakespearean comedy for July, the central month of its calendar. This year's 39th season brings the tale of a wealthy father trying to marry off his difficult older daughter before choosing a groom for his younger, angelic daughter from her many suitors. William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew arrives July 2 at the 200-seat outdoor theater near City Dock in downtown Annapolis. In rehearsal since May, first-time Summer Garden director Barry Genderson has developed an easy rapport with his actors that was apparent during last Thursday's rehearsal at Germantown Elementary.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - For many modern audiences, Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew is a troubling play that requires a few quick kicks to the misogynistic text to tame it into submission. The chief problem is the vexing ending. Having had her defiance - not to mention her free will - brainwashed out of her by her resolute bridegroom, newlywed Katherine counsels her fellow brides to "place your hands below your husband's foot." Nowadays this final scene is often performed ironically, suggesting that Kate, not her gloating husband Petruchio, actually has the upper hand.
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