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NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2005
A 22-year-old worker lost his right hand yesterday when it became ensnared in a paper shredder he was operating at the Athelas Institute office in Hanover, authorities said. Dan Parks, 22, of Owings Mills was taken by helicopter to Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore and was being was being prepared for surgery at the hospital's Curtis Hand Center yesterday afternoon, according to hospital spokeswoman Debra Schindler-Kohlhepp. Parks was in stable condition. A company employee called for help at 11:52 a.m., said Capt.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 20, 2014
Faithful readers know that the impending wedding of my daughter has caused me to clean out all the rats' nests and cubby holes in my basement that haven't been inspected in years. You'd think we were holding the reception there. Anyway, among the boxes was one containing about 15 years of canceled checks, bank statements, health insurance forms and tax returns. Even I, renowned recycling maven, haven't got the nerve to put that much personal information out on the curb, so I purchased my own personal shredder, which is a lot like purchasing your own personal fax machine.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stuart Silverstein and Stuart Silverstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 14, 2000
Ever since an unknown thief ran up thousands of dollars in charges on her family's credit card, Cathy Chung has worried about snoops and criminals who snatch private information from the unsuspecting. "You have people going through trash cans. Nothing is safe any more," said Chung, a stay-at-home mother of three. That explains one of her first purchases for the study of her new Los Angeles home: a $35 paper shredder. The personal shredder has emerged as a common business tool and home appliance -- you have your toaster, your power drill, your shredder -- and that says plenty about the world we live in. For its growing ranks of enthusiasts, the shredder has become a cheap and satisfying way to register a protest against a society that is strangling them in paperwork, invading their privacy and making their lives more complicated.
BUSINESS
Liz F. Kay | October 21, 2011
Here's a weekend project: protect yourself from identity theft. Spend a little time cleaning out your filing cabinets and bring documents that you want to destroy to Parkville's Destinations Credit Union from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Incred-A-Shred will have one of their mobile shredding units at the credit union at that time. Destinations is at 8767 Satyr Hill Road, Parkville. Wondering what documents you need to hang on to, and which you can toss (into a shredder)
NEWS
August 24, 1993
POLICE LOG* Ellicott City: 9200 block of Baltimore National Pike: An $1,800 generator was stolen from a vehicle parked near a Kmart store at Chatham Mall late Sunday afternoon.* Elkridge: 6400 block of Lawyers Hill Road: An orange $500 Black and Decker wood shredder was stolen from a driveway between Aug. 4 and late Wednesday.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | January 23, 1991
In a settlement with the state, McGregor Printing Co. has agreed to pay a $1,340 fine in the death of a worker last March.The amount is $2,015 less than the Maryland Occupational Safety and Healthoffice originally fined the manufacturer of computer and business forms.Of the five charges against McGregor, the state agreed to drop one, merge two others and reduce fines on the remaining two, saidDavid B. Weisgerber of Westminster, a lawyer for the company.MOSH had charged McGregor with safety violations after Martin L. Collins, 36, of Westminster died when he fell or was pulled into a shredder he was operating at the plant on New Windsor Road.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1996
A state appeals court yesterday granted 37 neighbors the right to renew their court battle against an auto scrap yard they say has endangered their Southwest Baltimore community for decades with explosions and flying debris.The Court of Special Appeals ruled that neighbors in Mill Hill may have their nuisance suit against United Iron and Metal Co. retried.The ruling reverses a March 1 decision by Baltimore Circuit Judge Hilary D. Caplan that dismissed the $40 million suit.Clara B. Mullins, a plaintiff who lives about 100 yards from the facility in the 2600 block of Wilkens Ave., said she was "thrilled" with the ruling.
NEWS
April 12, 2007
ED CHARON, 71 `The Rev. Shredder' Ed Charon, who gained fame for ripping apart telephone books, often as he preached, died Sunday in Sutherlin, Ore. The retired pastor at Umpqua Trinity Fellowship in Roseburg collapsed after returning from a church service, his wife, Betty, said. In September, Mr. Charon tore through 56 Portland directories, each 1,006 pages long, in three minutes, claiming a Guinness World Record for the fifth time. With that, he retired from performing such feats for the record books.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Staff | April 18, 2004
On a recent episode of the NBC-TV sitcom Whoopi, Whoopi Goldberg's character had her identity stolen and her friend was shocked -- not that a 58-year-old man was passing himself off as her, but that she doesn't shred. As more Americans are discovering, tearing up credit offers and canceled checks into tiny pieces by hand doesn't cut it any more. With thieves, sometimes derided as Dumpster divers, willing to dig through coffee grounds and rotting food to retrieve bits of personal financial information, a shredder has become a must, identity theft experts say. "That is the safe way to minimize your risk," said Jay Foley, co-executive director of the Identity Theft Resource Center in San Diego.
BUSINESS
Liz F. Kay | October 21, 2011
Here's a weekend project: protect yourself from identity theft. Spend a little time cleaning out your filing cabinets and bring documents that you want to destroy to Parkville's Destinations Credit Union from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Incred-A-Shred will have one of their mobile shredding units at the credit union at that time. Destinations is at 8767 Satyr Hill Road, Parkville. Wondering what documents you need to hang on to, and which you can toss (into a shredder)
NEWS
April 12, 2007
ED CHARON, 71 `The Rev. Shredder' Ed Charon, who gained fame for ripping apart telephone books, often as he preached, died Sunday in Sutherlin, Ore. The retired pastor at Umpqua Trinity Fellowship in Roseburg collapsed after returning from a church service, his wife, Betty, said. In September, Mr. Charon tore through 56 Portland directories, each 1,006 pages long, in three minutes, claiming a Guinness World Record for the fifth time. With that, he retired from performing such feats for the record books.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN REPORTER | October 29, 2005
In the endless autumnal struggle between man and leaves, man has never had as many weapons at his disposal as he does now. Never before have the forces of modern technology and simple innovation been marshaled so effectively to clear our yards and lawns. The result: The leaves no longer stand a chance, and man has been freed to spend more time doing what he does best on weekends -- clicking between football games with the remote. Now as he fights the Leaf Wars, man -- and woman, of course -- can do everything from unleashing the awesome fury of something called the Deluxe Electric Leaf Shredder to utilizing the low-tech brilliance of Gardex Leaf Scoops, which let you scoop leaves like some deranged garden version of Edward Scissorhands.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2005
A 22-year-old worker lost his right hand yesterday when it became ensnared in a paper shredder he was operating at the Athelas Institute office in Hanover, authorities said. Dan Parks, 22, of Owings Mills was taken by helicopter to Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore and was being was being prepared for surgery at the hospital's Curtis Hand Center yesterday afternoon, according to hospital spokeswoman Debra Schindler-Kohlhepp. Parks was in stable condition. A company employee called for help at 11:52 a.m., said Capt.
NEWS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
Do you shred? Does the sound of razor-sharp blades slicing and dicing paper make you gleeful? Are you finding yourself shoving all manner of things into your shredder just to see what happens, whether it's paper, plastic or metal (darn those paper clips!)? Do you breathe a sigh of relief after you watch that MasterCard bill from 1989 transform into confetti? If so, welcome to Club Shred, fellow destroyer of all things tangible that could do us harm. It's not an exclusive club. Anyone can join.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Staff | April 18, 2004
On a recent episode of the NBC-TV sitcom Whoopi, Whoopi Goldberg's character had her identity stolen and her friend was shocked -- not that a 58-year-old man was passing himself off as her, but that she doesn't shred. As more Americans are discovering, tearing up credit offers and canceled checks into tiny pieces by hand doesn't cut it any more. With thieves, sometimes derided as Dumpster divers, willing to dig through coffee grounds and rotting food to retrieve bits of personal financial information, a shredder has become a must, identity theft experts say. "That is the safe way to minimize your risk," said Jay Foley, co-executive director of the Identity Theft Resource Center in San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stuart Silverstein and Stuart Silverstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 14, 2000
Ever since an unknown thief ran up thousands of dollars in charges on her family's credit card, Cathy Chung has worried about snoops and criminals who snatch private information from the unsuspecting. "You have people going through trash cans. Nothing is safe any more," said Chung, a stay-at-home mother of three. That explains one of her first purchases for the study of her new Los Angeles home: a $35 paper shredder. The personal shredder has emerged as a common business tool and home appliance -- you have your toaster, your power drill, your shredder -- and that says plenty about the world we live in. For its growing ranks of enthusiasts, the shredder has become a cheap and satisfying way to register a protest against a society that is strangling them in paperwork, invading their privacy and making their lives more complicated.
NEWS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
Do you shred? Does the sound of razor-sharp blades slicing and dicing paper make you gleeful? Are you finding yourself shoving all manner of things into your shredder just to see what happens, whether it's paper, plastic or metal (darn those paper clips!)? Do you breathe a sigh of relief after you watch that MasterCard bill from 1989 transform into confetti? If so, welcome to Club Shred, fellow destroyer of all things tangible that could do us harm. It's not an exclusive club. Anyone can join.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | January 10, 1991
EVERYTHING was going fine for 8-year-old Andre Vince at last night's Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles concert until April O'Neil, the Turtles' favorite and most telegenic TV reporter, belted out her torch song.Too slow!So Andre let loose with a long raspberry, amplified through his cotton candy cone. "This song is super messed up," he said. "Nobody should sing songs like that in the Baltimore Arena." He had come downtown for something else entirely. "I like the kind of music the Turtles sing," Vince said.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | February 8, 1998
YAMANOUCHI, Japan -- What is this world coming to? The most glamorous ski race of all got buried by a blizzard yesterday, while the first grunge event in Olympic history took place under brilliant sunshine.It was snowboarding's moment, the biggest alternative event since Lollapalooza, a day slackers ruled. And with the men's downhill postponed (A snowout in a ski race? Was Randy Johnson pitching?), even the skiing purists had to watch on TV.Tapping into that all-important thrash-metal audience, CBS had a chance to get up-and-close-and personal with Chris Klug, the top U.S. hope in the men's giant slalom, ponytail and all.Did Klug go for it?
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1996
A state appeals court yesterday granted 37 neighbors the right to renew their court battle against an auto scrap yard they say has endangered their Southwest Baltimore community for decades with explosions and flying debris.The Court of Special Appeals ruled that neighbors in Mill Hill may have their nuisance suit against United Iron and Metal Co. retried.The ruling reverses a March 1 decision by Baltimore Circuit Judge Hilary D. Caplan that dismissed the $40 million suit.Clara B. Mullins, a plaintiff who lives about 100 yards from the facility in the 2600 block of Wilkens Ave., said she was "thrilled" with the ruling.
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