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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | June 24, 1999
Before he succeeded Branford Marsalis as leader of "The Tonight Show" band, Kevin Eubanks was considered one of the most versatile and technically proficient guitarists in jazz. Although he has recorded a little bit of everything over the years, from smooth jazz to fusion, Eubanks' forte is be-bop- derived mainstream jazz, the sort of music that works best in intimate surroundings. That's all the more reason not to miss his appearance at the Recher Theatre in Towson this Saturday.Tickets are $20 ($22 at the door)
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2010
COLLEGE PARK — At 6 feet 4 and 315 pounds, A.J. Francis made the most of his bit roles in high school musicals, turning in memorable performances as Officer Krupke in "West Side Story" and the thuggish gambler Big Jule in "Guys and Dolls." Now the one-time song-and-dance man would like to chew up the scenery and the opposition as the leading man on Maryland's defensive line, starting with today's Red-White Spring Game at Byrd Stadium. "It's all entertainment," says Francis, a nose tackle, of his passion for the bright lights of stage and stadium.
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NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 15, 2003
PARIS - When the French foreign minister ended his speech yesterday to the United Nations Security Council and was rewarded with applause, many people who have watched his career half expected him to stand up, flip his head of ample hair backward, stretch his arms fully and take a deep bow. Foreign Minister Dominique de Villepin, who has become a household face in America if not a household name, has long been a showman in French politics. He is as famous for his energetic temper as for his suave looks and lyrical style of speaking, and, according to French observers, has never failed to stop in his tracks when he sees a television camera.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | October 10, 2007
Fifth-ranked Andy Roddick was up a set and a break last night in the 22nd annual PNC Tennis Classic when Ashley Card, a fan in the seventh row, yelled at him. "You're too far back," Card advised. Roddick, who was standing about 4 feet behind the service line to receive 6-foot-9 rookie pro John Isner's punishing serve, stopped, turned and invited the construction superintendent from Abingdon to take his place. Card, dressed in a bright yellow shirt and tan shorts, slowly came on down.
NEWS
November 25, 1991
Freddie Mercury, 45, who was known as the showman of British pop music as lead singer of the rock group Queen, died yesterday of acquired immune deficiency syndrome at his London home, his publicist said. As a flamboyant star of the British hard rock scene for almost 20 years, he took Queen to the top of the charts with hits including "Bohemian Rhapsody" and "We Are The Champions." Mr. Mercury announced he had AIDS only a day before his death, calling on his fans around the world to join the fight against the disease.
NEWS
By VICKI WELLFORD | March 16, 1993
Cub Scout Pack 269, sponsored by the Four Seasons Women's Club, recently held its annual Blue and Gold Banquet.Cubmaster Mark Hagensick presented the following advancement awards: Bobcat rank -- Stephen Tourville; Wolf rank -- Joey Frykman, Craig Maley, Patrick Price, Andy Walther, Matthew Yates, Lovett Roberson, Freddy Downing, Kevin Zoblisein, Sean Danahy, Lance Bell, Devon Hof, and Michael Strang; Bear rank -- Billy Bergbauer, Tim Anderson and Matt Hagensick....
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | March 1, 1992
Although it helped make him a fortune, Phineas Taylor Barnum admitted that he wasn't too proud of the spectacle: this tiny monkey severed at the waist and stitched to the mummified tail of a fish.But even the world's greatest showman couldn't have expected that little girls in Baltimore would burst into tears over Barnum's "Feejee mermaid" 101 years after his death."We've had a lot of children come here expecting to see the Little Mermaid or the cute mermaid on the tuna can -- and they look at this and cry their eyes out," said a publicist for the Peale Museum, which is exhibiting the monstrous wonder at its Holliday Street museum.
NEWS
December 27, 2006
He was known as the "godfather of soul," among other titles, but James Brown, the legendary singer and showman who died Christmas day at the age of 73, was more than a soul or rhythm and blues artist. He was an edgy, flashy performer with crossover appeal and extensive musical influence. Mr. Brown's start was in gospel, after a stint in reform school. His music was defined by pulsing beats and high-powered rhythms. Some of his hits offered timely messages, such as "Say It Loud - I'm Black and I'm Proud"; others, like "I Got You (I Feel Good)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Collier and By Michael Collier,Special to the Sun | May 19, 2002
For more than three decades, Carl Dennis has been writing quiet, intelligent and accessible poems about what it means to live in our faith-challenged age. Dennis has taught for many years at the State University of New York, Buffalo, and also teaches in the MFA program for writers at Warren Wilson College in Asheville, N.C. Last month, he received the Pulitzer Prize for poetry for his eighth book, Practical Gods. The voice of a Carl Dennis poem is calm, congenial, self-aware but not self-obsessed.
SPORTS
By Shaun Powell and Shaun Powell,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 6, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- Whether he grabs a rebound and makes like a migrating wildebeest downcourt, or bursts into the locker room to dress up himself and dress down anyone he chooses, it's all the same with Charles Barkley.Because, in any situation, Barkley is like Christmas. You know he's coming.You know he's coming because Barkley's arrivals are not trumpeted. They are bullhorned.On this day, the Philadelphia 76ers' forward, a four-time All-Star who is on another MVP pace, opens the locker-room door and the fun begins.
NEWS
December 27, 2006
He was known as the "godfather of soul," among other titles, but James Brown, the legendary singer and showman who died Christmas day at the age of 73, was more than a soul or rhythm and blues artist. He was an edgy, flashy performer with crossover appeal and extensive musical influence. Mr. Brown's start was in gospel, after a stint in reform school. His music was defined by pulsing beats and high-powered rhythms. Some of his hits offered timely messages, such as "Say It Loud - I'm Black and I'm Proud"; others, like "I Got You (I Feel Good)
NEWS
By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,Chicago Tribune | December 26, 2006
James Brown was more than a soul-music giant. He was a visionary. The world dances today to the sound of his drum, and in James Brown's universe every instrument was a drum. Mr. Brown died yesterday at 73 of heart failure in Atlanta after being taken to Emory Crawford Long Hospital with pneumonia. Whereas legendary peers such as the Beatles, Elvis Presley and even Bob Dylan have been transformed from counterculture rebels into cuddly icons, Mr. Brown leaves a pricklier legacy. "Said to be singularly `raw,' `uninhibited,' `possessed,' he became the mysterious, exotic black Other of colonialist fantasy," wrote Bruce Tucker in his introduction to the singer's autobiography, James Brown: The Godfather of Soul.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2005
Randy Hymes has heard the comparisons and he pays them no mind. The tights, the one-handed catches, the jawing with cornerbacks, and the end zone celebrations - all staples of Hymes' play during the Ravens' offseason practices - have led a few teammates to jokingly evoke a name he wants no ties to. But the question, considering Hymes' extreme makeover, is fair. Could he be turning into a less controversial version of Terrell Owens? "I don't want to be like T.O.," Hymes said. "I'm far different from him. He's in a whole other category.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 29, 2005
Director Ron Howard and writer Akiva Goldsman have made a specialty of taking chaotic lives and crafting them into sleek and tidy biopics. The team that gave us A Beautiful Mind and now Cinderella Man (opening Friday) have studied the melodramas of Hollywood's Golden Age and realized that audiences respond to clear, decisive lines of action and the calculated release of tension and emotion. These filmmakers know that what they may lose in revelation or insight they gain in pop catharsis and applause.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2004
The Ravens are banking that Deion Sanders creates more of a spark on the field than he did at his first news conference. Known as one of the most lively and flamboyant athletes of his era, the unretired Pro Bowl cornerback was surprisingly as subdued as his attire - a white Ravens hat, a black T-shirt and a bulky gold chain - before a jam-packed room of cameras and reporters yesterday. His answers were sometimes short and bristly. His trademark smile was flashed only a few times. Maybe it was a lack of sleep.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 8, 2004
ON THE DAY of his first presidential inauguration, Ronald Reagan invited the whole country into his new White House digs, in a way we had never gone there before. We were accustomed to Jimmy Carter, in his cardigan sweaters, fretting gloomily over America's malaise during our long national winter. Now we had Reagan all dressed up like New Year's Eve, lifting a glass of champagne and inviting everybody to drink along with him. Some of us watched this on a TV screen in a little downtown lunchroom, barely pausing between sandwiches and gossip to listen to Reagan's address.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | June 23, 1995
Ladies and gentlemen, if you would give your undivided attention to the center ring, please.Presenting Mr. P. T. Barnum, showman extraordinarie, dreamer, schemer, patriot, newspaper editor and politician, in "Barnum," the play.The story of one of America's most colorful characters arrives on stage Thursday when Theatre on the Hill opens for its 13th season on the main stage of Alumni Hall on the Western Maryland College campus."He was the ultimate showman, he wrote the book on showmanship," said Ray Ficca, who plays Barnum.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 7, 1992
He'd wanted it for years. He maneuvered and schmoozed an cadged and hustled, and now, at last, he was exactly where he wanted to be, about to start doing exactly what he wanted to be doing, and he and he alone had exclusive rights.His response?"Despair," says David Thomson, 51, the author of the just published and brilliantly received biography of legendary movie producer David O. Selznick, "Showman."For what lay ahead of Mr. Thomson was 57,000 pounds of paper -- possibly the largest collection of Hollywood documents in the world, which painstakingly traced the life and times of the maker of "Gone With the Wind."
NEWS
By Deitrich Curry and Deitrich Curry,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2003
With microphone in hand, Bruce Simpers began a call to the four couples forming a square in Catonsville Senior Center. "Bow to your partner," he sang out. "Now bow to your corner." The participants in the Summer Casual Square Dancing Club obediently faced each other, bowed and bowed once again to the person on their other side. Then, they eagerly waited for the next command from Simpers, a square dance veteran who has called out steps for two decades to groups ranging from Scouts to seniors.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 15, 2003
PARIS - When the French foreign minister ended his speech yesterday to the United Nations Security Council and was rewarded with applause, many people who have watched his career half expected him to stand up, flip his head of ample hair backward, stretch his arms fully and take a deep bow. Foreign Minister Dominique de Villepin, who has become a household face in America if not a household name, has long been a showman in French politics. He is as famous for his energetic temper as for his suave looks and lyrical style of speaking, and, according to French observers, has never failed to stop in his tracks when he sees a television camera.
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