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By Diane Holloway and Diane Holloway,COX NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 2003
Biff Henderson's evolution from stage manager to star began one morning in 1980, when David Letterman was in the midst of his own transformation from wise-cracking comic to talk show host. NBC had the gap-toothed guy, a favorite guest on Johnny Carson's Tonight Show, working as host of a morning show, which was a strange place for Letterman's late-night sense of humor. (This was the show on which Letterman set fire to the stage.) Henderson was stage managing in the wings when Letterman, on his way to do the monologue, suddenly pushed the startled stage manager toward the spotlight.
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By Los Angeles Times | April 1, 2009
Series Scrubs:: When the moon is full, things turn crazy for the hospital staff. (8 p.m., WMAR-Channel 2) American Idol: : Last season's winner, David Cook, returns to show the current contestants how it's done. Lady GaGa also performs. (9 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) Reno 911!: : Those daffy deputies return for another season of shenanigans. (10:30 p.m., Comedy Central) Specials I Get That a Lot: : Celebrities pretend to be everyday folks who are mistaken for the celebrities that they actually are. (8 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13)
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By Knight-Ridder Tribune | September 4, 1996
If you're sick of those pesky commercial interruptions during "Late Show With David Letterman," then CBS' one-time-only show with no commercial breaks is just for you.No date yet, but one night this month, Letterman's one-hour show will run without interruption, although there will be some mention, some way, of sponsors. (After all, they've got to get something for the money they're paying.)"We're going to go to four advertisers and for one night get some notoriety and some spin," said Joe Abruzzese, CBS' president of ad sales.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | February 6, 2009
Just in case you haven't encountered any of CBS' 10 million promotional messages, let me be the first to tell you this is Grammy weekend. Excess network hype aside, Sunday's telecast promises to be a good one. There are big-name performers for just about every pop musical taste. Miley Cyrus and Taylor Swift will be appearing together, as will Estelle and Kanye West. There will be a Four Tops tribute segment featuring Duke Fakir, an original member of the group, along with actor-musician Jamie Foxx and Ne-Yo.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | May 16, 1995
London -- There's something you've got to understand about television in Great Britain:It can never be too dull.Gardening is a prime-time hit in the land of four over-the-air TV stations. An antiques show is very big on Sundays. And besides scoreless soccer games and cricket matches that go on for days, British viewers adore something called snooker, a sport that combines the drama of pro bowling with the aerobic exertion of billiards. Naturally, it's played by guys in formal wear.One other thing: "Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman" outdraws "ER."
NEWS
March 23, 2007
CALVERT DEFOREST, 85 Letterman sidekick Calvert DeForest, the white-haired, bespectacled nebbish who gained cult status as the oddball Larry "Bud" Melman on David Letterman's late night television shows, died Monday in New York, Mr. Letterman's Late Show announced Wednesday. He made dozens of appearances on Mr. Letterman's shows from 1982 through 2002, handling a variety of twisted duties: dueting with Sonny Bono on "I Got You, Babe," doing a Mary Tyler Moore impression during a visit to Minneapolis and handing out hot towels to arrivals at the Port Authority Bus Terminal.
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By david zurawik and david zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | September 26, 2008
Biting comedy, award-winning reality TV and the start of a new season for a great family drama are available this weekend. CHRIS ROCK IS BACK TV comedy does not get much better than Chris Rock's HBO shows. Premium cable has the freedom not to bleep Rock, and that makes a difference. The language that some consider harsh is crucial to the biting edge that Rock brings to his keen social insights. (9 p.m. tomorrow, HBO) *** "THE AMAZING RACE" BEGINS AGAIN The reality show that keeps winning Emmys returns for a new season on CBS. (8 p.m. Sunday, CBS)
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By david zurawik and david zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
You can go with the usual Thursday night network mainstays, like NBC's The Office or ABC's Grey's Anatomy. Nothing wrong there. But if you are looking for something different, here are a couple of music-based productions. THE ROOTS OF THE MAN IN BLACK: This look at country singer Johnny Cash and the thematic currents of his music and life is first-rate film biography from two outstanding documentary filmmakers, Robert Gordon (Muddy Waters: Can't Be Satisfied) and Morgan Neville (Hank Williams: Honky Tonk Blues)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david. zurawik@baltsun.com | November 21, 2008
As one newsmagazine takes the high road, another goes low. Or, for every action, there is a reaction. As the CBS newsmagazine 60 Minutes scores record ratings with a steady diet of substance and interviews like the one correspondent Steve Kroft did on Sunday with President-elect Barack Obama, ABC's 20/20 tonight features an "exclusive" interview by Diane Sawyer with Ashley Dupre. She's the "high-end call girl" at the center of the scandal that brought down former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer.
NEWS
December 3, 2008
The most successful reality shows are those that connect with or exploit tensions in the larger society. If nothing else, Secret Millionaire, a new Fox series debuting tonight, certainly scores on that count. The series, which some Baltimore viewers have surely heard about because area resident Molly Shattuck is a participant, speaks to the nation's economic crisis and the social-class tensions connected with thoughts of who caused the problems and who will suffer most. The premise takes a millionaire out of his or her world of privilege each week and places each undercover in situations of economic distress and hardship.
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By DAVID ZURAWIK | February 4, 2009
Having a network anchorwoman serve as host of a prime-time entertainment program intended to promote a coming awards show on the same network is a formula that guarantees controversy. Is this not the blurring of entertainment and news? Doesn't this diminish the credibility of the anchorwoman - et cetera, et cetera, et cetera? Whatever the answer to those questions, CBS is featuring its anchorwoman, Katie Couric, tonight in Couric's All Access Grammy Special. Before you prejudge, you should know two things: First, Couric is very good in this type of entertainment-interview format.
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By DAVID ZURAWIK | January 30, 2009
Sunday Morning is turning 30, and the CBS mainstay is celebrating this weekend. If you have never seen the program - and sometimes it is the best thing on TV all weekend - think of it as an upbeat newsmagazine with a feel for humor and culture. Sunday, they will be looking at the way the world - including technology, popular culture and religion - has changed since the show made its debut three decades ago with Charles Kuralt as host. These days, it's the forever-in-bow ties Charles Osgood at the helm.
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By DAVID ZURAWIK | January 29, 2009
Ihave to admit that, at first, I wasn't a big fan of documentarian Alexandra Pelosi. I gave a positive review to her first film, the 2000 Emmy Award-winning HBO documentary Journeys with George, in which she followed then-presidential candidate George W. Bush on his campaign. It was an engaging and occasionally illuminating film, but I thought there was far too much of Pelosi in the final product, and I found her on-screen persona too cutesy. But after seeing The Trials of Ted Haggard, Pelosi's latest film, which premieres tonight on HBO, I believe in her talents.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | January 26, 2009
TNT is using its hit The Closer to serve as lead-in tonight to the premiere of Trust Me, a new series starring Eric McCormack and Tom Cavanagh. Trust me, there is almost nothing in this drama that works. The series is set in an ad agency with McCormack and Cavanaugh playing two best friends since childhood who now work together thinking up ads for products like cell phones. In the opening scenes, the two are shown mid-day stretched out at a pool, recovering from hangovers. They lie shamelessly about how hard they are working when the boss calls.
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By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | December 22, 2008
Apparently airing in the morning isn't enough. NBC's Today show is going prime-time, for tonight only at least. Matt Lauer, Meredith Vieira, Al Roker and Ann Curry host 2008: Today Looks Back, A Holiday Special, a one-hour review of the year's biggest news events. It won't be strictly serious; the show will include big moments in pop culture and Today show bloopers. It's the first time they've tried something like this in more than a decade. "It was such an incredible year, with the economy and the election and the Olympics, just for starters," executive producer Jim Bell told The Hollywood Reporter.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | December 11, 2008
He works in what must be the darkest office on the planet. On a weekly basis, he is knee-deep in body parts. And those are the good parts of the job. Why on earth would a guy want to leave? Nevertheless, Gil Grissom (William Peterson) is leaving the building on CSI: Crime Scene Investigation tonight at 9 on CBS. Not exactly forever - he'll dip back into the forensic fun once in a while (my guess: during ratings sweeps weeks when the body parts really start dropping). But he's handing the forceps over to a successor in a two-part episode that begins tonight.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | January 26, 2009
TNT is using its hit The Closer to serve as lead-in tonight to the premiere of Trust Me, a new series starring Eric McCormack and Tom Cavanagh. Trust me, there is almost nothing in this drama that works. The series is set in an ad agency with McCormack and Cavanaugh playing two best friends since childhood who now work together thinking up ads for products like cell phones. In the opening scenes, the two are shown mid-day stretched out at a pool, recovering from hangovers. They lie shamelessly about how hard they are working when the boss calls.
NEWS
By david zurawik and david zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | November 12, 2008
After all the drama and importance of watching the presidential campaign play out on TV in recent months, I felt like it might be a long, long time before I could ever get hooked on a reality TV series again. But now comes the season premiere of Top Chef, and I love it. Everybody in Baltimore has by now seen at least five stories or items about Jill Snyder, executive chef of Red Maple and one of 17 contestants this season. I will give away nothing about how she fares in tonight's episode.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,David.Zurawik@baltsun.com | December 10, 2008
First of all, let me tell what is not on tonight, so you can plan your viewing accordingly. While the Fox reality show, Secret Millionaire, returns for its second week, the segment featuring Baltimore's Molly Shattuck will not air until Dec. 17, according to a Fox spokesman. Executive producer Greg Goldman had told The Baltimore Sun that he thought the Shattuck episode would air this week, but viewers will just have to wait. This is the show that features millionaires going undercover to spend a week with people from less-privileged backgrounds, and them giving at least $100,000 to one of the people they meet.
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