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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
Bryan Nehman, co-host of the "Brian and Bryan Show" on Washington's WMAL radio, has been hired by Baltimore's WBAL to replace Dave Durian during morning drive time. Nehman previously anchored morning news on the politically conservative talk and news station in the nation's capital from 2001 to 2011. He's been at the station 12 years. He started as a street reporter, and "was put in the news anchor chair right after 9/11," Nehman said Thursday. "Bryan is one of the brightest young men that I've met, and he is the guy who's going to lead WBAL into the next 20 years of broadcasting," Dave Hill, program director at the station said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Don Scott announced that he's retiring from WJZ-TV July 12. "ICYMI -- I'll be retiring from WJZ/CBS after 40 years and on July 12th this year," Scott wrote on Twitter last week. "Thank you for four decades of your support @cbsbaltimore. " Jay Newman , general manager of WJZ, sent the following message to staff after Scott's announcement: As some of you already know Don Scott will be retiring later this year. I want to take this opportunity to personally thank Don for all his many, many contributions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
If you have ever spilled a cup of coffee onto your computer keyboard, you need to listen to this recording of 98 Rock's morning team as it reacts to Mickey Cucchiella after he knocked a cup of coffee onto the console in the station's studio Friday morning. The station was off the air for 20 minutes, according to the show hosts. I called Dave Hill, program director for 98 Rock and WBAL-AM, Friday afternoon about 3 p.m. in connection with another story -- WBAL's coverage of two big trials this week.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Do you have the charisma of Oprah, the peppiness of Katie Couric and the wit of Letterman? Ok, um.... well, do you at least have the Mr. Rogers' knack for popping in businesses with his television neighbor? The city's local access cable channel is looking for you. Channel 25 has just been rebranded as CharmTV and is working on a roster of more interesting shows with the help of nationally-recognized producers. Those producers are seeking a host for a show called "Born in Baltimore," who will walk viewers through businesses that were founded in the city.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | February 10, 1993
Maryland's nimble 7th District congressman, Kweisi Mfume, has figured out one way to handle talk show democracy.Join it.L Move over Rush, Montel, Phil and Oprah, make way for Kweisi.Mr. Mfume now presides over "The Bottom Line," an issues-oriented television program featuring a panel of experts and a participatory, in-studio audience of 80 or so.In his first four outings, Mr. Mfume has tackled topics such as guns, abortion, and the contraceptive Norplant and its use among teen-agers.The show, which airs at 11 a.m. Sundays, is watched by about 50,000 Baltimore-area viewers, says WBAL-TV producer Terry Todesco.
NEWS
June 6, 1991
Services for Kathryne H. "Kitty" Broady, a gospel radio show host who was active in community affairs, will be held at noon today at the Union Baptist Church, 1219 Druid Hill Ave.Mrs. Broady, who was 76, was found Thursday night overcome by smoke in the second-floor bedroom of her home in the 3700 block of Liberty Heights Avenue. Other tenants in the house escaped after the back porch was apparently set on fire.For the past three years, she had an afternoon show on WBGR-AM. Earlier in her more than 25 years in the Baltimore area, she broadcast gospel shows on WEBB and WCBM in Baltimore and WANN in Annapolis.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | March 5, 2003
Now, from the nation's top-rated, toughest-talking, highest-decibel cable news station, comes a new hour-long show from one of the country's least threatening people: game--show host Pat Sajak. Pat Sajak Weekend premiered Sunday night at 9 on the Fox News Channel, with talk show host Regis Philbin and comedian Robert Klein as guests. At 56, Sajak's cherubic cheeks may seem a bit thinner and his graying hair a little pouffier, but he still has his youthful charm and energy. Sajak, a former local television weather forecaster known best as the long-time host of Wheel of Fortune, says he hopes to create a place of respite each week for people exhausted by the news.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
Fox News Friday afternoon acknowledged showing a man committing suicide on-air despite the channel being on a five-second delay that should have allowed producers to cut away. Here's video of show host Shepard Smith trying to explain what happened. I am not sure there is an explanation for this kind of gatekeeping ineptitude. Unless it's that channels like Fox that masquerade as news operations make no real commitment to being responsible gatekeepers. So, when called on to actually cover news in a responsible manner, they regularly fall short.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | October 9, 2001
Conservative radio show host Rush Limbaugh revealed yesterday that he's functionally deaf, and that he expects to lose all capacity to hear within a few months. "At that point, a decision has to be made as to what to do about it," Limbaugh told listeners yesterday, according to a transcript. "My desire is to continue doing this [show], and there are an infinite number of ways of continuing." In his statement, a mixture of vulnerability and classically Limbaughian bravado, the host acknowledged that he had not heard a single word spoken by callers on yesterday's broadcast.
NEWS
November 25, 2011
H.L. Mencken once observed that newspapers, by nature, are bellicose and do not speak in support of anyone or anything unless they absolutely can't help it. There are any number of public figures in Maryland and beyond who would attest to this. But on rare occasion, we have the good fortune to encounter someone who merits words of praise, and so exceptions have to be made. To leave such thoughts to obituary writers alone would, at the very least, deny the living the potentially defibrillating shock of reading them in this forum.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 1, 2014
Anyone in the news business will tell you that a side benefit is the diverse number of people one gets to meet. Jay Leno, who leaves "The Tonight Show" on Feb 6 after a 22-year run (retire is not the right word in his case), is one such person. The circumstances surrounding our first meeting involved a column I wrote 15 years ago in support of his wife's activism on behalf of Afghan women. Jay and Mavis Leno invited my wife and me for a visit. Things progressed from there.
SPORTS
By Derek Wattay, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
Since opening the Annapolis School of Seamanship in 2002, Capt. John Martino has sought to educate and empower boaters of all skill levels with the knowledge and dexterity necessary to be self-sufficient on the water. "There's not a whole lot of formal training out there," said Martino, whose school instructs students from all over North America. "We offer skills you can't find anywhere else. " He'll be offering much of that guidance during a three-hour "Women at the Wheel" workshop Jan. 25 at the Baltimore Boat Show at the Baltimore Convention Center.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | December 5, 2013
I like capitalism. Specifically, I like the idea that if I write a better book, have a better idea, build a better mousetrap, I will be rewarded accordingly. A system where everyone gets the same reward regardless of quality or quantity of work is inconsistent with excellence and innovation, as the mediocrity and inefficiency that beset the Soviet Union readily proves. The woman who is successful under capitalism gets to eat steak and lobster whenever she wants. That's never bothered me. What does bother me is the notion that the unsuccessful man who lacks that woman's talent, resources, opportunities or luck should not get to eat at all. There is something obscene in the notion that a person can work full time for a multinational corporation and earn not enough to keep a roof over his head or food on his table.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2013
I wasn't there for the 7 a.m. start, but I've seen almost all of the NFL Network's Super Bowl Sunday pre-game coverage. And as of 1 p.m. (EST), I am here to tell you it is outstanding. Warren Sapp, elected into the Hall of Fame Saturday, brought even more energy and joy than usual to the telecast. He was inspired. Michael Irvin was stoked to Super Bowl level, and Steve Mariucci was better than he has ever been. Deion Sanders: superb. Melissa Stark: through the roof in poise, knowledge and the 10,000 skills a show host needs to make a TV conversation seem like the easiest and most natural thing in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Chris Hayes, an editor at large of The Nation and host of the talk show bearing his name on MSNBC, was raised in a working-class neighborhood but attended some of the most exclusive schools on the planet. "I grew up in the Bronx," says the affable, 33-year-old anchor of "Up With Chris Hayes. " "My mother was the daughter of an Italian deli owner. But I'm also hugely a product of the meritocracy, and for that reason I have my own affection for it. " Both experiences provided fodder for his much-discussed first book, "Twilight of the Elites: America after Meritocracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
The partisan media madness started early Tuesday on the "Fox & Friends" morning show with host Steve Doocy somehow turning a report on midnight voting in Dixville Notch, N.H., into an attack on President Barack Obama for his handling of the September attack on an American consulate in Benghazi, Libya. "Appalling" was the word U.S. Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.) used to describe the president's behavior. And, with Doocy priming the pump of vitriol, she was only warming up. Meanwhile, on the other side, former Democratic National Party chair Howard Dean was on MSNBC's "Morning Joe" minutes after the polls opened in Pennsylvania, already alleging voter suppression in Philadelphia based on hearsay.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2004
What do swimming pigs and pregnant cows have in common with conservative talk show host Sean Hannity? Possibly not that much - but all will be on hand at this year's Maryland State Fair. This year's schedule promises a clutch of quirky and surprising events - most tied to agriculture but others rooted in popular culture. "In the traditional fair, you think about games and rides and food," said Andy Cashman, a fair organizer. "I think people come and expect to see some neat and different ideas."
FEATURES
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1998
For one night, Jerry Springer tried not to be "Jerry Springer" -- ringmaster and purveyor of television's most talked about daytime smut-show where guests slug it out instead of talk it out.He was looking to be thoughtful and insightful and to seriously explore how the media mirror society as part of a lecture symposium at Johns Hopkins University.But when he walked onto the stage Friday night, he was laughed at.Several hundred hooting students, who until then had been amusing themselves by sailing paper airplanes through the auditorium, burst into wild applause.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
Fox News Friday afternoon acknowledged showing a man committing suicide on-air despite the channel being on a five-second delay that should have allowed producers to cut away. Here's video of show host Shepard Smith trying to explain what happened. I am not sure there is an explanation for this kind of gatekeeping ineptitude. Unless it's that channels like Fox that masquerade as news operations make no real commitment to being responsible gatekeepers. So, when called on to actually cover news in a responsible manner, they regularly fall short.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
Bryan Nehman, co-host of the "Brian and Bryan Show" on Washington's WMAL radio, has been hired by Baltimore's WBAL to replace Dave Durian during morning drive time. Nehman previously anchored morning news on the politically conservative talk and news station in the nation's capital from 2001 to 2011. He's been at the station 12 years. He started as a street reporter, and "was put in the news anchor chair right after 9/11," Nehman said Thursday. "Bryan is one of the brightest young men that I've met, and he is the guy who's going to lead WBAL into the next 20 years of broadcasting," Dave Hill, program director at the station said.
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