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By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Buck Showalter means business. As manager of the Orioles, Showalter has brought a shot of mojo to a moribund baseball team, thanks in no small part to his grim determination to win. In photos, his facial expressions usually range from "quasi-stern" to "full-on scowl. " But Showalter, 56, does have a soft side for Sader, Webster, Jasper and Opie - four floppy-eared basset hounds he and his wife, Angela, shuttle between their countryside home in northern Baltimore County and their off-season house in Texas.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Frances G. "Gerry" Mayes, a dog trainer who also showed dogs, died Aug. 4 of cancer at her Essex home. She was 71. The daughter of Alexander P. Studzinski, supervisor of Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Penwood power plant, and Frances R. Jednoralski Studzinski, a homemaker, Frances Geraldine Studzinski was born in Baltimore and raised in Dundalk. After graduating in 1960 from Dundalk High School, she attended Baltimore Business College for a year and then went to work as an accountant at the Monumental Life Insurance Co. She and James Mayes, her high school sweetheart, married in 1961.
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FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Nathan, the floppy- jowled , big-eared, giant Bloodhound from Maryland who arguably drew the loudest cheers at this year's Westminster Kennel Club show, almost never made it out to compete. “I thought about not even showing Nathan,” says his co-owner and handler Heather Helmer , who owns and operates Skipton Farms boarding kennel in Queenstown with husband, Zack. “But his other owner called and said she was coming and wanted to watch her dog, so I decided to show him.” Lucky for everyone involved: Nathan won the hound group at the show and came very close to taking Best in Show, where he was a clear audience favorite.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Nathan, the floppy- jowled , big-eared, giant Bloodhound from Maryland who arguably drew the loudest cheers at this year's Westminster Kennel Club show, almost never made it out to compete. “I thought about not even showing Nathan,” says his co-owner and handler Heather Helmer , who owns and operates Skipton Farms boarding kennel in Queenstown with husband, Zack. “But his other owner called and said she was coming and wanted to watch her dog, so I decided to show him.” Lucky for everyone involved: Nathan won the hound group at the show and came very close to taking Best in Show, where he was a clear audience favorite.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 22, 2007
PBS' Nature series starts an absurdly adorable two-parter tonight called "Dogs That Changed the World." This is the story of where our best animal friends came from. Nature calls it "the most breathtaking evolutionary leap ever made," and one that changed human life in just 15,000 years. DOGS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD / / 8 p.m. tonight and April 29 -- WETA (Channel 26) -- Tonight's episode also airs at 7 p.m. on MPT (Channels 22 and 67)
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | October 10, 1992
My veterinarian doesn't do ear crops. He doesn't even know how to perform the surgery and has absolutely no interest in learning.There are a lot of vets like him, so many that the American Veterinary Medical Association now supports the banning of dogs with cropped ears from the show ring, holding that the surgery is purely cosmetic.Some breeders disagree, arguing that ear-cropping is preventive medicine, reducing the ear infections common to some floppy-eared dogs. At a recent delegates meeting of the American Kennel Club, a representative of the American Bouvier des Flandres Club commented on the benefits of the surgery:"A number of veterinarians comment on the improved temperament of long-eared breeds once chronic ear infections are managed," said Jeannette Niedler.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | February 26, 1994
I always feel sorry for the poodles, especially the big ones, the standards. Such wonderful animals, strong and clever, with as good a sense of humor as any dog you'll ever meet.Yet here they are, at the prestigious Westminster Kennel Club dog show in New York, with their bare fannies catching the drafts on the floor of Madison Square Garden. The butt, if you'll excuse me, of jokes erupting in living rooms and newspaper columns from coast to coast.Moments before the Best In Show finale, I stood not more than two yards away from the show's top poodle, Ch. La Marka Nina Oscura, and looked closely not at that shaved rump, or at the waves of black furcascading over her shoulders, or even at the puffs of fur on her legs and tail, but at her eyes, clear and intelligent, looking up at her handler with love.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Frances G. "Gerry" Mayes, a dog trainer who also showed dogs, died Aug. 4 of cancer at her Essex home. She was 71. The daughter of Alexander P. Studzinski, supervisor of Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Penwood power plant, and Frances R. Jednoralski Studzinski, a homemaker, Frances Geraldine Studzinski was born in Baltimore and raised in Dundalk. After graduating in 1960 from Dundalk High School, she attended Baltimore Business College for a year and then went to work as an accountant at the Monumental Life Insurance Co. She and James Mayes, her high school sweetheart, married in 1961.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
Pit bulls are inherently dangerous animals, the state's highest court has ruled, a decision that could lead to stiff penalties for people found responsible in attacks — even if the dogs have never been violent before. A decision by the Maryland Court of Appeals, issued this week, distinguishes pit bulls and mixed breeds from other kinds of dogs. In the past, a victim intending to file a lawsuit after a dog attack had to prove that a dog's owner knew it had a history of being dangerous.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1996
At this time of year, Grace and Tony Mazzuca usually are traveling up and down the East Coast on the dog show circuit with their two Siberian huskies, Gus and Kristal.But this spring, the Hampstead couple is at home, wondering who could have shot and killed their cherished show dogs.The bodies of the two dogs were found April 3 on the lawn of a home near Sullivan Road -- Gus shot twice in the head at close range, and Kristal with one gunshot in the back of the neck."Between my husband and me, I don't know who's in worse shape," Mrs. Mazzuca said.
SPORTS
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Buck Showalter means business. As manager of the Orioles, Showalter has brought a shot of mojo to a moribund baseball team, thanks in no small part to his grim determination to win. In photos, his facial expressions usually range from "quasi-stern" to "full-on scowl. " But Showalter, 56, does have a soft side for Sader, Webster, Jasper and Opie - four floppy-eared basset hounds he and his wife, Angela, shuttle between their countryside home in northern Baltimore County and their off-season house in Texas.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
Pit bulls are inherently dangerous animals, the state's highest court has ruled, a decision that could lead to stiff penalties for people found responsible in attacks — even if the dogs have never been violent before. A decision by the Maryland Court of Appeals, issued this week, distinguishes pit bulls and mixed breeds from other kinds of dogs. In the past, a victim intending to file a lawsuit after a dog attack had to prove that a dog's owner knew it had a history of being dangerous.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | April 22, 2007
PBS' Nature series starts an absurdly adorable two-parter tonight called "Dogs That Changed the World." This is the story of where our best animal friends came from. Nature calls it "the most breathtaking evolutionary leap ever made," and one that changed human life in just 15,000 years. DOGS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD / / 8 p.m. tonight and April 29 -- WETA (Channel 26) -- Tonight's episode also airs at 7 p.m. on MPT (Channels 22 and 67)
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2005
It took more than an hour of meticulous brushing, styling and blow-drying - and a little last-minute shaving - to get Marlene ready for her big moment. The intensive grooming paid off: The cocker spaniel from France was named the best female in her round during competition at the Maryland Kennel Club's 93rd All Breed Dog Show yesterday. More than 1,800 dogs competed. The top honor - Best in Show - went to Garbh Aerie of Eagle, an Irish wolfhound. The dogs competed in 12 rings against others of the same breed and age. More than 140 breeds were represented.
NEWS
By Lani Harac and Lani Harac,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2001
Big dogs, teeny dogs and in-betweeny dogs ran around the patio of the Loews Annapolis Hotel, sat in the nearby lounge and wolfed down gourmet fare, more extensive even than the continental breakfast buffet set up for their humans. Guido, a beefy Labrador in green Mardi Gras beads, ate leftovers from every bowl he passed. Finn and Grady, elegant Gordon setters, edged back as Lilly, a young boxer, came over to investigate. Boomer plowed through the crowd, as St. Bernards are wont to do. Five-month-old Rottweiler Rocky just lay down and took it all in, a Harley-Davidson collar belying his attitude.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1996
At this time of year, Grace and Tony Mazzuca usually are traveling up and down the East Coast on the dog show circuit with their two Siberian huskies, Gus and Kristal.But this spring, the Hampstead couple is at home, wondering who could have shot and killed their cherished show dogs.The bodies of the two dogs were found April 3 on the lawn of a home near Sullivan Road -- Gus shot twice in the head at close range, and Kristal with one gunshot in the back of the neck."Between my husband and me, I don't know who's in worse shape," Mrs. Mazzuca said.
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2005
It took more than an hour of meticulous brushing, styling and blow-drying - and a little last-minute shaving - to get Marlene ready for her big moment. The intensive grooming paid off: The cocker spaniel from France was named the best female in her round during competition at the Maryland Kennel Club's 93rd All Breed Dog Show yesterday. More than 1,800 dogs competed. The top honor - Best in Show - went to Garbh Aerie of Eagle, an Irish wolfhound. The dogs competed in 12 rings against others of the same breed and age. More than 140 breeds were represented.
NEWS
By Lani Harac and Lani Harac,SUN STAFF | June 24, 2001
Big dogs, teeny dogs and in-betweeny dogs ran around the patio of the Loews Annapolis Hotel, sat in the nearby lounge and wolfed down gourmet fare, more extensive even than the continental breakfast buffet set up for their humans. Guido, a beefy Labrador in green Mardi Gras beads, ate leftovers from every bowl he passed. Finn and Grady, elegant Gordon setters, edged back as Lilly, a young boxer, came over to investigate. Boomer plowed through the crowd, as St. Bernards are wont to do. Five-month-old Rottweiler Rocky just lay down and took it all in, a Harley-Davidson collar belying his attitude.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | February 26, 1994
I always feel sorry for the poodles, especially the big ones, the standards. Such wonderful animals, strong and clever, with as good a sense of humor as any dog you'll ever meet.Yet here they are, at the prestigious Westminster Kennel Club dog show in New York, with their bare fannies catching the drafts on the floor of Madison Square Garden. The butt, if you'll excuse me, of jokes erupting in living rooms and newspaper columns from coast to coast.Moments before the Best In Show finale, I stood not more than two yards away from the show's top poodle, Ch. La Marka Nina Oscura, and looked closely not at that shaved rump, or at the waves of black furcascading over her shoulders, or even at the puffs of fur on her legs and tail, but at her eyes, clear and intelligent, looking up at her handler with love.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | October 10, 1992
My veterinarian doesn't do ear crops. He doesn't even know how to perform the surgery and has absolutely no interest in learning.There are a lot of vets like him, so many that the American Veterinary Medical Association now supports the banning of dogs with cropped ears from the show ring, holding that the surgery is purely cosmetic.Some breeders disagree, arguing that ear-cropping is preventive medicine, reducing the ear infections common to some floppy-eared dogs. At a recent delegates meeting of the American Kennel Club, a representative of the American Bouvier des Flandres Club commented on the benefits of the surgery:"A number of veterinarians comment on the improved temperament of long-eared breeds once chronic ear infections are managed," said Jeannette Niedler.
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