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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 29, 2001
WASHINGTON - It's not only out of the mouths of babes that the truth often comes. This month, Treasury Secretary Paul H. O'Neill blurted out that part of the $100 billion economic stimulus package approved in a partisan vote by the Republican-controlled House Ways and Means Committee was "show business." He had it exactly right. It was evident from the start that the Republicans, mindful that the Democrats control the Senate, were putting forward a bargaining position with plenty of fat in it to withstand the carving knife they knew the Democrats would apply when the new tax-cut bill reached the other side of the Capitol.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Sixty-three years ago this week - at 9 p.m. Oct. 15, 1951 - TV viewers got their first look at a situation comedy on CBS that, in short order, would become part of the country's cultural DNA. The focal point of the show was the redheaded title character, Lucy Ricardo (even in black and white, you could somehow tell the color of her hair); her Cuban-born husband, Ricky, leader of a dance band at a New York club; and their best friends, Fred and Ethel Mertz, landlords of the brownstone apartment building on the Upper East Side where they all laughed, loved, fought and schemed.
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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1994
For sale: A place that never gets dull.After nine years, the Theatre Shop in Westminster is looking for a new owner."This doesn't mean we're going out of business," said owner Carol Fearns, who helped the West Main Street shop that specializes in dance and theater supplies expand into an entertainment company. "This is a chance of a lifetime. There's never a dull moment."Ms. Fearns and actors associated with the business create a variety of productions from murder mystery weekends for business conventions to Santa Claus and Easter Bunny arrivals in malls as far away as Lancaster, Pa.But Ms. Fearns said she now wants a chance at a business career and more time with her family.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
For most of us, getting out of a tight situation means pulling the car out of a Canton parking spot or wriggling out of a size 2 dress.  But Baltimore magician Spencer Horsman often quite literally finds himself in a bind. Horsman will be featured on the show "Masters of Illusion" on the CW, according to a news release. The 27-year-old will escape from "the flaming jaws of death" and will emerge from shackles and an underwater tank in episodes 1 and 3 of the show. The premiere episode airs 8 p.m. Aug. 1. Horsman grew up in show business.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 29, 1992
MIAMI -- Retirement didn't sit well with Molly and Lady. A life of leisure in their pen at Key Largo's exclusive Ocean Reef Club just couldn't match the excitement of their show business career.So they high-tailed it out of there and took 8-year-old Bacall with them. Now they're making a come back -- three shows a day at the Links at Key Biscayne."They seem to be coming up at 10, 12 and 5 o'clock. That's exactly their show schedule," said Rick Trout, Ocean Reef's senior dolphin trainer, who cares for Molly, Lady and Bacall.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | September 12, 1990
By 11 a.m., George Burns is sitting in his Hollywood office schmoozing on the phone and finishing off cigar No. 3.He's just nixed an offer to work with Bob Hope in Australia for five weeks. "Too tough," he explains. "I'm 94. I faint twice a day, sometimes three times a day."A long pause, then the gravelly, smoke-filled voice breaks into laughter. Although he lacks a stage and a large audience, the elder statesman of comedy can't help but turn a phone conversation into a jokefest.On being interviewed: "It's very nice to be 94 years old and get out of bed to be interviewed.
TRAVEL
By Aaron Barnhart and Aaron Barnhart,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 19, 1999
It has been said at times that Hollywood lacks a conscience, but what strikes me in my day-to-day dealings with the entertainment world is how sorely it lacks a memory.Show business is a forgetting industry, a reflection of our forward-looking, amnesiac culture. It places a high premium on youth, who are notoriously ignorant of their past. When Hollywood does look back, it usually lays on the nostalgia so thick you could slice it with a negative cutter -- not that anyone who works in a digital editing suite today remembers one of those.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
A decade after graduating from Baltimore's Gilman School, some alumni might be vaulting up the ladder in careers as executives or politicians. But Brian Sher, Class of '86, was looking at the lowest rung - starting out as a trainee in the mailroom of a Hollywood talent agency. After attending Tulane and the University of Southern California, Sher had tried doing most of the things young people do to break into show business: working as production assistant on a movie, playing a walk-on character and writing a screenplay.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | November 12, 1990
Remember "In the Beginning"?"Hello, Larry" ring any bells?If not, not to worry. Even McLean Stevenson, the man who lived through them, prefers to forget many of the ill-conceived sitcoms he's starred in since leaving "M*A*S*H" 15 years ago."I did some terrible shows," he says. "But nobody made me do it. I did everything by choice. I love working."Which brings up the question: What exactly has life after "M*A*S*H" been like for the 59-year-old actor?Ask Mr. Stevenson that on a rainy Saturday and he not so much answers as recounts his life in show business.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | October 18, 1993
KATHERINE Ann Power, the '60s revolutionary who recently turned herself in, has been sentenced to eight to 12 years in prison for her role in killing a policeman. The punishment has had a chilling effect on show business because Judge Robert Banks told her, "I enjoin you and prohibit you from any activity of any nature which can generate profit to you for the crimes you committed."Literary agents, book publishers, TV and film producers could not believe that a judge would interfere in the biggest growth industry in the country today -- cashing in on heinous crimes committed by heinous people.
NEWS
By Tony Glaros | July 4, 2014
When I spoke to Liz Cassedy during the height of our freezing polar vortex this winter, it was like twisting the cap off a bottle of sparkling Champagne. Her effervescent, adventurous spirit was the balm I needed for my annual unwanted visitor: Seasonal Affective Disorder. Liz helps you see in the dark. Liz, 25, a Reservoir High grad, took the plunge a while back and moved to Hollywood to pursue her dream of being in show business. During our talk, she was blunt about her travails.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Here's a first look at Josh Charles talking to David Letterman about the death of his character, Will Gardner, on "The Good Wife. " The appearance, which will air at 11:35 p.m. Monday, was taped earlier in the day. Letterman:  “What the hell happened?” Charles: “What an intro!”  (audience laughs) Letterman:  “You got killed off!”  Charles:  “That's what you gotta do to get on the Letterman show.  I had to do that, I had to get killed off to get on your show.” Letterman:  “Now, you knew this was going to happen?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
A decade after graduating from Baltimore's Gilman School, some alumni might be vaulting up the ladder in careers as executives or politicians. But Brian Sher, Class of '86, was looking at the lowest rung - starting out as a trainee in the mailroom of a Hollywood talent agency. After attending Tulane and the University of Southern California, Sher had tried doing most of the things young people do to break into show business: working as production assistant on a movie, playing a walk-on character and writing a screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | February 8, 2012
Welcome to the Adele show. Just as she dominated radio this past year, Adele will likely walk away with a handful of shiny gramophones on Sunday night (8 p.m., WJZ/CBS). But this is show business - there are no guarantees (except that host LL Cool J will make us cringe at least 12 times). There will be performances, of course - Bruce Springsteen, Paul McCartney, Nicki Minaj and even Adele, taking a stage for the first time since vocal cord surgery. And then there are the awards. Check out our breakdown of the four major categories, including predictions on who should and will win. Album of the Year Adele, "21" Foo Fighters, "Wasting Light" Lady Gaga,"Born This Way" Bruno Mars, "Doo-Wops & Holligans" Rihanna, "Loud" Will win: Adele, "21" Should win: How did Kanye West get shut out from this category?
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
Gilbert David is working on a comeback in show business. This octogenarian wants one more shot at the limelight. He feels certain some locals might recall him as "Mr. Fitness," a frequent guest on local TV shows 30 or more years ago. His neighbors in Northwest Baltimore still greet him with the stage name used when he chatted it up with Elane Stein and with Oprah Winfrey, when she co-hosted a talk show with Richard Sher on WJZ. "I know she would...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 7, 2010
In June 1969, I dug deep for $5 and bought a Mechanic Theatre orchestra seat to see Baltimore's own Anita Gillette advise her audience to "Don't Tell Mama" in the hit musical "Caberet." It was her professional debut here. R.H. Gardner, The Baltimore Sun's critic, gushed in his morning-after review: "Every girl, on leaving home to seek a career in show business, dreams of returning in a blaze of glory. Last night, Anita Gillette did." Four decades later, Gillette is still on the stage, and TV too, as she was Thursday night on NBC's "30 Rock."
NEWS
By Gregg Kilday and Gregg Kilday,L.A. Times | July 30, 1995
"The Agency: William Morris and the Hidden History of Show Business," by Frank Rose. HarperBusiness. 416 pages. $30 This book ultimately reads like a melodramatic remake of "The Bad and the Beautiful."Mr. Rose tries to cover so much territory that the reader has to rush to keep up. And in an effort to sketch in the accompanying social history, he sometimes overdoes his effects, everything from television to Vegas to Elvis' pelvic thrusts are described as "atomic."But given the dramatic portraits he provides along the way, that's hardly a deal-breaker.
NEWS
November 2, 2007
`The Biz' -- The Student Arts Collective of Howard Community College is presenting its first musical theater revue, The Biz, at 8 p.m. today and tomorrow at the college's Smith Theatre, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. The production, which focuses on dreaming about and breaking into show business, features numbers from Broadway musicals. Tickets are $15; $12 for senior citizens; $10 for students. 410-772-4587. To reserve tickets: 410-772-4900, or www.howardcc.edu/visitors/studentarts.
NEWS
March 1, 2009
To: Gov. Bobby Jindal Fm: Hank McDazzle, McDazzle Image Consulting Re: Fame and fortune Don't let the bastards get you down, Bobby. I know what you're thinking. Your earnest, awkward, platitude-filled and, well, slightly comical performance after President Barack Obama's address to Congress last week has just Katrina'd your career. Listen, nothing could be further from the truth. You're way more handsome than 30 Rock's Kenneth the Page, and how many governors make the kind of splash on YouTube and the late-night network shows like you did?
NEWS
November 2, 2007
`The Biz' -- The Student Arts Collective of Howard Community College is presenting its first musical theater revue, The Biz, at 8 p.m. today and tomorrow at the college's Smith Theatre, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. The production, which focuses on dreaming about and breaking into show business, features numbers from Broadway musicals. Tickets are $15; $12 for senior citizens; $10 for students. 410-772-4587. To reserve tickets: 410-772-4900, or www.howardcc.edu/visitors/studentarts.
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