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NEWS
January 21, 2011
There might be as many beliefs about the proper way to shovel snow as there are snowflakes. The main camps seem to be the pushers, the lifters and the wheelers. On a snowy weekend like this one, you can spot them by the tools that they carry. The pushers employ shovels with long handles and curved, "C" shaped blades. They stand up as they work, placing their shovels on the pavement and propelling themselves and the curling snowpack toward the street. Pushers do their best work in light snowfalls, ones that measure 3 inches or less.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
It's possible that Matthew Olshan didn't fully become a writer until the day that his future boss ordered him to dig a ditch. On that day in the late 1980s, the boss, a carpenter, eyed the short kid with the soft hands. He saw a young man with no experience in the building trades, a new degree from Harvard University and a bewildering mix of aspirations that combined literature and woodworking. The older man understandably was skeptical. "Show up tomorrow and we'll see how you do," he told Olshan.
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NEWS
November 28, 2012
As a dairy farmer, I am getting the bare minimum - a price set by the federal government - for my milk while continuing to pay top dollar for feed and fuel. I am so tired of reading about farmers polluting the Chesapeake Bay. I don't know a single dairy farmer who can afford to dump chemicals in the bay. Most of the dairy farmers have been forced out of business in Maryland. Why is it OK for these sewage treatment plants to repeatedly dump in the bay and no one says a word? They have mechanical or electrical failures over and over and nothing.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 4, 2014
A Prince George's County woman died after collapsing while shoveling snow Monday, county officials said Tuesday. The woman, in her 60s, was believed to have had a heart attack, said Mark Brady, Prince George's fire and EMS spokesman. Paramedics were called to a home in the Glenn Dale area about 3:30 p.m. Monday and transported the woman to a local hospital, where she was pronounced dead.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2012
He first heard the "wails for help" as he walked out of the police station about 10:30 p.m. Saturday. After jumping in his car, putting down the windows and following the sounds, the detective got closer and heard the sound of "metal hitting an object. " Soon after, Detective Mike Ebaugh of the Prince George's County Police Department allegedly witnessed a man "strike a nearly lifeless man with a shovel to the head," according to police. Ebaugh jumped out of his car, pulled out his handgun and ordered the man to drop the shovel, just as the man was "poised to hit the victim once again," police said.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2010
I n recent weeks, we've had more than enough severe winter storms, as well as quality time with our families. As a result, some of us have developed the quirky behaviors of the long-snowbound. Let us examine the warning signs of this irrational state, a result of the progressive whiting-out of reality. The first things to go are your housecleaning and child-rearing standards. The disarray outdoors is mirrored indoors, and you might be prone to inappropriate outbursts. Just the other day, surveying our dreary kitchen landscape of damp snow pants strewn over chairs and slushy boots drying on muddy towels, I shouted: "Why can't you people just stay inside and spend more time surfing the Internet and texting your friends?"
NEWS
October 2, 1996
A man armed with a shovel robbed a Linthicum man and a Baltimore man Monday of their jackets and jewelry at the Linthicum light rail station, county police said.Santo Spencer, 18, of the first block of Hampton Road in Linthicum and Thomas Crowder, 18, of the first block of S. East Ave. in Baltimore, told police they were waiting for a call at a pay phone on Nursery Road when a man riding a bicycle approached them and asked for a cigarette. When they said they didn't have one, the man left, but returned about 10 minutes later on foot with a long-handled shovel and threatened them,police said.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 9, 1999
IN A PERFECT world, I would have been the one in bed under the covers, and my teen-age sons would have been the ones out in the snow, clearing the walks and brushing off the cars.In the real world, it was the other way around. Yesterday morning as I was removing the sheets of snow from the walks and the cars, I heard a voice calling out to me from an upstairs bedroom window.It came from my 13-year-old son. For a moment I thought the kid might be asking to help with the snow-removal effort.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | June 25, 2008
If I were running the presidential campaign of either Barack Obama or John McCain, my first decree would be this: no more photo ops at disaster sites. Such photo ops always make you look dumb, I'd tell my guy. So they're out. We're not doing them anymore. This is an issue right now because neither candidate came off looking too good when they toured the flooded Midwest the other day. Obama was in Quincy, Ill., where the nearby Mississippi River was expected to reach a near-record 32 feet today.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | March 29, 1997
THIS IS the digging season. The breeze is blowing, the sun is shining, and like a big dog, you feel you just gotta get outside and disturb the soil.You pull your shovel out of winter storage and start to do some spade work when a little voice -- the Jiminy Cricket of shovel maintenance -- tells you, "you really should sharpen this thing."Everyone who enjoys getting down and dirty in the garden knows this voice. It is the voice reminding us we can't merely frolic in the mud, that we have tool maintenance respons- ibilities.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
A Glenn Dale woman died of an apparent heart attack after shoveling snow on Monday afternoon, according to Prince George's County Fire and EMS Department officials. Department spokesman Mark Brady said the woman, who was in her 60s, went into cardiac arrest after shoveling snow. She was transported to a local hospital and pronounced dead, Brady said. The exact cause of death will be determined by a chief medical examiner, Brady said. No other local jurisdictions have reported snow-related deaths from Monday's storm.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Custodians at the Church of the Redeemer have struggled this winter to keep its sidewalks clear of snow, but the one flush against North Charles Street in Homeland - buried by nearly every plow that passes - proved too much. The city issued the church a citation for failing to clear the walk. "One of our custodians has been here 30 years, and he doesn't ever recall having that happen before," said Ellen Chatard, program director at the church. It has been a snowy winter with 26.5 inches through Tuesday - nearly 10 inches more than average - and another 1 to 3 inches forecast for Wednesday morning.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
I'm sorry to hear that letter writer David Kulick thinks saving your parking space on the street after a heavy snowfall is a sign of incivility and a lack of commitment to the community ( "The chair in the parking space: A symbol of incivility," Feb. 19). I live on a small, two-way street which isn't wide enough for two cars to pass each other. The alleys to the next street are also connected, and when it snows more than 6 inches you can't get to your garage unless they are cleared.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
If letter writer David Kulick truly wishes to defend the social contract ( "The chair in the parking space: A symbol of incivility," Feb. 20), then my retort is thus: The chair in the road is just a social contract. I plowed, therefore, you do not park. To both foster some mutual humanity in this instance and to not simply allow people to go around freeloading off the hard work of others, let's modify the contract. If you have plowed a space, here or elsewhere, you may park in a plowed spot.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
The biggest snowfall in four years blanketed the Baltimore area Thursday with up to a foot and a half of snow, giving many schoolchildren two more days off and stranding residents and travelers. As the region dug out, two men died after shoveling. In Howard County, two men suffered suspected heart attacks as they shoveled, prompting local officials to urge residents to take it easy clearing snow made heavy by periods of rain. Many flights were canceled and many roads were impassable for part of the day. At least five people in Anne Arundel County were taken to hospitals, including two to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, after traffic accidents.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
Any significant Baltimore winter storm is likely to spark a spirited debate over whether your efforts to dig out your car entitles you to the spot while the snow remains. And as residents brought out their lawn chairs to preserve their handiwork this week, the acrimony flared up again. It doesn't matter if you spend hours shoveling or minutes; there's no legal right to the resulting space on a public street. But there are laws, and then there are social mores. Is it rude to try to save a spot, or ruder to steal one?
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | February 28, 2001
WHEN THE snow falls, the sidewalks have to be shoveled and the shovelers have to be rewarded for their labors with chocolate. That, in my mind, is the code of the snowy sidewalk. So as the flakes fell last week, I started searching for recipes that would inspire the shovel-carrying masses to action. The particular mass I had in mind was the 175 pounds of bulk known as our teen-age son. Like many parents, I have had some success over the years goading my kids to remove snow from sidewalks.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 30, 1992
It's all in the way you look at a surplus of elephant dung.While the state recently cited the city for dumping the Baltimore Zoo's animal manure near the Jones Falls, some gardeners might be happy for the opportunity to visit the Cold Spring Lane pile and haul away that mammalian treasure.I've seen the stuff perform miracles when applied to rose and other flower beds.One spring afternoon 35 years ago, police cars suddenly appeared along 29th Street. People rushed from their Charles Village rowhouses to see what the commotion was all about.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 13, 2014
Heavy wet snow, like the kind that is on the ground now in the Baltimore region , can be a major threat to a person's heart, according to local and national health officials. The American Heart Association says most people will not have any ill effects from exertion, but shoveling and even just walking can increase risk in others. To make the situation safer, the association reminds people they should take frequent breaks, don't eat a heavy meal before or soon after shoveling and use a small shover so the loads are lighter.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
Most weekday mornings, late spring through late summer, Terry Weller and George Foster climb into a bright yellow truck and fire up lasers, high-definition cameras and a bank of digital recorders before hitting the road. Weller and Foster are two of the state's pothole detectives. Their laboratory on wheels is a $1.3 million truthmobile from which asphalt cannot hide its faults. Cracks, bumps and ruts lose their anonymity to ARAN - the Automatic Road Analyzer - a tool that finds trouble before it finds motorists' front tires and suspensions.
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