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By Lou Cedrone | October 7, 1991
''Shout'' is one of those movies that prompts all the obvious comments, one of which is: This movie is nothing to shout about.In truth, every now and then the film makes you cringe. It's that silly.Heather Graham and James Walters play the younger leads in the film. He is an orphan confined to a school for boys, and she is the daughter of the director of the school which is located somewhere in Texas.The time is the early '50s, and it has to be that way. This kind of plot would never play well against a contemporary background.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Police are investigating an alleged "bias incident" in Baltimore County on Thursday afternoon in which a driver allegedly shot a BB or airsoft gun in the direction of three pedestrians as he yelled "Jews, Jews, Jews" at them. The three males told police they were in the 6800 block of Old Pimlico Road about 5:30 p.m., near the intersection with Green Summit Road when the driver approached them, rolled down his window, held a weapon outside and yelled the taunt, police said. He then fired the weapon, which "appeared to be some type of BB or air gun," in their direction, police said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Orlando Sentinel | October 4, 1991
If "Dead Poets Society" had taken place at a Texas home for orphaned boys instead of at a Vermont prep school, it would have been a little like "Shout."Set in the 1950s (as the much-preferable "Dead Poets Society" was), this unfortunate motion picture tells the story of a young teacher who awakens the spirit of the boys in his charge. But instead of poetry, he uses music -- specifically, rock and roll.As the movie opens, Jack Cabe (John Travolta) is just arriving at the Benedict Home for Boys, where his assignment is to lead the band.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre's "Shout! The Mod Musical" is a star-studded show that rates a hearty shout of approval. After success with the 1950s-style jukebox musical "The Marvelous Wonderettes" in 2011 and the nostalgic song-and-dance musical "Swing" in 2013, Annapolis' "theater under the stars" has established a winning formula that relies on a strong ensemble to deliver chart-topping favorites from the past. First produced in 2006, "Shout!" was created by Phillip George and David Lowenstein.  Set in London in the 1960s, the show features about two dozen songs that were hits for female singers, including Petula Clark's "Downtown," Dusty Springfield's "Son of a Preacher Man," Nancy Sinatra's "These Boots are Made for Walkin'" and other hits.
NEWS
By Michael James | December 25, 1991
Three young men shouting "We are the KKK!" terrorized an Hispanic woman working as a custodian in a Columbia interfaith center Monday night, shoved her against a wall and smashed window of her car, Howard County police said yesterday.The assault began shortly before 9:45 p.m. as Nurys Gonzalez, 44, walked out of a restroom in the Wilde Lake Interfaith Center, where she has worked three years. Police said she was confronted by three men whose hooded sweat shirts covered their faces.One of the men pushed Ms. Gonzalez into a wall and shouted, "We are the KKK!
BUSINESS
By Steve Snow and Steve Snow,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 24, 1993
When you are online, using an electronic bulletin board with your computer, you don't have to worry about your breath.Your clothes don't have to match and your fingernails can be dirty.But you still need to observe online etiquette. Consider this a lesson in "netiquette" basics.One of the first lessons is that YOU DON'T HAVE TO SHOUT.That's what all-capital letters seems like online: shouting.SO DON'T DO IT. Please. Makes the reader's ears hurt.Another thing: asterisks flanking a word or a phrase.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1999
At first, you hear the shrill blast of a coach's whistle.Then a gruff voice says: "All right. Today I'm going to demonstrate the proper way to execute the sacrifice."Sounds like baseball talk, right? Not exactly.The gruff voice goes on to say: "Say you do something to disgrace your family name. It happens, no biggie. All you have to do is sacrifice yourself to get your family's honor back. Take a sword."That's where the sound effects of a sword being pulled out of a sheath come in. "Hold it out in front of you, pointy side in. And plunge it in your gut."
NEWS
March 31, 1995
Somewhere the sun is shining,Somewhere the people shout.But there is no joy in Bawlmer,Opening Day is still in doubt.-- Anonymous@
NEWS
January 4, 1993
JOSHUA M. WILLET, 13, son of Nora and Jim Willet of Tyrone Road in Westminster.School: Eighth-grader at Friendship Valley Elementary School.Honored for: Adjusting to being a new student by getting involved in activities, such as chorus, band, Future Homemakers of America and SHOUT (Students Helping Others Understand Themselves), and assuming leadership positions. Joshua transferred to Northwest last year after attending a Catholic school.Goals: To be a veterinarian.Comments: "The change was kind of difficult, but the first day, I made a bunch of friends.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 1997
TOO SMART TO start," was chanted for two minutes by students at North Carroll Middle School in an unusual anti-smoking outdoor assembly last week. It was organized by the student group SHOUT (Students Helping Others Understanding Themselves).For more than a month, Matthew Perry, 11, secretary of the group, contacted newspapers and other news media and was liaison between the SHOUT group and teachers."We thought of this idea last year," said Matthew, a second-year member of the club, "as an addition to the smoke-out campaign for kids.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
It was with a mixture of disappointment and dismay that I read your editorial on the estate tax ( "The $431 million payoff," March 21). It seems The Sun promotes those in the greedy state of Maryland who continue to look for ways to tax us to death, or in this case, benefit from our death. Raising the exemption for the estate tax to $5 million - or tying it to the federal level, which is just over $5 million and pegged to inflation - is not the horrendous injustice that this article proclaims.
EXPLORE
By Benn Ray, benn@atomicbooks.com | September 26, 2013
This year's Hampdenfest, held on Saturday September 14, caught a break and had uncharacteristically gorgeous weather. A record number of people turned out to eat food, drink the Brewer's Art/Union Craft Brewing collaboration beer Hampden Rye, watch local bands like Celebration and Roomrunner play, witness the Hampden Idol competition, take in the toilet races, and more. Local karaoke legend Bobby Ray won the 2013 Hampden Idol karaoke contest, bringing the crowd to its feet not only with his classic crooning style, but his rollicking harmonica accompaniment.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
Last week I received an endorsement from Barrie England, who writes the excellent British language blog Caxton , and who described You Don't Say as offering "well-informed comment about language in the popular press. " He quoted at some length from the post "The Law of Conservation of Peevery. " I was particularly interested in the first post of a series in which Mr. England writes about "the negative canon," the set of crotchets favored by people who "complain about current developments in the language, oblivious to the fact that such developments are sometimes far from new, and that English contains features that have come about through the type of changes in the past that they condemn in the present.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Former Baltimorean Katherine Bouton abruptly lost the hearing in her left ear at age 30. One minute she could hear, and the next, she could not. Over the decades, her impairment worsened. By the time she was 60, she was functionally deaf. But her reluctance to disclose her ailment only increased. And who can blame her? She worked in a highly competitive environment, as a senior editor at The New York Times. In retrospect, Bouton says, remaining silent was a mistake; her hearing impairment contributed to her abrupt departure after 22 years at the newspaper.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV | September 28, 2012
One person who was noticeably missing from the Emmys red carpet was Baltimore-native Stacy Keibler. Sure, she didn't have a link to this year's awards, but she's been a designer's dream -- being named to the New York Post's Best Dressed list for New York Fashion Week with the likes of Anna Wintour, Tyra Banks and Paris Hilton. Keibler was busy tweeting shout-outs to the Ravens as they squeaked out a last-second win versus the New England Patriots. Keibler tweeted numerous messages about the game, including this one about Torrey Smith: "So proud of you @TorreySmithWR.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
Baltimore's famous streaker Mark Harvey received a surprise shout-out from Ellen DeGeneres on Tuesday when she shared the Severn resident's antics with her audience. This isn't the first time DeGeneres has mentioned Harvey on her show. In April, after he streaked at Camden Yards on the Orioles' Opening Day, DeGeneres sent him a cape and underwear. "I thought that was the last I'd ever hear of him," DeGeneres told her audience. Then she showed a clip of Harvey running on the field at the Ravens game Sunday night donning the ensemble.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | December 1, 1991
In case you've been in a deep coma or serving on the Noriega jury, let me inform you that there will be a very big football game this weekend in Tallahassee between our University of Miami Fighting Storm Systems and the Florida State University Native American Tribespersons. The winning team will be ranked No. 1 in college football, as well as two games ahead of the Dolphins in the AFC East Division.We Miami fans are fired up about this game, because as a community we have a fierce lifelong loyalty to the Storm Systems, win or lose, as long as they're ranked in the top five.
NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 1998
LAST FRIDAY was a perfect day to be a kindergarten pupil at Winfield Elementary School. Instead of the usual "sit still and be quiet," the children heard magical words like: "Stand up and start hopping. Keep on hopping. Hop! Hop!"And hop they did.The 105 children hopped in circles. They hopped on one foot and two feet. Some hopped so fast and furiously that they exploded in fits of laughter.All this jumping wasn't part of a physical fitness class or an exercise in dexterity. The children were hopping to raise money for leukemia research.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
Michael Phelps has his weight in gold medals and bragging rights to the title "Most Decorated Olympian of All Time. " And now he's been immortalized in a Kanye West song. West gives Phelps a shout-out on the song "The One," which is off his new collaborative album "Cruel Summer. " The song features 2 Chainz, Big Sean and Marsha Ambrosius. Though the rap is mainly a paean to Kanye (the apparent "One" in question), and features a few too many four-letter words for a family newspaper, the part with Phelps is cleaner than clean.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
It was after the Cincinnati game, after Baltimore's Ravens clinched AFC North title, after those mind-blowing runs by Ray Rice, that the three buddies, who'd just about yelled themselves hoarse, went upstairs to hear some music. That's when the purple lightning bolt struck, just as Kenny Silkworth was showing off one of his instrumental tracks, a piece that sounded inspiring to him — motivating, almost, like a battle hymn. Robert "McFreshington" Norton, who raps in town under the name Fresh Competition, heard it and then began to softly chant, "We are, we are, we are the Ravens nation.
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