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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
A man found not breathing Sunday at the intersection of Baltimore and President streets has died, city police said. Officers were called at 5:45 p.m. to the area of the Shot Tower, where fire department personnel pronounced the man dead. The unidentified man is believed to be 36-years old, police said. Officers found no visible signs of foul play or trauma to the body. An autopsy will be performed to determine the cause of death. jkanderson@baltsun.com twitter.com/janders5
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Two men accused of stabbing a third in an elevator at the Shot Tower metro station this week were arrested Friday after an informant helped police identify them from surveillance images, the Maryland Transit Administration said. The men, both 25, were apprehended with the victim's property in downtown Baltimore about noon, two hours after the informant came forward with information, said Paul Shepard, a MTA spokesman. Police had first released the surveillance images on Thursday.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
Two men accused of stabbing a third in an elevator at the Shot Tower metro station this week were arrested Friday after an informant helped police identify them from surveillance images, the Maryland Transit Administration said. The men, both 25, were apprehended with the victim's property in downtown Baltimore about noon, two hours after the informant came forward with information, said Paul Shepard, a MTA spokesman. Police had first released the surveillance images on Thursday.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
In one of the city's first historic preservation battles, Baltimore residents paid $17,000 in 1924 to save the soaring Phoenix Shot Tower from a wrecking ball and a future as a Union Oil Company gas station. Today, preservationists are again rallying around the Shot Tower. While it is no longer in danger - the city has abandoned a 2012 proposal to consider selling more than a dozen historic properties, including the tower - they say more needs to be done to showcase the attraction and to fully restore what was once the nation's tallest building.
NEWS
By Carol Chesney Meyers | August 24, 1995
IN THE early 1920s, there was a move afoot to raze the Shot Tower. No longer in use at the time, the structure was the only one of its kind still standing anywhere, according to one account from 70 years ago.Baltimore newspapers decided to conduct a Shot Tower poetry contest, in order to generate interest in maintaining the tower as a historic landmark. A great many poets were inspired to use their talents for a worthy cause.There were two 1st prizes, in cash. One of them went to my grandfather, William James Price, for his sonnet, "The Shot Tower Speaks."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | September 17, 1993
About the time the stock market crashed in October 1929, a Baltimore carpenter was salting away some small pieces of city history in a ketchup bottle.Each afternoon after his daily work's quitting time, Emil Urban carried home a bucket of dirt on the streetcar to his Monument Street home a few blocks east of the Johns Hopkins Hospital.The dirt was from the ground floor of Baltimore's 1828 Shot Tower at Fayette and Front streets, just across from today's main city post office. Mixed in with ordinary soil, sand and pigeon-droppings were about five pounds of lead shot used in 19th Century firearms.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1994
The Baltimore City Life Museums, a private, nonprofit group that operates five attractions on the east side of the Inner Harbor, is negotiating with the Schmoke administration to take over operation of the historic Shot Tower by July 1.Built at Fallsway and Fayette Street in 1828 to manufacture musket balls and other kinds of "shot," and now one of the last remaining structures of its kind in the world, the 234-foot-tall Shot Tower has been operated as...
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2002
Charles Carroll of Carrollton might be shocked to see the stout brick mansion on East Lombard Street where he lived and died in the early 1800s. Paint peels from shutters. Leaves, trash and weeds seem to jockey for space under its classical columns. Grime coats the upper windows. Now, new life is being breathed into the empty 194-year-old house that belonged to the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence. The city Board of Estimates agreed yesterday to turn over operation of it and several nearby buildings - including the Shot Tower on East Fayette Street - to a group led by Baltimore County innkeeper Anne Pomykala.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1995
Most people go to a subway station for transportation. But at one of the Metro stations that opened in Baltimore this week, patrons get a history lesson along with the ride.On the mezzanine level of the Shot Tower/Market Place stop, a small but informative exhibit traces the successive layers of construction that have shaped the surrounding area, one of the first sections of Baltimore to see extensive development."Few of us would ever think of a subway train as a time machine," curators note in the introduction to the exhibit, which visitors can see without paying a fare.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1995
Yesterday was the public's first day on the new $353 million extension of the Baltimore Metro from Charles Street to Johns Hopkins Hospital. And the public was pleased.A few people were more than pleased."This is the best thing they ever did," said Patricia Battle, 36, of Upton, in West Baltimore. "I just thank God! This morning it took me only 10 minutes to get to work."Ms. Battle works at Maryland Messenger, a courier company on Albemarle Street near the new Shot Tower/Market Place station.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
A man found not breathing Sunday at the intersection of Baltimore and President streets has died, city police said. Officers were called at 5:45 p.m. to the area of the Shot Tower, where fire department personnel pronounced the man dead. The unidentified man is believed to be 36-years old, police said. Officers found no visible signs of foul play or trauma to the body. An autopsy will be performed to determine the cause of death. jkanderson@baltsun.com twitter.com/janders5
SPORTS
September 19, 2013
It seems that when it comes to the doomed Baltimore Grand Prix, there is really no gray area. Baltimoreans either embraced it or abhorred it. I am in the latter category ( "Grand Prix of Baltimore canceled through 2015, and likely beyond," Sept. 13). But there is hope. I urge Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to not give up the ship in terms of nationally recognized sporting events. I offer these suggestions to the Baltimore Office of Promotion and Tourism and our esteemed mayor: Pasta-eating (gouging)
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
The developer of city-owned land over the Shot Tower Metro station wants to again revise its plans for the parcel, which has sat unused since 2004, the city's development corporation said Wednesday. The Cordish Cos., which gained development rights to 701 E. Baltimore St. in 2005, now wants to build a structure that contains 226 apartments, 15,000 square feet of retail space and 225 parking spots, according to a statement from the Baltimore Development Corp. The revised project is expected to cost about $63 million, according to the BDC statement.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
City Hall is considering selling or leasing 15 historic Baltimore landmarks, including the iconic Shot Tower and stately War Memorial building, which officials believe are underused and could bring the city sorely needed cash. The idea has excited those who say the sites have been neglected and allowed to fall into disrepair. But some preservationists are worried about an uncertain future for buildings they hold dear. "I've never heard about them thinking about anything like this," said Richard S.B. Smith Sr., director of the Friends of Orianda House in Leakin Park, one of the properties to be evaluated.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
Baltimore police said someone crashed a vehicle into the historic Phoenix Shot Tower near Little Italy Sunday afternoon just before 2 p.m. No injuries were reported, and no further information was immediately available. In a separate incident Sunday night, a car flipped over around 9:20 at East Baltimore and President streets, a block south of the Shot Tower. Fire officials say two people were extricated and taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital. No further information was immediately available.
TRAVEL
June 8, 2008
This photo was taken in Paris at the Eiffel Tower last November. It was a cold night, but you hardly think about the weather when confronted with the beauty of this monument, not to mention the city itself. Marco A. Padro Perry Hall The Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number. Submissions cannot be individually acknowledged or returned, and upon submission become the property of The Sun. Write to: Travel Department, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278, or e-mail Travel@baltsun.
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2001
Leaders of a 4-year-old campaign to build a memorial to Baltimore police officers killed in the line of duty have scaled down their plans and hope to turn around a sluggish fund-raising effort that has seen them spend, in some years, far more than they raised. The memorial - to be built next to the Shot Tower - was scheduled to be completed by spring 1999 at a cost originally estimated at $2.2 million and later as high as $3.5 million. But the board of trustees of the Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police Memorial Fund Inc. - composed primarily of widows of slain police officers - has switched architects and is now looking at plans for a memorial that would cost less than $1 million.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2002
One Saturday night in September 1878, the Shot Tower on downtown's east side looked like a 215-foot candle ready to blow. A fire raged inside the brick cylinder where workers for decades had made shot by dropping molten lead. "At that time, the spectacle viewed from any elevated point about the city, or from the harbor or river, was strikingly grand," reported The Sun. "The tower was enveloped in flames, and from the top they shot far up into the air, giving to the distant looker-on the appearance of a great column of fire."
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 20, 2007
From a secluded garden in downtown Baltimore, shaded by four ailanthus trees, there's hardly any sense of the high-rise office buildings several blocks away or the traffic whizzing by on the Jones Falls Expressway. The garden once bordered the estate owned in the early 19th century by Charles Carroll of Carrollton, the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence. Much later, it became part of the Baltimore City Life Museums campus, a public attraction that told the story of Baltimore's history before the museums closed abruptly in 1997.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 9, 2007
It's difficult to predict what in Baltimore will one day be revered as a landmark, but it's not hard to distinguish the ones that have already achieved that status. Take a tour: I was walking down Caroline Street the other morning and reached Fayette. The light glanced off the Shot Tower, which stands like a sentry at the eastern edge of downtown Baltimore. Wilbur H. Hunter, who before his death directed the old Peale Museum, taught me that the roads that lead into Baltimore are like the fingers on your hand.
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