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By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The NCAA rules committee's decision on Thursday not to recommend a shot clock for the 2015 season drew a mixed reaction from a pair of area Division I men's lacrosse coaches. A shot clock had been a heavily debated topic as players, coaches and fans bemoaned the slower pace of play associated with a game that has been called "the fastest sport on two feet. " But the committee, which met Tuesday through Thursday in Indianapolis, instead suggested by next spring the installation of a visible shot clock for the 30-second warning issued when officials rule that an offense is stalling and not making a concerted effort to attack the net. "I'm surprised because I did think there had been enough conversation and a lot of proponents for the shot clock," Johns Hopkins coach Dave Pietramala said.
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By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The NCAA rules committee's decision on Thursday not to recommend a shot clock for the 2015 season drew a mixed reaction from a pair of area Division I men's lacrosse coaches. A shot clock had been a heavily debated topic as players, coaches and fans bemoaned the slower pace of play associated with a game that has been called "the fastest sport on two feet. " But the committee, which met Tuesday through Thursday in Indianapolis, instead suggested by next spring the installation of a visible shot clock for the 30-second warning issued when officials rule that an offense is stalling and not making a concerted effort to attack the net. "I'm surprised because I did think there had been enough conversation and a lot of proponents for the shot clock," Johns Hopkins coach Dave Pietramala said.
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Mike Preston | February 28, 2014
Visible 30 second shot clocks will soon appear on lacrosse fields, but not soon enough for a lot of college coaches. Everyone liked the new rule implemented a year ago that allowed officials to give a stall warning, forcing an offense to either score, shoot and hit a pipe, force a rebound or a goalie save in 30 seconds. By popular demand, it sped up the game. But the one consistent problem that has emerged is that officials aren't consistent in keeping track of the time. Sometimes 30 seconds have become 33 or 34 and with more seconds there are more shots.
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By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
The No. 1 topic in men's college lacrosse this offseason is whether the NCAA will trade its "timer on" rule for a true shot clock. Three men with local ties -- North Carolina coach  Joe Breschi (Loyola High), Delaware coach Bob Shillinglaw (Severna Park) and Mount St. Mary's associate athletic director Mike Hardisky  (Towson State) -- will be part of the nine-member NCAA rules committee that will decide whether to make that change, along with several other possible tweaks.
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The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Almost two years have passed since the NCAA men's lacrosse rules committee announced it would add a 30-second "timer on" countdown to combat stalling and slow play in men's lacrosse. And in the ensuing seasons, it's become clear that the timer is not a magical cure and that further changes need examination. In a column this week for Inside Lacrosse, analyst and Baltimore Sun contributor Quint Kessenich compares the evolution of lacrosse to that of basketball: The shot clock for professional basketball was invented by Syracuse Nationals owner Danny Biasone following the 1954 season in an attempt to speed up the game and prevent teams from stalling.
SPORTS
By Jon Fogg and The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
The No. 1 topic in men's college lacrosse this offseason is whether the NCAA will trade its "timer on" rule for a true shot clock. Three men with local ties -- North Carolina coach  Joe Breschi (Loyola High), Delaware coach Bob Shillinglaw (Severna Park) and Mount St. Mary's associate athletic director Mike Hardisky  (Towson State) -- will be part of the nine-member NCAA rules committee that will decide whether to make that change, along with several other possible tweaks.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | January 27, 1999
First-year Howard boys basketball coach Art St. Martin had his Lions begin Monday's test against league-leading Oakland Mills in an unusual fashion.All five starters stood in a tight, shoulder-to-shoulder circle just past the half-court line and passed the ball from one to another."
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By MILTON KENT | March 12, 2006
COLLEGE PARK-- --It doesn't take long, a few seconds really, a far shorter time than it takes for a team to move the ball upcourt and hoist a shot, to figure out how Earl Hawkins feels about the talk of bringing a shot clock to Maryland public school boys basketball. "I've heard about it and it's the worst thing that could ever happen," Hawkins, the Prince George's County school system's athletic director, said during a break at this weekend's state basketball tournament. Hawkins' opinion is especially significant in Maryland because he is also the chairman of the boys basketball committee for the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association, where such an idea would get its first hearing.
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By MILTON KENT | February 15, 2008
In a little more than two weeks, the state boys basketball tournament will begin with no shortage of intriguing story lines, including whether Randallstown can capture a fourth straight title, who will emerge from the scrum that is the Class 1A North region and whether Howard County can grab a state championship for an unprecedented third consecutive year. Whatever happens between the first-round games on March 1 and the title games in College Park on March 15, there's one thing that certainly won't happen: None of the games will be played with a shot clock.
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By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
After postponing a move to add a 60-second shot clock to its game, the NCAA Men's Lacrosse Committee can expect pressure to eliminate the rule change in the coming months. The nine-person committee, which had voted in July to add a shot clock in the 2001 season, recently elected to delay the change until 2002. The committee decided that visible shot clocks must be present on the sideline, and discovered that not enough schools had available funds to purchase clocks - which cost about $3,000 - for the start of next season.
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The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Almost two years have passed since the NCAA men's lacrosse rules committee announced it would add a 30-second "timer on" countdown to combat stalling and slow play in men's lacrosse. And in the ensuing seasons, it's become clear that the timer is not a magical cure and that further changes need examination. In a column this week for Inside Lacrosse, analyst and Baltimore Sun contributor Quint Kessenich compares the evolution of lacrosse to that of basketball: The shot clock for professional basketball was invented by Syracuse Nationals owner Danny Biasone following the 1954 season in an attempt to speed up the game and prevent teams from stalling.
SPORTS
By Paul Tierney and The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
The game was in the hands of Stephen Peyser. With the Chesapeake Bayhawks on the verge of blowing a five-goal fourth quarter lead during its home opener against the New York Lizards at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, head coach Dave Cottle drew up a play for the former Johns Hopkins midfielder and hoped for the best. He lucked out. With 8:29 remaining in sudden death overtime, Peyser's shot trickled past Lizards goalie Drew Adams and into the goal to give his team a 12-11 victory.
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Mike Preston | February 28, 2014
Visible 30 second shot clocks will soon appear on lacrosse fields, but not soon enough for a lot of college coaches. Everyone liked the new rule implemented a year ago that allowed officials to give a stall warning, forcing an offense to either score, shoot and hit a pipe, force a rebound or a goalie save in 30 seconds. By popular demand, it sped up the game. But the one consistent problem that has emerged is that officials aren't consistent in keeping track of the time. Sometimes 30 seconds have become 33 or 34 and with more seconds there are more shots.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
Maryland's work-in-progress team took the floor Sunday night in a game that felt important because of a big, energized crowd that came not only for the Terps, but to see President Obama and his family seated behind the visitors' bench. If the Terps were going to make errors -- and they made plenty -- it was going to come in front of the world's most famous basketball fan and an announced crowd of 14,776. Maryland did not seem quite ready for the occasion. The Terps played sloppy defense and missed key foul shots in an 90-83 loss to Oregon State that dropped them to 1-2. Everyone else seemed to be looking at the casually-dressed Obama, his wife Michelle and their two children.
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By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Welcome to a second season of Morning Shootaround. We will follow the Terps throughout the 2013-14 season, but this year in this space we will provide a look ahead rather than looking back. We will try to analyze Maryland's strengths and weaknesses, as well as those of its upcoming opponent. We also hope to provide quotes and anecdotes from practices to give some idea of what Mark Turgeon and his team are doing. Here are a few things to look for as the Terps host Abilene Christian on Wednesday night in the home opener at Comcast Center.
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The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Rookie long-stick midfielder Jesse Bernhardt ( Maryland) was chosen as the Warrior Defensive Player of the Week after the Chesapeake Bayhawks' 12-8 win over the Rochester Rattlers on Saturday night, Major League Lacrosse announced Monday. “Jesse Bernhardt continues to improve each week and this was his best game of season in my opinion,” Bayhawks coach Dave Cottle said. “He played great on-ball defense and did a tremendous job of rotating, sliding, and continues to impress me with picking the ball off the ground.
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The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
Rookie long-stick midfielder Jesse Bernhardt ( Maryland) was chosen as the Warrior Defensive Player of the Week after the Chesapeake Bayhawks' 12-8 win over the Rochester Rattlers on Saturday night, Major League Lacrosse announced Monday. “Jesse Bernhardt continues to improve each week and this was his best game of season in my opinion,” Bayhawks coach Dave Cottle said. “He played great on-ball defense and did a tremendous job of rotating, sliding, and continues to impress me with picking the ball off the ground.
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By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2005
Joe Sanford of Southwestern tied the state record for no-hitters in a season when he threw his third on Wednesday - a five-inning gem against Southside in which all 15 outs were recorded by strikeout. Two batters reached on errors. Sanford tied the mark set by Towson's Andre Gardner in 2000. Sanford threw his first no-hitter on April 6 in a 9-3 win over Northwestern. He struck out 17 in seven innings, while the Sabers committed three errors. He pitched his second no-hitter on April 11 against Lewis High, winning, 20-0, in five innings and striking out 12. Daniel denied Mike Daniel, who resigned last week as Towson Catholic boys basketball coach after 20 seasons, said yesterday that he will not be allowed to coach in the United States Basketball Sports Summit in Seattle in June.
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By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
College lacrosse is beginning - albeit slowly - to regain its reputation as the fastest sport on two feet. New rules implemented in the offseason to accelerate the pace of play aren't showing up in the numbers. But anecdotally, what had devolved at times into a slow-plodding, low-scoring slog is turning into a fast-paced, action-packed thriller. "I think they're the best thing to ever happen to the game, to be honest with you," Denver coach Bill Tierney said. "The [NCAA] rules committee took charge of their charge, so to speak, and realized that the game was not getting any better.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
COLLEGE PARK -- With the euphoria of its 51-50 near-the-buzzer win Wednesday over No. 14 North Carolina State fading, the Maryland men's basketball team knows it will have to do more than just the run the plays that second-year coach Mark Turgeon calls Saturday at North Carolina. The suddenly revived Terps , who had lost two straight games before beating the Wolfpack on Alex Len's front rim lay-in with less a second remaining, will likely have to make a much higher percentage of outside shots and finish inside if they want to take down the Tar Heels.
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