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By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1995
At the time of his death, Vince Foster was under investigation for spying for Israel, which paid him millions that he hid in a Swiss bank account. The Oklahoma City bombing couldn't have taken place the way the government said it did, and seismographic charts prove it. Waco was a "Holocaust," but we'll never know the entire story because the government -- see a pattern here? -- bulldozed away the evidence.Welcome to Radio Paranoia, where suspicious minds meet every day to churn current events through various conspiracy theories and arrive at the real truth, the one that the government and mainstream media would hide from you. It is talk radio at its most unfettered, with a sort of outlaw quality befitting its place on the shortwave frequencies of radio, that staticky end of the band you can't pick up on common AM/FM radios.
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NEWS
By Sue du Pont and Sue du Pont,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 28, 2002
IN AN AGE when cell phones and e-mail seem to keep us in constant contact, it is hard to imagine losing the ability to communicate. On Sept. 11, as in other times of emergency, people lost the ability to connect with each other because of power outages and overloaded telephone systems. It is times like these that make the simple technology of the shortwave radio as relevant as ever. That's where the Anne Arundel Radio Club comes in. Members of the Davidsonville-based club run classes to help people become licensed operators.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | January 26, 1991
Even before war began in the Persian Gulf, American troops in Saudi Arabia were hearing the propaganda broadcasts of "Baghdad Betty," a female announcer on Iraqi Radio who warned soldiers their girlfriends back home were dating celebrities such as Tom Selleck, Paul Newman and Bart Simpson."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,COX NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 2001
Last night, I listened to "The Star-Spangled Banner." I heard static crashes in the background, and then the sound of a French announcer speaking words I couldn't translate but that my heart understood. I was listening to a French commercial shortwave station. With a slight twist of the tuning knob, I could hear the news from stations in almost any spot on the globe. The news was all about America's crisis. Because I have a shortwave receiver, I can easily hear - directly from the source, unfiltered by American editors and producers - what the rest of the world is saying.
NEWS
By Forbes Magazine | September 30, 1990
The Christian Science MonitorDaily newspaperCirculation 115,000 (down from 165,000 in 1989 after staff shake-up)Lost $11 million during the church's fiscal year ending in AprilFounded in 1908 by Mary Baker Eddy, the 20-page daily strives to provide in-depth coverage and analysis of national and international news. A weekly edition reaches 21,995 subscribers.World Monitor: The Christian Science Monitor MonthlyMonthly magazine250,000 paid subscribersLost $5.5 million last year, but advertising revenues are risingThe aim of the magazine, launched in 1988, is to report and analyze world affairs.
NEWS
By Sue du Pont and Sue du Pont,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 28, 2002
IN AN AGE when cell phones and e-mail seem to keep us in constant contact, it is hard to imagine losing the ability to communicate. On Sept. 11, as in other times of emergency, people lost the ability to connect with each other because of power outages and overloaded telephone systems. It is times like these that make the simple technology of the shortwave radio as relevant as ever. That's where the Anne Arundel Radio Club comes in. Members of the Davidsonville-based club run classes to help people become licensed operators.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Ann LoLordo Peter H. Frank of The Sun's business staff and Frank P. L. Somerville of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | January 18, 1991
With Iraq's missile attacks on Israeli cities last night, the worst fears Baltimore Jews had harbored these last 5 1/2 months were (( realized."It's sickening, absolutely," said Helaine Abramson of Northwest Baltimore. "It's a most unhappy time for people like me who have lived through other wars and to see this happen on the air. . . . You can see the whole thing."Some, like Baltimore Delegate Samuel I. "Sandy" Rosenberg, admitted to having been lulled by the initial, hopeful reports following the first U.S. air strikes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,COX NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 2001
Last night, I listened to "The Star-Spangled Banner." I heard static crashes in the background, and then the sound of a French announcer speaking words I couldn't translate but that my heart understood. I was listening to a French commercial shortwave station. With a slight twist of the tuning knob, I could hear the news from stations in almost any spot on the globe. The news was all about America's crisis. Because I have a shortwave receiver, I can easily hear - directly from the source, unfiltered by American editors and producers - what the rest of the world is saying.
FEATURES
By Mary Ann Farrell and Mary Ann Farrell,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 1997
In terms of covering disability issues globally, few people know the world better than Jean Parker.Each week, over the Radio for Peace International (RPI) shortwave system, Parker's radio show, "Disability Radio Worldwide," has everything from interviews on the latest topics to what it's like to live with a disability in such war-torn areas as the West Bank and Gaza. Now two years on the air, it's easy to hear the passion she has for her subject.She first became drawn to the Costa Rican-based RPI because of the organization's interest in human rights.
NEWS
By Anne Miller and Anne Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 14, 1999
HELSINKI, Finland -- Latin, that most famous of dead languages, is alive and spoken in Finland, where the national radio company broadcasts a five-minute news summary completely in Latin every Friday afternoon.The show, "Nuntii Latini" ("Latin News"), began in 1989, when Hannu Taanilla, chief cultural redactor of the radio broadcasting company YLE, asked Latin Professor Tuomo Pekkanen and a student if they would do a few Latin spots on a weekly news magazine. Those short segments garnered so much feedback that YLE soon gave Pekkanen and his crew a weekly show.
NEWS
By Anne Miller and Anne Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 14, 1999
HELSINKI, Finland -- Latin, that most famous of dead languages, is alive and spoken in Finland, where the national radio company broadcasts a five-minute news summary completely in Latin every Friday afternoon.The show, "Nuntii Latini" ("Latin News"), began in 1989, when Hannu Taanilla, chief cultural redactor of the radio broadcasting company YLE, asked Latin Professor Tuomo Pekkanen and a student if they would do a few Latin spots on a weekly news magazine. Those short segments garnered so much feedback that YLE soon gave Pekkanen and his crew a weekly show.
FEATURES
By Mary Ann Farrell and Mary Ann Farrell,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 23, 1997
In terms of covering disability issues globally, few people know the world better than Jean Parker.Each week, over the Radio for Peace International (RPI) shortwave system, Parker's radio show, "Disability Radio Worldwide," has everything from interviews on the latest topics to what it's like to live with a disability in such war-torn areas as the West Bank and Gaza. Now two years on the air, it's easy to hear the passion she has for her subject.She first became drawn to the Costa Rican-based RPI because of the organization's interest in human rights.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1995
At the time of his death, Vince Foster was under investigation for spying for Israel, which paid him millions that he hid in a Swiss bank account. The Oklahoma City bombing couldn't have taken place the way the government said it did, and seismographic charts prove it. Waco was a "Holocaust," but we'll never know the entire story because the government -- see a pattern here? -- bulldozed away the evidence.Welcome to Radio Paranoia, where suspicious minds meet every day to churn current events through various conspiracy theories and arrive at the real truth, the one that the government and mainstream media would hide from you. It is talk radio at its most unfettered, with a sort of outlaw quality befitting its place on the shortwave frequencies of radio, that staticky end of the band you can't pick up on common AM/FM radios.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | January 26, 1991
Even before war began in the Persian Gulf, American troops in Saudi Arabia were hearing the propaganda broadcasts of "Baghdad Betty," a female announcer on Iraqi Radio who warned soldiers their girlfriends back home were dating celebrities such as Tom Selleck, Paul Newman and Bart Simpson."
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Ann LoLordo Peter H. Frank of The Sun's business staff and Frank P. L. Somerville of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | January 18, 1991
With Iraq's missile attacks on Israeli cities last night, the worst fears Baltimore Jews had harbored these last 5 1/2 months were (( realized."It's sickening, absolutely," said Helaine Abramson of Northwest Baltimore. "It's a most unhappy time for people like me who have lived through other wars and to see this happen on the air. . . . You can see the whole thing."Some, like Baltimore Delegate Samuel I. "Sandy" Rosenberg, admitted to having been lulled by the initial, hopeful reports following the first U.S. air strikes.
NEWS
By Forbes Magazine | September 30, 1990
The Christian Science MonitorDaily newspaperCirculation 115,000 (down from 165,000 in 1989 after staff shake-up)Lost $11 million during the church's fiscal year ending in AprilFounded in 1908 by Mary Baker Eddy, the 20-page daily strives to provide in-depth coverage and analysis of national and international news. A weekly edition reaches 21,995 subscribers.World Monitor: The Christian Science Monitor MonthlyMonthly magazine250,000 paid subscribersLost $5.5 million last year, but advertising revenues are risingThe aim of the magazine, launched in 1988, is to report and analyze world affairs.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | November 29, 1992
From The Sun Nov. 29-Dec. 5, 1842Nov. 29: The Gas Light Company of Baltimore has declared a half yearly dividend of three percent, payable at the Bank of Baltimore on and after the 1st of next month.Nov. 30: On yesterday morning the ice was sufficiently thick to allow the amusement of skating about the edges of Jones' Falls but not to go ahead a great distance. The boys should be careful: "all that glitters is not gold."From The Sun Nov. 29-Dec. 5, 1892Dec. 2: Towson has a dog-poisoner. Every few months a raid is made upon offensive animals who interrupt slumber.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | June 7, 1991
Tonight's forecast calls for fair skies and continued cool, with a chance of geo-magnetic storms.Government scientists say the eruptions of three huge flares on the surface of the sun since last Saturday have sent blasts of high-energy particles toward Earth.These solar wind "gusts" have caused auroras, or Northern Lights displays as far south as Philadelphia, and threaten to briefly disrupt electrical service, navigation gear and shortwave radio signals.Energy from the most recent flare, on Wednesday night, should reach Earth by tonight, scientists say.So far, little more than auroras have been reported.
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