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By Kate Shatzkin | June 4, 2008
benjaminchristie.com Want to learn how to cook kangaroo meat or make Shortbread Cookies With Wattleseed? This redesigned Web site from an Australian celebrity chef will show you how. And there's information for those in the restaurant business.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | June 4, 2008
benjaminchristie.com Want to learn how to cook kangaroo meat or make Shortbread Cookies With Wattleseed? This redesigned Web site from an Australian celebrity chef will show you how. And there's information for those in the restaurant business.
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NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | February 28, 2007
Karen Kotloff of Baltimore was hoping to find a recipe for a layered shortbread-and-chocolate-bar cookie similar to the ones she had enjoyed at a neighborhood get-together. Lillian Seidman of Pikesville thought she might have just the recipe. What Seidman calls "split levels" are bar cookies with a layer of shortbread followed by a rich, gooey chocolate layer, then topped with another layer of shortbread. These rich, tasty treats are very easy to make and quite pleasing. Split-Level Bars Makes 12 to 16 squares CHOCOLATE FILLING: 8 ounces cream cheese one 5-ounce can evaporated milk 12 ounces semisweet chocolate chips SHORTBREAD BATTER: 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 cup margarine or butter 2 eggs 3 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking powder To prepare filling: Heat cream cheese and evaporated milk in a saucepan over low heat.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | February 28, 2007
Karen Kotloff of Baltimore was hoping to find a recipe for a layered shortbread-and-chocolate-bar cookie similar to the ones she had enjoyed at a neighborhood get-together. Lillian Seidman of Pikesville thought she might have just the recipe. What Seidman calls "split levels" are bar cookies with a layer of shortbread followed by a rich, gooey chocolate layer, then topped with another layer of shortbread. These rich, tasty treats are very easy to make and quite pleasing. Split-Level Bars Makes 12 to 16 squares CHOCOLATE FILLING: 8 ounces cream cheese one 5-ounce can evaporated milk 12 ounces semisweet chocolate chips SHORTBREAD BATTER: 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 cup margarine or butter 2 eggs 3 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking powder To prepare filling: Heat cream cheese and evaporated milk in a saucepan over low heat.
NEWS
By Betty Baboujon and Betty Baboujon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2006
A slow-food friend of mine likes to drive guests crazy trying to guess just what it is - maybe it's a dissolved sliver of Spanish anchovy to deepen that super-meaty sauce or some microscopically minced tarragon to perfume those deviled eggs. But flavor isn't the only way surreptitious little additions can astonish at first bite. Think texture: a crunch bigger than expected, a crispness that lasts, a crumb more delicate than imagined - all with the mere sprinkle of extra-fine flour. Rice flour, potato flour and cornstarch, perhaps most familiar as reliable thickeners for sauces and pie fillings, can transform a batter or dough simply by standing in for some of the regular flour.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 14, 2006
My women's investment club has morphed into a book club. After a decade of poring over stock reports and dutifully keeping abreast of business news, we're calling it quits. Although we made a few blockbuster purchases along the way, when the final tally was in, we barely broke even. If our investing skills were not stellar, our social skills were. The highlight of our meetings was always the time we spent chatting while nibbling on homemade treats. Because most of our group didn't want to give up our convivial get-togethers, we decided to change our focus to books.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 5, 1994
The Girls Scouts have jumped on the health bandwagon with a new cookie -- Cinnamon Oatmeal Raisin Bar. It's not often a new selection surfaces -- maybe every three years -- and this one may be a sleeper."
FEATURES
By Liz McGehee and Liz McGehee,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2001
Gifts from Grandma When I was looking for something meaningful to give co-workers and friends at the holidays, I turned to my grandmothers' kitchens. I made Grandmother Boden's shortbread cookies and gathered recipes from Granny McGehee's extensive collection. And though the two women couldn't have been more different, these projects taught me a lot about what my grandmothers passed on to me in common. Mom says Grandmother Boden disliked cooking. It wasn't that she couldn't or that she didn't cook.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | July 28, 1999
As peaches come into season, thoughts turn to cakes made with the ripe, juicy fruit. Janelee Sunderland of Baltimore wanted an "old-fashioned Baltimore peach cake with a shortcake or hardtack dough like the one a local bakery once sold."Audrey Lasseth of Baltimore came up with a recipe that suits the request.Baltimore Peach CakeServes 4-62 cups flour1/2 teaspoon salt2 teaspoons baking powder3 tablespoons butter1 egg, lightly beaten1 cup milk4 peachessugar, to tasteSift flour, salt and baking powder.
FEATURES
By Michele Nevard and Michele Nevard,LONDON BUREAU OF THE SUN | November 6, 1996
A train journey into the Scottish Highlands brings you into a world of breathtaking scenery, a land of legends and a larder of interesting food.Diet in the remote parts of Scotland is largely determined by availability. Cities like Aberdeen may carry the occasional exotic fruit but the story is different off the beaten track.You can pick abundant wild strawberries in summer and probably follow in the path of Prince Charles strolling out from Balmoral Castle, but generally the menu is determined by ingredients that keep.
NEWS
By Betty Baboujon and Betty Baboujon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2006
A slow-food friend of mine likes to drive guests crazy trying to guess just what it is - maybe it's a dissolved sliver of Spanish anchovy to deepen that super-meaty sauce or some microscopically minced tarragon to perfume those deviled eggs. But flavor isn't the only way surreptitious little additions can astonish at first bite. Think texture: a crunch bigger than expected, a crispness that lasts, a crumb more delicate than imagined - all with the mere sprinkle of extra-fine flour. Rice flour, potato flour and cornstarch, perhaps most familiar as reliable thickeners for sauces and pie fillings, can transform a batter or dough simply by standing in for some of the regular flour.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 14, 2006
My women's investment club has morphed into a book club. After a decade of poring over stock reports and dutifully keeping abreast of business news, we're calling it quits. Although we made a few blockbuster purchases along the way, when the final tally was in, we barely broke even. If our investing skills were not stellar, our social skills were. The highlight of our meetings was always the time we spent chatting while nibbling on homemade treats. Because most of our group didn't want to give up our convivial get-togethers, we decided to change our focus to books.
FEATURES
By Liz McGehee and Liz McGehee,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2001
Gifts from Grandma When I was looking for something meaningful to give co-workers and friends at the holidays, I turned to my grandmothers' kitchens. I made Grandmother Boden's shortbread cookies and gathered recipes from Granny McGehee's extensive collection. And though the two women couldn't have been more different, these projects taught me a lot about what my grandmothers passed on to me in common. Mom says Grandmother Boden disliked cooking. It wasn't that she couldn't or that she didn't cook.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | July 28, 1999
As peaches come into season, thoughts turn to cakes made with the ripe, juicy fruit. Janelee Sunderland of Baltimore wanted an "old-fashioned Baltimore peach cake with a shortcake or hardtack dough like the one a local bakery once sold."Audrey Lasseth of Baltimore came up with a recipe that suits the request.Baltimore Peach CakeServes 4-62 cups flour1/2 teaspoon salt2 teaspoons baking powder3 tablespoons butter1 egg, lightly beaten1 cup milk4 peachessugar, to tasteSift flour, salt and baking powder.
FEATURES
By Michele Nevard and Michele Nevard,LONDON BUREAU OF THE SUN | November 6, 1996
A train journey into the Scottish Highlands brings you into a world of breathtaking scenery, a land of legends and a larder of interesting food.Diet in the remote parts of Scotland is largely determined by availability. Cities like Aberdeen may carry the occasional exotic fruit but the story is different off the beaten track.You can pick abundant wild strawberries in summer and probably follow in the path of Prince Charles strolling out from Balmoral Castle, but generally the menu is determined by ingredients that keep.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 5, 1994
The Girls Scouts have jumped on the health bandwagon with a new cookie -- Cinnamon Oatmeal Raisin Bar. It's not often a new selection surfaces -- maybe every three years -- and this one may be a sleeper."
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | October 5, 1994
Fall's gentle shower of leaves may inspire you to make these rich shortbread cookies. Use leaf-shaped cookie cutters to shape the dough or bake traditional Scottish-style shortbread wedges. The buttery flavor makes this cookie melt in your mouth, so be sure to use the real thing. Start with the plain butter version, then branch out to the ginger or orange-poppy seed variations. Because these cookies are so rich, you'll want to use regular cookie sheets; insulated cookie sheets may cause the butter to leak out during baking.
FEATURES
By LIA GORMSEN | August 5, 2006
What they are -- Shortbread cookies prepared by Graul's Market bakery as part of a summer fund-raiser for the Baltimore Opera Company. What we like about them --These buttery shortbread cookies are in the shape of a horse's head, with a yummy chocolate-dipped mane, and come packaged in a keepsake tin featuring a photograph of the wild horses of Assateague. The whole package, from the cookie baking to the photography on the tin, comes from Maryland-based businesses. All proceeds from the sale will benefit the Baltimore Opera Company.
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