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By Mollyann March and Phillip L. Zweig | February 7, 2014
Maryland has been a pacesetter on some important health care issues like hospital cost control. But on one matter that is seriously impairing patient care - generic drug shortages - Marylanders are facing the same crisis as everyone else. For several years, our hospitals and outpatient surgery centers have been dealing with frequent shortages, and at times complete outages, of mainstay drugs that are often physicians' first choices for high quality care. All Marylanders have a personal stake in ending this public health emergency.
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BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater and Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
After decades of manufacturing decline in Baltimore, city officials say they believe industry is poised to bounce back — and they want to promote a new education track in city schools to train students for the field. The Computer Numerical Control Manufacturing program, being offered this year at Carver Vocational-Technical High School, will train high school students for hard-to-fill skilled machinist jobs. Despite years of job losses, more than 12,000 people worked at more than 440 manufacturing companies last year in Baltimore.
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NEWS
February 12, 2014
Health care group purchasing organizations (GPOs) are taking a variety of innovative steps to mitigate the impact of generic drug shortages. All GPO contracts are voluntary and the product of competitive market negotiations. All hospitals can purchase "off contract" and often do. Contracts can be canceled and pricing regularly adjusted. Manufacturers regularly and quickly adjust pricing of GPO contracts when they experience shocks to production. ( "GPOs fuel drug shortages," Feb. 7)
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
The Maryland health agency responsible for overseeing medical facilities, including the group home where a disabled foster child died this month, is moving to reduce the number of facilities it inspects across the state - even as it acknowledges that thousands of complaints and inspections have not been properly handled. The Office of Health Care Quality says the policy change stems in part from a long-standing, and growing, problem: a shortage of inspectors. The agency proposes to cede some oversight to accrediting organizations while focusing its inspections on facilities with a history of serious problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 18, 2011
There is great fear in the world today about Japanese nuclear reactors exploding in a Chernobyl-level disaster. Citizens in Japan are scrambling to get ahold of potassium iodide, which can protect against radiation poisoning of the thyroid gland.  Here's the rub: Companies that supply potassium iodide are experience a shortage -- a shortage caused by orders from the west coast of the United States. You didn't misread that: The west coast of the United States.  From Business Week : Virginia-based Anbex Inc. s old out of its supply of more than 10,000 14-tablet packages on Saturday , company president Alan Morris .  "Those who don't get it are crying.
NEWS
By Thom Loverro and Thom Loverro,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | November 12, 1991
LONACONING -- Local and state authorities should develop plans to guarantee that the water shortages that struck several Allegany County communities recently do not happen again, Gov. William Donald Schaefer said yesterday.State officials also said they are closely monitoring water shortages in neighboring Garrett County, where wells and springs have been drying up and water supplies dwindling.After hearing that the worst might be over for several communities along the George's Creek -- from south of Frostburg down to Westernport -- Governor Schaefer suggested that local officials "sit down with our people."
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | January 11, 1991
State officials have dusted off emergency plans and are prepared to limit purchases of gasoline, invoke mandatory set-asides of fuel for schools and hospitals, and take other steps in the event war in the Persian Gulf creates oil shortages here."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2002
Vaccine shortages are forcing pediatricians to delay giving shots against diseases from tetanus to whooping cough, raising concerns that the nation could lose ground in the fight against childhood illnesses. The trouble started last summer when doctors had difficulty replenishing supplies of tetanus vaccine. Production problems have since triggered shortages of immunizations against chickenpox, diphtheria, whooping cough, measles, mumps, German measles and pneumococcal disease. For now, pediatricians say the shortages have bedeviled staffers who have had to keep track of patients who did not get shots during scheduled visits, and parents who have had to bring their youngsters back to make up missed shots.
NEWS
By HEARST NEWSPAPERS | April 7, 2001
WASHINGTON - Gasoline prices this summer will be only slightly cheaper than last year's but could increase significantly if there are supply shortages, the U.S. Energy Department said yesterday. Prices are expected to average $1.49 per gallon for regular grade gasoline, only marginally higher than the national average of $1.46 and slightly lower than last summer's record-high average of $1.53, the Energy Information Administration said. The EIA is an independent statistical and analytical agency within the Energy Department.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | October 17, 1991
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Midnight in Belgrade. Instead of sleeping, thousands of motorists are heading for gasoline stations, hopeful that the lines will be shorter at this late hour. Usually they are a mile long instead of three, and the wait is only around two hours.At Belgrade airport, would-be travelers are sent home. Yugoslav Airlines is canceling many flights because of a shortage of jet fuel.Around kitchen tables, there is worried talk of the approach of winter -- and the lack of heating oil.While the leaders of Serbia and Croatia continue to make and break cease-fire agreements, the undeclared war has crept up on Serbs over the past few weeks in the form of vital fuel shortages that are starting to affect everyone's lives.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
Before they get a decision in their immigration cases - before they even have a hearing - the tens of thousands of children entering the country illegally will face an increasingly daunting challenge at the heart of a massive backlog in U.S. immigration court: The young immigrants must first find an attorney. Legal groups and immigration experts say the number of lawyers available to represent undocumented children in Maryland and elsewhere is already woefully inadequate to meet the demand - even though many of the most recent border crossers haven't yet begun to enter the court system.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun and The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
On the night that 10-year-old Damaud Martin died at a troubled group home in Anne Arundel County, there were not enough staffers to handle the care specified for its severely disabled residents, according to the nurse on duty at the time. Mary Zelio, who was watching over Damaud and two other residents, said Friday that each of their care plans called for the home's operator, LifeLine Inc., to provide one-on-one nursing. But she was the only LifeLine nurse on duty in the apartment, one of four the state contractor has used for its group home for disabled foster children.
NEWS
By Douglas A. Beigel | April 22, 2014
A health care crisis is quietly unfolding in our nation's laboratories. This crisis has developed largely off the public's radar screen. If not resolved, it can adversely impact the lives of every American. The crisis in question: alarming shortages within the laboratory workforce. Lab testing has an estimated impact on over 70 percent of medical decisions. That percentage will grow as baby boomers retire and preventive coverage - including screening tests performed by labs - increases as part of federal health care reform.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
BOSTON -- Even though Orioles first baseman Chris Davis has just one home run three weeks into the season, he has still found a way to be productive in the middle of the lineup. After leading the majors with 53 homers last year, Davis knows that teams are attacking him differently. With two walks and a single in his first three plate appearances Monday, he has now reached safely in 17 straight games, tying his career high. Davis hasn't seen very many pitches to hit. He's not seeing many fastballs, and the ones he does see seem to be consistently inside.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Now that the editors of the Associated Press Stylebook  have abandoned the over/more than  distinction beloved of American newspapers (and no one else), there is a very real danger that someone may heed them and abandon the baseless crotchet.   But wait: There's more where that came from. Anyone who finds editing arid and meaningless without the enforcement of arbitrary and meaningless distinctions can discover a rich lode in William Cullen Bryant's Index expurgatorius , the source of the original over/more than shibboleth.  Here are some, taken from the list as reprinted in Theodore Bernstein's Miss Thistlebottom's Hobgoblins . You should feel free to forbid them to any writer or editor under your power, since they have exactly the same authority as the over/more than  distinction.  bogus claimed (for asserted)
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
It's growing increasingly difficult for the poorest families in Baltimore to find affordable rental housing, and some housing advocates worry new housing policies such as privatization could make the problem worse. An analysis by the Urban Institute found a yawning gap between the number of low-income renter households and affordable units available in every jurisdiction in the country. In Baltimore City in 2012, there were 43 affordable units available per 100 extremely low-income households, down from 58 in 2000, according to the study published last week.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1999
Maryland and Carroll County administrators hammered out an agreement Friday that will increase the water supply to South Carroll, the county's most populated area and one troubled by seasonal shortages, with new wells.The state Water Utility and Supply Agreement will allow Carroll to build five wells, a small filtration plant and connecting lines on state-owned land at Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville. The operation will supplement the Freedom District Plant, which can treat as much as 3 million gallons daily from the Liberty Reservoir.
BUSINESS
By Jennifer Dorroh and Jennifer Dorroh,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
Maryland's nursing shortage intensified last year, and shortages of other health care professionals became more severe, according to the results of a survey released yesterday by the Association of Maryland Hospitals and Health Systems. Up to 3,679 health care workers, including as many as 1,680 registered nurses, are needed to fill vacant positions statewide, the survey indicated. The survey "shows a very serious and growing shortage of hospital personnel," said association President Cal Pierson.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
Carrying protest signs in English and Spanish, opponents of the Venezuelan government rallied peacefully Saturday at the World Trade Center in Baltimore in solidarity with demonstrations in the South American country against the administration of President Nicolas Maduro. About 80 people had gathered by early afternoon, standing in a circle in front of the building hoisting the country's yellow, blue and red flag, chanting anti-government slogans and listening to Venezuelan folk songs on a boom box. The demonstration was meant to coincide with others taking place in 70 cities around the world to bring international pressure on Maduro's government, which opponents blame for political repression, rampant crime and shortages of basic goods.
NEWS
February 12, 2014
Health care group purchasing organizations (GPOs) are taking a variety of innovative steps to mitigate the impact of generic drug shortages. All GPO contracts are voluntary and the product of competitive market negotiations. All hospitals can purchase "off contract" and often do. Contracts can be canceled and pricing regularly adjusted. Manufacturers regularly and quickly adjust pricing of GPO contracts when they experience shocks to production. ( "GPOs fuel drug shortages," Feb. 7)
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